Author Topic: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations  (Read 4450 times)

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lovinAZ

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Re: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2007, 01:42:42 AM »
For me, it depends on why I'm cooking.  For example...

I make homemade pasta and sauce, though not often.  When I want to make some and invite people to share it with me, I do not invite my vegan friends (I have a few).  I generally don't invite vegetarian friends, either (there are several of those, as well), because the sauce tastes better (to me) with meat cooked in it (though I don't eat the meat myself once everything is cooked).  I have enough omnivore friends that I can still have a nice dinner party with 6 or 8 people.  I don't want to cut spaghetti for more than that many people anyway!

But if I'm entertaining because I want to get my close friends together, then I'll plan a vegan menu, since, in that circle, I am the only one not vegetarian or vegan (I eat chicken and occasionally pork).


In your case, I'd let them know what you're making and let them decide for themselves.

blarg314

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Re: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2007, 02:36:08 AM »


I like the idea of inviting with the specific purpose mentioned (it's gumbo night!) and letting people decided.


To clarify - this isn't my normal mode of inviting. My normal appropach would be to have people over in the evening and serve a variety of appetizers, partially because doing a full meal is so complicated, or something casual where we boil pasta and dump sauce on it.  If I have a dinner party focussed around a group of people (say my Chinese class), I cook something that everyone can eat.

Occasionally, however, I like to cook a complicated, multi part meal to share - I like to cook and I'm good at it. Doing this for a random assortment of people from  my social people typically involves factoring in the vegetarians, non drinkers, people who dislike spicy food, people who are allergic to nuts and shellfish, lactose intolerant and gluten intolerant people and so on.

I'm also one of the only ones of my group of friends who actually has a kitchen, and my kitchen consists of two burners, a microwave, a toaster oven and a rice cooker, and a fridge shared with six other people, which makes preparing multiple dishes or co-hosting awkward - preparing one meal takes some planning and modification of the usual cooking techniques.  Most people have a hot plate and a kettle, and that's it.

I think my fundamental issue is always having to cook to the lowest common denominator. I don't like inviting someone knowing that they can't eat what I'm preparing, but in order to produce something that everyone can eat, I either have to cook from a fairly limited selection of dishes, or cook multiple meals. And there are some dishes which are really not meant to be cooked for one person.



blarg314

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Re: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2007, 02:40:48 AM »


I also like the analogy comparing this sort of evening to a movie night or a game night or some other themed event - I wouldn't invite someone who hated gambling to a poker night, and I wouldn't invite someone who hated Monty Python to a night watching British comedy DVDs, or someone who publicly proclaimed their dislike of sports to a Superbowl party.  Nor would I expect to change the nature of the event  to suit everyone who might be invited - "I'm having a poker party, want to come?  Sure, but only if you change it to a Monopoly game, because I hate poker"

Basically food as a reason for an event, rather than an event as a reason for food.

 

MadMadge43

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Re: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2007, 03:25:41 AM »
I think you are perfectly justified in letting guests know before hand what you are serving and letting them decide.

In our group of friends there is one vegetarian (BF's best friend's girlfriend). One night I had to get rid of a homemade lasangna in the fridge and invited the guys over. I didn't invite best friend and his girlfriend because it was a pepperoni lasangna and I really didn't feel like accommodating her. (It really was just kick back, right after the holidays and all I had to do was throw it in the oven, any more work than that would have thrown me over the edge).

Well, turns out, she just loves a party and told me to never again not invite them because of her dietary restriction. She will bring her own food and be happy as a clam, she just hates to miss out on get togethers.

Totally my bad. So Sunday I'm making Sunday dinner with a big  roast Pork Shoulder and she's coming and going to bring a veggie burger to grill up and eating the rest of the sides.

If the occassion is about the meal, "Hey everyone we're having a clam bake" etc. then those with dietary restrictions should byob or eat sides.

But if you're inviting them to dinner to host them, than the menu should be arranged accordingly.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2007, 03:33:21 AM by MadMadge43 »

Ferrets

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Re: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2007, 04:55:47 AM »
- Invite the spice hating vegetarian and let them eat rice

- Invite the spice hating vegetarian and let them know that they'll have to bring their own food

Frankly, I think either of those would be fine, especially as you said your meals were casual affairs.


Actually, I think the first of these is rather awful. I see nothing wrong at all with not inviting vegetarians to all-meat dinner, but it's not nice to invite someone to something and then not have anything for them to eat.

If they are people you know well, and the event is very casual, I wouldn't have a problem with asking them to bring a vegetarian dish to share.

I see your point, but actually for the first, I was thinking more along the lines of inviting them and warning them that the only bland veggie-friendly food was rice, then saying they could bring their own or eat only the rice. (I was probably influenced by the fact that I would be quite happy to hoover up just a big plate of rice -for example, as I don't particularly like Chinese food, it's a course of action I fall back on when a group goes to a Chinese restaurant).

I should have been clearer! Sorry for any confusion.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2007, 04:58:12 AM by WolfieSara »

Lady Vavasour

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Re: Spinoff of Dietary Accomodations
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2007, 07:14:25 PM »
[

I see your point, but actually for the first, I was thinking more along the lines of inviting them and warning them that the only bland veggie-friendly food was rice, then saying they could bring their own or eat only the rice. (I was probably influenced by the fact that I would be quite happy to hoover up just a big plate of rice -for example, as I don't particularly like Chinese food, it's a course of action I fall back on when a group goes to a Chinese restaurant).

I should have been clearer! Sorry for any confusion.

OK! :)