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  • August 26, 2016, 12:14:51 AM

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Author Topic: Your constant singing/loud sighing/meowing is driving me and everyone else mad  (Read 2477 times)

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LEMon

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UPDATE:

So it seems Bob is perfectly capable of spending an entire day working in almost silence. It seems like either that coworker having a grumpy outburst at him yesterday made an impact, or else someone took him aside and had a few words with him. Or maybe he's just sulking. I've had barely a warble, hum or mumble out of him all day. It's been bliss.

Either way, I now know he's capable of working in silence. I'll just have to be more firm about stopping it once it starts up again.
Quick, thank him for how today has been.

greencat

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  • Trap...Neuter...What was that third thing again?
Any time he does start up again, send both Bob and Bob's Boss an email.  Start putting your complaints in writing.  "Bob, we've spoken before about how distracting it is when you -meow at your desk/talk like a cartoon character/heave dramatic sighs all day-.  Please stop."

TabathasGran

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Any time he does start up again, send both Bob and Bob's Boss an email.  Start putting your complaints in writing.  "Bob, we've spoken before about how distracting it is when you -meow at your desk/talk like a cartoon character/heave dramatic sighs all day-.  Please stop."

As a manager I would want to kick my staff in the shin* if they did this. That goes double for keeping a chart. That would tick me off more than the noisemaker.

Just tell him to knock it off and then tell your own manager about it if that doesn't work and it's truly a problem.

*not a good management technique.


greencat

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Any time he does start up again, send both Bob and Bob's Boss an email.  Start putting your complaints in writing.  "Bob, we've spoken before about how distracting it is when you -meow at your desk/talk like a cartoon character/heave dramatic sighs all day-.  Please stop."

As a manager I would want to kick my staff in the shin* if they did this. That goes double for keeping a chart. That would tick me off more than the noisemaker.

Just tell him to knock it off and then tell your own manager about it if that doesn't work and it's truly a problem.

*not a good management technique.

The OP has already taken those steps, and now needs to document document document the disruptions Bob is making to her work environment.

You may be annoyed by it, but your job as a manager is to handle issues like this.

Twik

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Any time he does start up again, send both Bob and Bob's Boss an email.  Start putting your complaints in writing.  "Bob, we've spoken before about how distracting it is when you -meow at your desk/talk like a cartoon character/heave dramatic sighs all day-.  Please stop."

As a manager I would want to kick my staff in the shin* if they did this. That goes double for keeping a chart. That would tick me off more than the noisemaker.

Just tell him to knock it off and then tell your own manager about it if that doesn't work and it's truly a problem.

*not a good management technique.

No, kicking shins is not a good management technique. Particularly when you are the manager of a trouble-making employee, and the other employee has done everything that you've indicated to no avail. At some point, you are required to actually manage. Getting mad that other people ask you to do your job is not good management technique either.
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artk2002

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Any time he does start up again, send both Bob and Bob's Boss an email.  Start putting your complaints in writing.  "Bob, we've spoken before about how distracting it is when you -meow at your desk/talk like a cartoon character/heave dramatic sighs all day-.  Please stop."

As a manager I would want to kick my staff in the shin* if they did this. That goes double for keeping a chart. That would tick me off more than the noisemaker.

Just tell him to knock it off and then tell your own manager about it if that doesn't work and it's truly a problem.

*not a good management technique.

The OP has already taken those steps, and now needs to document document document the disruptions Bob is making to her work environment.

You may be annoyed by it, but your job as a manager is to handle issues like this.

As far as I can tell, OP has talked to Bob's manager, not her own. That should have been the first step after talking directly to Bob yet.
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nyarlathotep

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UPDATE:

So it seems Bob is perfectly capable of spending an entire day working in almost silence. It seems like either that coworker having a grumpy outburst at him yesterday made an impact, or else someone took him aside and had a few words with him. Or maybe he's just sulking. I've had barely a warble, hum or mumble out of him all day. It's been bliss.

Either way, I now know he's capable of working in silence. I'll just have to be more firm about stopping it once it starts up again.

Quick, thank him for how today has been.

This! Positive reinforcement is your ally here.