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  • August 20, 2017, 08:13:10 PM

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Author Topic: Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)  (Read 1381349 times)

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gingerzing

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  • Posts: 1270
My "favorite" are the requests I get for materials.  Usually from our website's contact us page and frequently are just these two lines.  (If I am lucky I get the second line.)
"I would like a poster of a chart and some handout brochures.  Thank you"

Problem?  My email is not set up to send physical materials through the internet.  And while the disk drive is not a cup holder, nor does it transfer posters from my office to the person requesting the material.
 Now if I can get an actual physical mailing address....

Added points if the person requesting the materials has written a long drawn out reason why they need materials and still forgets to give me mailing address. 

Additional points if what they requested has been out of print for more than 15 years.  And refuses to understand why I can't just send them that one brochure just this one time.  (In some cases we don't even have a copy in our archive. Let alone an extra to send to them.)

ladyknight1

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  • Posts: 11611
  • Not all those who wander are lost
He had responded. Or rather, his email provider had responded, with a form letter explaining that the gentleman I had dared to email was not willing to accept emails from just anyone. No, he had standards, and if I wanted him to respond I had to hie myself to the provided link with hat in hand and give a darned good reason why the gentleman should condescend to grace me with a reply. I'm willing to concede the remote possibility that the actual email contained slightly less scorn, but you get the gist.

People sign up with these email providers because they provide a way to weed out most of the spam that comes in.   No offense, but it has nothing to do with you, his friends and family members have to do the same thing.  I have several friends and family members who have a 3rd party spam filter that requires you to fill out a short form to verify that you are an actual person they know.  I don't take it personally and It only takes a few seconds to complete.

It took more than a few seconds this time, due to some problems with the site. But I do understand your point. The thing is, though, if you're deliberately emailing someone and asking for a response, I think it's on you to proactively add that email address to your approved list. As I said, if this had been a personal communication I would've just ignored it and not bothered to do what was necessary to get my reply through. Since it was work, I jumped through the hoops. But I still think it's ridiculous, and I'd like to see whatever evidence exists that this significantly cuts down on spam.

I refuse to complete the questionnaire to get on the approved list with the one email provider I know of that does that. Worse, I have students complete our online interest cards to receive emails of interest to them, who use that particular provider. I know they will not actually receive the emails, but I can't change anything!
“All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

PastryGoddess

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  • Posts: 6252
He had responded. Or rather, his email provider had responded, with a form letter explaining that the gentleman I had dared to email was not willing to accept emails from just anyone. No, he had standards, and if I wanted him to respond I had to hie myself to the provided link with hat in hand and give a darned good reason why the gentleman should condescend to grace me with a reply. I'm willing to concede the remote possibility that the actual email contained slightly less scorn, but you get the gist.

People sign up with these email providers because they provide a way to weed out most of the spam that comes in.   No offense, but it has nothing to do with you, his friends and family members have to do the same thing.  I have several friends and family members who have a 3rd party spam filter that requires you to fill out a short form to verify that you are an actual person they know.  I don't take it personally and It only takes a few seconds to complete.

It took more than a few seconds this time, due to some problems with the site. But I do understand your point. The thing is, though, if you're deliberately emailing someone and asking for a response, I think it's on you to proactively add that email address to your approved list. As I said, if this had been a personal communication I would've just ignored it and not bothered to do what was necessary to get my reply through. Since it was work, I jumped through the hoops. But I still think it's ridiculous, and I'd like to see whatever evidence exists that this significantly cuts down on spam.

I refuse to complete the questionnaire to get on the approved list with the one email provider I know of that does that. Worse, I have students complete our online interest cards to receive emails of interest to them, who use that particular provider. I know they will not actually receive the emails, but I can't change anything!

What do you mean? If you completed the short questionnaire, they could receive the emails they are requesting.  You do know that you don't have to actually tell the truth on those things.

In your personal life you absolutely don't have to deal with these types of providers, but this is your job and those students who are interested are helping to pay for the schools expenses..no?  Why would you deliberately do something that deprives potential students of information?

Onyx_TKD

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  • Posts: 1978
He had responded. Or rather, his email provider had responded, with a form letter explaining that the gentleman I had dared to email was not willing to accept emails from just anyone. No, he had standards, and if I wanted him to respond I had to hie myself to the provided link with hat in hand and give a darned good reason why the gentleman should condescend to grace me with a reply. I'm willing to concede the remote possibility that the actual email contained slightly less scorn, but you get the gist.

People sign up with these email providers because they provide a way to weed out most of the spam that comes in.   No offense, but it has nothing to do with you, his friends and family members have to do the same thing.  I have several friends and family members who have a 3rd party spam filter that requires you to fill out a short form to verify that you are an actual person they know.  I don't take it personally and It only takes a few seconds to complete.

It took more than a few seconds this time, due to some problems with the site. But I do understand your point. The thing is, though, if you're deliberately emailing someone and asking for a response, I think it's on you to proactively add that email address to your approved list. As I said, if this had been a personal communication I would've just ignored it and not bothered to do what was necessary to get my reply through. Since it was work, I jumped through the hoops. But I still think it's ridiculous, and I'd like to see whatever evidence exists that this significantly cuts down on spam.

I refuse to complete the questionnaire to get on the approved list with the one email provider I know of that does that. Worse, I have students complete our online interest cards to receive emails of interest to them, who use that particular provider. I know they will not actually receive the emails, but I can't change anything!

What do you mean? If you completed the short questionnaire, they could receive the emails they are requesting.  You do know that you don't have to actually tell the truth on those things.

In your personal life you absolutely don't have to deal with these types of providers, but this is your job and those students who are interested are helping to pay for the schools expenses..no?  Why would you deliberately do something that deprives potential students of information?

When she said they were signing up for "emails of interest to them," I got the impression they were signing up for an automated newsletter or something similar. In that case, the email address probably doesn't accept replies, so there is no way for the form to be filled out.

amylouky

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  • Posts: 1517
He had responded. Or rather, his email provider had responded, with a form letter explaining that the gentleman I had dared to email was not willing to accept emails from just anyone. No, he had standards, and if I wanted him to respond I had to hie myself to the provided link with hat in hand and give a darned good reason why the gentleman should condescend to grace me with a reply. I'm willing to concede the remote possibility that the actual email contained slightly less scorn, but you get the gist.

People sign up with these email providers because they provide a way to weed out most of the spam that comes in.   No offense, but it has nothing to do with you, his friends and family members have to do the same thing.  I have several friends and family members who have a 3rd party spam filter that requires you to fill out a short form to verify that you are an actual person they know.  I don't take it personally and It only takes a few seconds to complete.

It took more than a few seconds this time, due to some problems with the site. But I do understand your point. The thing is, though, if you're deliberately emailing someone and asking for a response, I think it's on you to proactively add that email address to your approved list. As I said, if this had been a personal communication I would've just ignored it and not bothered to do what was necessary to get my reply through. Since it was work, I jumped through the hoops. But I still think it's ridiculous, and I'd like to see whatever evidence exists that this significantly cuts down on spam.

I refuse to complete the questionnaire to get on the approved list with the one email provider I know of that does that. Worse, I have students complete our online interest cards to receive emails of interest to them, who use that particular provider. I know they will not actually receive the emails, but I can't change anything!

What do you mean? If you completed the short questionnaire, they could receive the emails they are requesting.  You do know that you don't have to actually tell the truth on those things.

In your personal life you absolutely don't have to deal with these types of providers, but this is your job and those students who are interested are helping to pay for the schools expenses..no?  Why would you deliberately do something that deprives potential students of information?

I refuse to do these, because I hate those programs, and if people comply with them they'll stay around longer. I do think that the use of those programs is rude, especially when you have requested someone to email you and then make them do the work for your choices.

I support our email billing process at my company. If we get a "click here to verify yourself" response to an ebill, we don't do anything with it. We just wait for the customer to call in and complain that they didn't get their bill, and tell them they need to add us to their list themselves. We don't monitor the email inbox that these go back to, and are not going to take the time to add that as someone's responsibility, when it is the customer's choice to use those programs.

hobish

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  • Posts: 17892
  • Release the gelfling!
My usual (good-natured, I promise!) response to things like that is, "Well, I failed my ESP test!" In other words, I can't read your mind!  ;D

:) I have told people - also good-naturedly, "My crystal ball is perpetually cloudy," and, "I'm sorry, but we're fresh out of pixie dust and the elves just up and quit." Believe it or not i am one of the more pleasant people in my department to deal with.
It's alright, man. I'm only bleeding, man. Stay hungry, stay free, and do the best you can.
~Gaslight Anthem

PastryGoddess

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  • Posts: 6252
He had responded. Or rather, his email provider had responded, with a form letter explaining that the gentleman I had dared to email was not willing to accept emails from just anyone. No, he had standards, and if I wanted him to respond I had to hie myself to the provided link with hat in hand and give a darned good reason why the gentleman should condescend to grace me with a reply. I'm willing to concede the remote possibility that the actual email contained slightly less scorn, but you get the gist.

People sign up with these email providers because they provide a way to weed out most of the spam that comes in.   No offense, but it has nothing to do with you, his friends and family members have to do the same thing.  I have several friends and family members who have a 3rd party spam filter that requires you to fill out a short form to verify that you are an actual person they know.  I don't take it personally and It only takes a few seconds to complete.

It took more than a few seconds this time, due to some problems with the site. But I do understand your point. The thing is, though, if you're deliberately emailing someone and asking for a response, I think it's on you to proactively add that email address to your approved list. As I said, if this had been a personal communication I would've just ignored it and not bothered to do what was necessary to get my reply through. Since it was work, I jumped through the hoops. But I still think it's ridiculous, and I'd like to see whatever evidence exists that this significantly cuts down on spam.

I refuse to complete the questionnaire to get on the approved list with the one email provider I know of that does that. Worse, I have students complete our online interest cards to receive emails of interest to them, who use that particular provider. I know they will not actually receive the emails, but I can't change anything!

What do you mean? If you completed the short questionnaire, they could receive the emails they are requesting.  You do know that you don't have to actually tell the truth on those things.

In your personal life you absolutely don't have to deal with these types of providers, but this is your job and those students who are interested are helping to pay for the schools expenses..no?  Why would you deliberately do something that deprives potential students of information?

I refuse to do these, because I hate those programs, and if people comply with them they'll stay around longer. I do think that the use of those programs is rude, especially when you have requested someone to email you and then make them do the work for your choices.

I support our email billing process at my company. If we get a "click here to verify yourself" response to an ebill, we don't do anything with it. We just wait for the customer to call in and complain that they didn't get their bill, and tell them they need to add us to their list themselves. We don't monitor the email inbox that these go back to, and are not going to take the time to add that as someone's responsibility, when it is the customer's choice to use those programs.


Good point. 

MissRose

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  • Posts: 1614
I just had a customer who wanted his billing details updated on his account.  Unfortunately, he was not able to answer the required security questions.  Also, he was not logged into his account where he has that detail stored as the main person to tell me the answers.  He kept complaining that he could not hear me despite my volume on my headset turned on high, my mic right next to my mouth and speaking a bit louder than normal.  He then went to tell me I had an attitude problem and demanded my supervisor.

I transferred him as requested, the customer still complained about me, the volume and the process.  He was on the phone with the supervisor lead person for 10 minutes or more.

A boss a level above the person who gets the escalated call said he was listening in for a few minutes, and backed up both me and the lead person in our handling of the issue.

Raintree

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  • Posts: 6795
I'll never forget, from my photofinishing days, the impossible cropping requests.

People would see their 4x6 print of a group shot, and want an 8x10. But an 8x10 will cut off the sides of a picture because it's a different aspect ratio to a 4x6. You can decide what you want cut out, but you have to cut out something. Think about it. Double 4 inches, and you get 8 inches. Double 6 inches, and you get 12.  Not 10. Therefore, if you want to see the entire picture you saw in your 4x6, you have to order an 8x12.

So this woman comes in, upset because in her 8x10, the people standing at the sides are cut out. I explained that she'd have to get an 8x12 to get them all in.

"Oh no, it has to fit into my 8x10 frame that I bought for this picture."
"Well then, you can either have the people at the edges cut off, or we can make the whole thing smaller but you'd have black lines above and below the image on the 8x10."
"Oh no, I don't want black lines. I want it to fill the whole frame."
"Well unfortunately you can't do that without losing the people at the edges."
"No, I want all the people included."
"Well I'm afraid you'll have to get an 8x12 and use a different frame."
"But I want to use THIS frame. That was the whole idea."

I can't tell you how many times I had similar conversations. I still am not sure why it was so hard to understand the concept of dimensions and also the idea that if you crop out the top, you also have to crop something off the sides.


MissRose

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Raintree, one of my friends who works in a photolab inside a popular store could tell me a few tales of what customers ask for in terms of photo finishing and product recommendations!

Luci

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  • Posts: 7551
I'll never forget, from my photofinishing days, the impossible cropping requests.

People would see their 4x6 print of a group shot, and want an 8x10. But an 8x10 will cut off the sides of a picture because it's a different aspect ratio to a 4x6. You can decide what you want cut out, but you have to cut out something. Think about it. Double 4 inches, and you get 8 inches. Double 6 inches, and you get 12.  Not 10. Therefore, if you want to see the entire picture you saw in your 4x6, you have to order an 8x12.

So this woman comes in, upset because in her 8x10, the people standing at the sides are cut out. I explained that she'd have to get an 8x12 to get them all in.

"Oh no, it has to fit into my 8x10 frame that I bought for this picture."
"Well then, you can either have the people at the edges cut off, or we can make the whole thing smaller but you'd have black lines above and below the image on the 8x10."
"Oh no, I don't want black lines. I want it to fill the whole frame."
"Well unfortunately you can't do that without losing the people at the edges."
"No, I want all the people included."
"Well I'm afraid you'll have to get an 8x12 and use a different frame."
"But I want to use THIS frame. That was the whole idea."

I can't tell you how many times I had similar conversations. I still am not sure why it was so hard to understand the concept of dimensions and also the idea that if you crop out the top, you also have to crop something off the sides.

Make a 4 X 5 template and hold it over the 4 X 6 picture and try to explain that the proportions are the same as the 8 X 10 and this is what they'll get. A simple visual sometimes works better than all the words in the world.

(The template looks like a framing mat with the hole in the middle.)

Elfmama

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  • Derailing threads since 2001!
This was for film cameras, right?  Because with a digital photo, you can change the aspect ratio to do that.  Of course, that distorts the picture a bit, so they'd probably scream about that.

Did anyone ever ask you to take away bits of the picture so that they could see something that the bits hid?  I heard a story once about a photo studio that was brought a picture of a cow being milked; cow in the foreground, and the man manually milking her was just visible as a pair of legs behind her.  The customer wanted the cow taken away, so that she would have a picture of the man.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

otterwoman

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  • Posts: 1081
I worked in the photo finishing business for a dozen years. One of the worst customers was a self proclaimed "Professional Photogragher". He came in with a 8x12 photo and wanted a copy for a cliet. I asked him for the negative.

"Oh, I can't find it." Huh? What professional doesn't have his negatives?

Okay, I can copy it, but our photograph copier only makes 8x10 photos. I can send out your 8x12 for a better copy.

"No. I don't want it to leave the store."

Okay, you're going to lose 2 inches of photo. I led him to the machine and tried to set up the copy the best I could. He would see the preview come up on the screen and complain that it was missing the ends. After 8 tries, each time I'm explaining that he WILL lose the ends, I let him set up the photo on his own. When he was ready to print, I AGAIN explained that he would not be getting the entire 8x12 on his 8x10 copy. I also told him NO REFUNDS!

He gave the okay, seemed happy, paid and left.


One week later...he was back. And mad. The copy didn't have all the image and he wanted his money back. I told him no. He yelled. I reminded him of our conversation, that he set up the copy, and okayed it. He called me a liar. I threw him out.

He came back with a Mall Security Officer. The officer asked him to stay outside while the officer talked to me. The officer asked me what was up with "that jerk". I started to tell him, then "that jerk" came in the store. The officer asked him to step back outside. He refused. I finally looked at him and said, "If I give you your money back, you never NEVER come into my store again." He agreed. I gave him back his $10. The officer told him that if jerk ever came into the store again, he would be arrested for trespassing.

But wait...there's more!!

The next day, I got a call from our home office. Jerk had called to complain about me. Not that I had throw him out forever. Not that he was threatened with arrest. Nope, he was complaining because he had entered some (bad) photos in our company's photo contest and he hadn't been called yet to tell him he'd won. Customer service wanted to make sure I had really entered his photos. Yes, I had.


StuffedGrapeLeaves

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  • Posts: 721
Did anyone ever ask you to take away bits of the picture so that they could see something that the bits hid?  I heard a story once about a photo studio that was brought a picture of a cow being milked; cow in the foreground, and the man manually milking her was just visible as a pair of legs behind her.  The customer wanted the cow taken away, so that she would have a picture of the man.

I had a friend who worked in a photo studio, and had a client came in who wanted my friend to add a person to the photo.  My friend thought he meant that he wanted the person Photoshopped into the photo, and told him that he can't do Photoshop at the store, but if the client knew anyone with Photoshop or something similar, he could add the person in and bring in the modified photo to be printed.  No, that was not what the client wanted.  He wanted my friend to add his friend to the photo, but not using a computer.  He said my friend just needed to print the photo again with his friend in it.  Nothing my friend said convinced the client that what he was asking was impossible, and the client left irate and complained to the store manager.  The store manager was shaking with laughter when he told my friend about the complaint. 

LazyDaisy

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I do a lot of Photoshop work and I've had people ask me to remove something from a photo and think that what was behind it will appear -- um no, but I can clone some of the surrounding background into the spot most of the time, depends on the busy-ness of the background and how big the area that needs to be removed. My favorite requests are for using a horizontal photo on a magazine cover. Forget about cropping an inch on each side, half the photo will be cropped. At least in Photoshop I can add sky/wall/grass/carpet/curtain to a horizontal photo to match the correct ratio so a 4x6 can be an 8x10 without cropping anyone out or having a blank space. But a horizontal to a vertical? Only very rarely will that work and it'll usually look odd.

I've also had requests to "turn them around so they face the camera."
"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." — Douglas Adams