A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)

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Hillia:
I think a lot of this 'That's unacceptable' or 'That won't work for me' is an example of a good thing - assertiveness training - run amok.  I remember maybe 20 years ago buying a Jack Canfield audiocassette series (Jack Canfield is the original editor of the 'Chicken Soup' series of inspirational books, and also a motivational speaker).  I can remember very distinctly on one of his self-help tapes his advice to calmly say 'That's unacceptable' when you're presented with an outcome that you don't want, and to just stand there repeating it (calmly and politely) until you get what you want. 

On ehell we often go with the broken record response to unreasonable requests ('I'm sorry, that won't be possible') which is kind of the flip side of this, but Jack's point was that everyone in the universe not only had the ability but also the responsibility to provide you with the outcome you wanted in every interaction, and if  you just stood there long enough repeating your mantra, you would eventually get what you want.  I can see this up to a point; certainly there are times when people just blow you off.  No refund for your raw chicken dish in a restaurant?  I'm sorry, that's not acceptable.  But you have to temper that with some common sense; if the manager absolutely refuses and is about to call the police, choose your battles and hit Yelp as soon as you get home.

MissRose:
I had a customer call in and ask us "Can you locate all of our email on your servers and send it on to us?" after we had an issue with the servers that held up mail delivery and the servers were fixed.

Nice try...  we have too many mail servers and try to find all of the mail that belonged to her? She had 20+ email accounts too.

Elfmama:
As background, I'm going to babble about my hobby here, the Society for Creative Anachronism. We are a non-profit group that researches and recreates the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with about 40,000 members worldwide. 

In the Society, I am a herald.  My job is to help people create a persona, a person who could have lived in that era, complete with a name and a coat of arms.   All name components must be documentable to the Society's time period.  Such name and arms are submitted to the Laurel King of Arms, the Society officer who registers them so that no one can use a name or arms that are too similar. 

As part of the paperwork to register a name, people have a number of choices.  One of them is an option to have a name modified to make it authentic for a certain language, culture, and/or time period.  So if you submit "Alice Smith" but ask to have it changed into a form authentic for 14th century France, we can do that. 

OK, end of background.  Where the impossible patron requests come into the story is when people submit a name that is impossible to modify in the form requested.  The patron loves the Russian name "Olga" but wants to have it changed to the 10th century Irish form, as if all names have a counterpart in all other languages in all time periods.  Or wants "Willow of the Fairy Hills" because it's her favorite name from a certain bodice-ripper fantasy romance, but has no documentation whatsoever to prove that it is a name actually used by humans in period.  And again, she wants it made authentic for medieval Irish.  We have concluded that what the patrons really want is for us to wave our Magic Herald Wands and change history, so that Olga and Willow really ARE period Irish names.

snowdragon:

--- Quote from: Elfmama on August 05, 2013, 11:15:36 PM ---As background, I'm going to babble about my hobby here, the Society for Creative Anachronism. We are a non-profit group that researches and recreates the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with about 40,000 members worldwide. 

In the Society, I am a herald.  My job is to help people create a persona, a person who could have lived in that era, complete with a name and a coat of arms.   All name components must be documentable to the Society's time period.  Such name and arms are submitted to the Laurel King of Arms, the Society officer who registers them so that no one can use a name or arms that are too similar. 

As part of the paperwork to register a name, people have a number of choices.  One of them is an option to have a name modified to make it authentic for a certain language, culture, and/or time period.  So if you submit "Alice Smith" but ask to have it changed into a form authentic for 14th century France, we can do that. 

OK, end of background.  Where the impossible patron requests come into the story is when people submit a name that is impossible to modify in the form requested.  The patron loves the Russian name "Olga" but wants to have it changed to the 10th century Irish form, as if all names have a counterpart in all other languages in all time periods.  Or wants "Willow of the Fairy Hills" because it's her favorite name from a certain bodice-ripper fantasy romance, but has no documentation whatsoever to prove that it is a name actually used by humans in period.  And again, she wants it made authentic for medieval Irish.  We have concluded that what the patrons really want is for us to wave our Magic Herald Wands and change history, so that Olga and Willow really ARE period Irish names.

--- End quote ---


Could the character be the daughter of an Irish woman and a Viking man? since the name is also Scandinavian it could work 

Nibsey:

--- Quote from: snowdragon on August 05, 2013, 11:27:52 PM ---
--- Quote from: Elfmama on August 05, 2013, 11:15:36 PM ---As background, I'm going to babble about my hobby here, the Society for Creative Anachronism. We are a non-profit group that researches and recreates the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with about 40,000 members worldwide. 

In the Society, I am a herald.  My job is to help people create a persona, a person who could have lived in that era, complete with a name and a coat of arms.   All name components must be documentable to the Society's time period.  Such name and arms are submitted to the Laurel King of Arms, the Society officer who registers them so that no one can use a name or arms that are too similar. 

As part of the paperwork to register a name, people have a number of choices.  One of them is an option to have a name modified to make it authentic for a certain language, culture, and/or time period.  So if you submit "Alice Smith" but ask to have it changed into a form authentic for 14th century France, we can do that. 

OK, end of background.  Where the impossible patron requests come into the story is when people submit a name that is impossible to modify in the form requested.  The patron loves the Russian name "Olga" but wants to have it changed to the 10th century Irish form, as if all names have a counterpart in all other languages in all time periods.  Or wants "Willow of the Fairy Hills" because it's her favorite name from a certain bodice-ripper fantasy romance, but has no documentation whatsoever to prove that it is a name actually used by humans in period.  And again, she wants it made authentic for medieval Irish.  We have concluded that what the patrons really want is for us to wave our Magic Herald Wands and change history, so that Olga and Willow really ARE period Irish names.

--- End quote ---


Could the character be the daughter of an Irish woman and a Viking man? since the name is also Scandinavian it could work

--- End quote ---

Would Iona work? It kind of rhymes (ok not really, just with my accent  ::) ) with Olga and they both mean blessed?

The Irish for Willow is saileach but I have never ever seen it used as a name.

Poor you  >:(

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