News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • August 23, 2017, 03:04:36 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)  (Read 1384249 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Midnight Kitty

  • The Queen of Sludge
  • Member
  • Posts: 2310
    • The Stoddard's Hale
I read a lot of fiction and enjoy both science and historical fiction.  I would recommend the students read almost anything written by Michael Crichton for fictional technology.  There are a couple other authors (James Rollins comes to mind) where technology is an integral part of the plot.  In fact, I found several novels just be querying my state library catalog on line.  I thought HS students knew how to google.
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

Firecat

  • Member
  • Posts: 2680
I was taught (back in the stone age) that fiction = false (made up) and non fiction = real life.  I love the elementary school librarian at our school, but I don't think she really teaches much beyond introducing books to the kids and instead of the kids browsing the shelves to pick out their book each week, she sets out a selection on a table they can pick from.  The problem is my DD is 2 grades above in her reading skills (her summer reading, besides some basic Junie B. Jones books was Charlotte's Web, The Secret Garden, and she is finishing Peter Pan..she is 7).

Back to Impossible requests..the last place I worked, we made rubber stamps.  A gentleman (who looked quite normal) came in and wanted an address stamp.  Co worker pulls out the book of sizes/styles and he looks at her and says "You don't already have them made up?"  ??? :o  My co workers face was priceless !  She had to explain that customized stamps, like one with his name and address were not pre made, but he couldn't understand why we couldn't just look on the shelf and argued that he shouldn't have to wait (48 hr turn around) .  He finally stormed out and we just about bust a gut laughing.  She said "What does he think?  We take the phone book out every year and make every one a stamp in case they come in?????

This kind of thing really annoyed me as a kid. I hated it when people (teachers or librarians) tried to tell me what I could or couldn't read based on my age. Especially because my mother never restricted my reading; she'd tell me she didn't think I was ready for something yet, but not that I wasn't "allowed" to read it. So it was really galling when a teacher or school librarian tried to do that. It usually didn't last long, either, because Mom would meet with them and inform them in no uncertain terms that a) they were to allow me to check out whatever I darn well pleased and b) she was never, ever going to freak out about what I brought home from the library...unless they violated the first of those two rules.

Elfmama

  • Member
  • Posts: 4594
  • Derailing threads since 2001!
I was taught (back in the stone age) that fiction = false (made up) and non fiction = real life.  I love the elementary school librarian at our school, but I don't think she really teaches much beyond introducing books to the kids and instead of the kids browsing the shelves to pick out their book each week, she sets out a selection on a table they can pick from.  The problem is my DD is 2 grades above in her reading skills (her summer reading, besides some basic Junie B. Jones books was Charlotte's Web, The Secret Garden, and she is finishing Peter Pan..she is 7).

This kind of thing really annoyed me as a kid. I hated it when people (teachers or librarians) tried to tell me what I could or couldn't read based on my age. Especially because my mother never restricted my reading; she'd tell me she didn't think I was ready for something yet, but not that I wasn't "allowed" to read it. So it was really galling when a teacher or school librarian tried to do that. It usually didn't last long, either, because Mom would meet with them and inform them in no uncertain terms that a) they were to allow me to check out whatever I darn well pleased and b) she was never, ever going to freak out about what I brought home from the library...unless they violated the first of those two rules.
My mother did too.  And one of the other ladies in our small town was shocked!  "But what if she checks out Gone With The Wind?  You know that it has the D word in it! And there was that scene where Scarlett killed the Yankee and Melanie took off her nightgown to wrap around his head.  She was (whispered) NAKED!"

Mom said "She doesn't need to check it out.  I have a copy, and she's read it already.  If she understands something, then she's ready to read about it.  If she doesn't understand, it won't hurt her."
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Library Dragon

  • Member
  • Posts: 1440
I only had kindergartners and first graders do this the first couple of weeks of school.  It was more about teaching them the checkout process.  After that they had a wide range of books. 

The tastes of young readers varies so widely that they need a large selection.  At my school we had a lot of young engineers whose tastes were totally different than mine.  Removing self-selection quickly becomes a barrier to the love of reading.

-----

On thread topic.....

Today we just started advertising for a new aide.  Multiple times today, 'Thank you for the application. No, I cannot tell you what your chances for the job are.  I have to evaluate all the applications.  No, I cannot tell you who else has applied.'

My thoughts during one conversation: I'm not going to put you to the head of the list because you just got fired because your boss accused you of theft and you R E A L L Y need the job.  Oh and I'll find an arrest record for writing bad checks...... 'Please write that down so I'll have the full explanation.'

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

Jocelyn

  • Member
  • Posts: 2013
Mom said "She doesn't need to check it out.  I have a copy, and she's read it already.  If she understands something, then she's ready to read about it.  If she doesn't understand, it won't hurt her."
That may have been true in the past...but a lot of books now present more graphic sexuality than I'd want a child to be reading. I read TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD at 7 or 8, and completely missed what the trial was all about. But I'm not sure we could say that a child could emerge so befuddled from modern bodice-rippers. I remember the first racy novel I read- on a church youth group trip, borrowed from the sponsor, even!  By that time I was perfectly well aware of what those euphemisms were, but it seems to me that authors are leaving less to the imagination these days. I don't think I've ready about turgid members in awhile.  ::)

Elfmama

  • Member
  • Posts: 4594
  • Derailing threads since 2001!
Mom said "She doesn't need to check it out.  I have a copy, and she's read it already.  If she understands something, then she's ready to read about it.  If she doesn't understand, it won't hurt her."
That may have been true in the past...but a lot of books now present more graphic sexuality than I'd want a child to be reading. I read TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD at 7 or 8, and completely missed what the trial was all about. But I'm not sure we could say that a child could emerge so befuddled from modern bodice-rippers. I remember the first racy novel I read- on a church youth group trip, borrowed from the sponsor, even!  By that time I was perfectly well aware of what those euphemisms were, but it seems to me that authors are leaving less to the imagination these days. I don't think I've ready about turgid members in awhile.  ::)
True.  At that time (mid 1960's), the raciest adult books available in the library might have a dreadfully naughty passage like this: "The silk of her nightgown whispered to the floor as Kirk took her in his arms. ***  "  Actual mention of naughty bits, whether in euphemisms or plain Anglo-Saxon terms, kicked it firmly into porn territory, something one did NOT see at a public library.  Especially a small-town library staffed by a little old lady librarian who segregated children's books into "boys' books" and "girls' books."  It really disturbed her that I consistently chose from the "boys' books" and occasioned her first call to my mother.  I didn't want to read about sissy girls who wanted to be ballet dancers or nurses -- I wanted the GOOD stuff!  Heinlein juveniles, Andre Norton, any other SF or fantasy I could get my hands on.  I first read 1984 at 12, Animal Farm at 10.  (Little old library lady saw "talking animals" and figured "kids' book!")
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Firecat

  • Member
  • Posts: 2680
Mom said "She doesn't need to check it out.  I have a copy, and she's read it already.  If she understands something, then she's ready to read about it.  If she doesn't understand, it won't hurt her."
That may have been true in the past...but a lot of books now present more graphic sexuality than I'd want a child to be reading. I read TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD at 7 or 8, and completely missed what the trial was all about. But I'm not sure we could say that a child could emerge so befuddled from modern bodice-rippers. I remember the first racy novel I read- on a church youth group trip, borrowed from the sponsor, even!  By that time I was perfectly well aware of what those euphemisms were, but it seems to me that authors are leaving less to the imagination these days. I don't think I've ready about turgid members in awhile.  ::)

And that's totally your decision to make for your hypothetical (or actual) child(ren). With the bodice rippers and such, my mom would just have told me that she didn't think I was ready for those yet. I'd probably have found them pretty boring before age 12 or so, because I wasn't ready for it yet. Mom also knew that the bigger a deal she made out of not "allowing" me to read something, the more determined I'd be to read it. By not putting restrictions on my reading, but just gently steering, she built my trust in her advice. Other kids may be different, but it worked with me.

I will say that one conversation between my mom and the mother of another student at my elementary school was amusing. The other mother called my mom, trying to get Mom's support for pulling the Judy Blume book Are You There, God - It's Me, Margaret? from the school library because it talked about puberty from a girl's point of view. So then Mom asked her if she'd actually read the book. "Well, no, but our minister said...." and it either went downhill or got funnier from there, depending on your point of view  >:D

Slartibartfast

  • Member
  • Posts: 10740
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!


I'm all for kids reading whatever interests them, regardless of content, but I definitely learned a few things accidentally.  "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" has a section which still gives me the willies, and "The Song of Mavin Manyshaped" uses rape as a character motivation in a way I wasn't able to deal with until my third or fourth time through the book.  Even the Pern series scared me off when I first read it in fifth grade, because there's an awful lot of sex in it - may have been tastefully done, but the whole concept was still icky to me when I was ten  :)  That said, there are racy passages in plenty of famous historical books - Gulliver's Travels has a section (cut out in the children's abridged version) where Gulliver urinates on a fire to put it out, for example.  Kids are very good at figuring out what their comfort level is and staying more or less within it.

gmatoy

  • Member
  • Posts: 2915
My mother was also a "let her read" mom.  I was just getting fluent at reading (second grade, so about 7 1/2 years old) and was reading the town's newspaper. I couldn't figure out what a word meant, so I called out to my mother to ask her. She was talking to the neighbor, and did not miss a beat, "I'll be in in a moment and will explain it to you when I get in."
She turned back to the neighbor and excused herself. The neighbor was having a fit, "You are going to tell her what that word means?!!!" 
My mother told her, "I'm going to explain it in words she'll be able to understand."

The word? Rape.

And my mother did explain it so I understood.

And I'm wondering how many people learned to read adult books by reading Reader's Digest Condensed books? My mother would hand me the volume and tell me , "I'd prefer it if you wouldn't read 'Title.' " And I wouldn't read that one, because she trusted me!


MommyPenguin

  • Member
  • Posts: 4128
    • My blog!
I'm definitely in that spot now, where I have a 6-year-old who loves to read and wants to read everything she sees.  It can be hard finding books that match both her reading level *and* her maturity.  The maturity thing isn't just about stuff I think is too adult (violence, sex, whatever) for her, but also how well she'll understand things that are concepts she just hasn't learned yet.  One can certainly learn certain things from books, but some things are just too big a jump.  There is a sensitivity issue as well, though.  We ran into something recently that talked about Chinese foot-binding.  She was so horrified she started screaming and crying.  I felt like a terrible mother for letting it come up.
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
Jenny is 8 years old!  10/08
Charlotte is 7 years old!  8/10
Megan is 4 years old!  10/12
Lydia is 2 years old!  12/14

greencat

  • Member
  • Posts: 3899
  • Trap...Neuter...What was that third thing again?
I provide tech support for a certain number of computer resources at a large organization.  Another department - literally another department, they're not part of the same branch of the organization at all, and are located a good mile away from where I sit during the day - provides support for a group of computer resources which is connected with the part I support, but is separate.  I have no access to the system, and my only experience with it was with the old version we used four years ago when I was an end user rather than being on the support end.  I have no way of providing any kind of support for the service.  Quite frequently, we get callers who insist that I can, in fact, help them, and should help them, or at least transfer them to someone special who can help them, when all I can actually do is transfer them to the correct support department.

Today was extremely frustrating for everyone involved - a system partially collapsed under the strain of suddenly supporting 100000 simultaneous log-ins (someone had the bright idea of uniting the sign-on process for my department's system and the previously mentioned department's systems, which is much more convenient for the users, but introduced a massive load problem on the servers today when it all kicked in.)  The sysadmins spent their day performing an emergency doubling of the number of servers handling the requests - I spent my day telling people that yes, the system was down, and no, I didn't know when it would be back up other than "soon," and that the only suggestion I had for them was to try the system again later, and that their "supervisors" should be understanding of the issue because they were also affected by it.

Mel the Redcap

  • Scheming Foreign Hussy married to a Good Ethnic Boy!
  • Member
  • Posts: 2176
This kind of thing really annoyed me as a kid. I hated it when people (teachers or librarians) tried to tell me what I could or couldn't read based on my age. Especially because my mother never restricted my reading; she'd tell me she didn't think I was ready for something yet, but not that I wasn't "allowed" to read it. So it was really galling when a teacher or school librarian tried to do that. It usually didn't last long, either, because Mom would meet with them and inform them in no uncertain terms that a) they were to allow me to check out whatever I darn well pleased and b) she was never, ever going to freak out about what I brought home from the library...unless they violated the first of those two rules.

My mother did too.  And one of the other ladies in our small town was shocked!  "But what if she checks out Gone With The Wind?  You know that it has the D word in it! And there was that scene where Scarlett killed the Yankee and Melanie took off her nightgown to wrap around his head.  She was (whispered) NAKED!"

Mom said "She doesn't need to check it out.  I have a copy, and she's read it already.  If she understands something, then she's ready to read about it.  If she doesn't understand, it won't hurt her."

...that was seriously the worst thing she could think of for you to check out? ::) >:D
"Set aphasia to stun!"

Mediancat

  • Shibboleth of Shadowland
  • Member
  • Posts: 130
I think the only thing my mom stopped me from reading were a couple of my Father's x-rated novels. Otherwise, whether it was comic books, reference books, or the Great Brain series, I was good. I was reading her Doonesbury collections when I was 7 years old.

I still have them.

Rob
"In all of mankind's history, there has never been more damage done than by someone who 'thought they were doing the right thing'." -- Lucy, Peanuts

gingerzing

  • Member
  • Posts: 1271
This is a fun conversation.  Especially as a daughter of a librarian. 
My mom pretty much gave me full access to whatever I wanted to read.  Comics? Fine.  (especially since I had 3 other books that were chapter books) 
The only bit of trouble she had with me was when Judy Blume was extremely popular.  I was about 11/12 and I think my friends and I had read everything she had out.  Her new book had been out for a while and Mom said "Not at this time."  Of course, I just heard no.  So within about a month I was reading the new book, "Forever".  Mom caught me and sighed.  We talked a bit and she asked if I had any questions about the subject.  Later Mom told me that she really had hoped that I would have waited until I was in high school to read it.  Meh. 
Of course in junior high (about age13/14), I had a classmate try to get me into trouble with the teacher because I was reading one of Paul Zindel's books. 

Hillia

  • Member
  • Posts: 3330
I was in 7th grade when Jaws, the novel, came out.  There was one copy passed breathlessly around our grade, because of Chapter 7.  In this chapter, Mrs. Brody has an assignation with Hooper.  It's very mild; in fact, most of the chapter is spent on the logistics of the thing: how she packs extra clothes when she leaves the house for her volunteer work, leaves early, stops to change clothes, etc.  There's a page or two of painful flirtation, and then *poof*, she's back at home with Chief Brody.  I think I was the only one to skim chapter 7 in favor of more shark-related gore.