Author Topic: Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)  (Read 675611 times)

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MommyPenguin

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I'm definitely in that spot now, where I have a 6-year-old who loves to read and wants to read everything she sees.  It can be hard finding books that match both her reading level *and* her maturity.  The maturity thing isn't just about stuff I think is too adult (violence, sex, whatever) for her, but also how well she'll understand things that are concepts she just hasn't learned yet.  One can certainly learn certain things from books, but some things are just too big a jump.  There is a sensitivity issue as well, though.  We ran into something recently that talked about Chinese foot-binding.  She was so horrified she started screaming and crying.  I felt like a terrible mother for letting it come up.

greencat

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I provide tech support for a certain number of computer resources at a large organization.  Another department - literally another department, they're not part of the same branch of the organization at all, and are located a good mile away from where I sit during the day - provides support for a group of computer resources which is connected with the part I support, but is separate.  I have no access to the system, and my only experience with it was with the old version we used four years ago when I was an end user rather than being on the support end.  I have no way of providing any kind of support for the service.  Quite frequently, we get callers who insist that I can, in fact, help them, and should help them, or at least transfer them to someone special who can help them, when all I can actually do is transfer them to the correct support department.

Today was extremely frustrating for everyone involved - a system partially collapsed under the strain of suddenly supporting 100000 simultaneous log-ins (someone had the bright idea of uniting the sign-on process for my department's system and the previously mentioned department's systems, which is much more convenient for the users, but introduced a massive load problem on the servers today when it all kicked in.)  The sysadmins spent their day performing an emergency doubling of the number of servers handling the requests - I spent my day telling people that yes, the system was down, and no, I didn't know when it would be back up other than "soon," and that the only suggestion I had for them was to try the system again later, and that their "supervisors" should be understanding of the issue because they were also affected by it.

Mel the Redcap

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This kind of thing really annoyed me as a kid. I hated it when people (teachers or librarians) tried to tell me what I could or couldn't read based on my age. Especially because my mother never restricted my reading; she'd tell me she didn't think I was ready for something yet, but not that I wasn't "allowed" to read it. So it was really galling when a teacher or school librarian tried to do that. It usually didn't last long, either, because Mom would meet with them and inform them in no uncertain terms that a) they were to allow me to check out whatever I darn well pleased and b) she was never, ever going to freak out about what I brought home from the library...unless they violated the first of those two rules.

My mother did too.  And one of the other ladies in our small town was shocked!  "But what if she checks out Gone With The Wind?  You know that it has the D word in it! And there was that scene where Scarlett killed the Yankee and Melanie took off her nightgown to wrap around his head.  She was (whispered) NAKED!"

Mom said "She doesn't need to check it out.  I have a copy, and she's read it already.  If she understands something, then she's ready to read about it.  If she doesn't understand, it won't hurt her."

...that was seriously the worst thing she could think of for you to check out? ::) >:D
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Mediancat

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I think the only thing my mom stopped me from reading were a couple of my Father's x-rated novels. Otherwise, whether it was comic books, reference books, or the Great Brain series, I was good. I was reading her Doonesbury collections when I was 7 years old.

I still have them.

Rob
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gingerzing

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This is a fun conversation.  Especially as a daughter of a librarian. 
My mom pretty much gave me full access to whatever I wanted to read.  Comics? Fine.  (especially since I had 3 other books that were chapter books) 
The only bit of trouble she had with me was when Judy Blume was extremely popular.  I was about 11/12 and I think my friends and I had read everything she had out.  Her new book had been out for a while and Mom said "Not at this time."  Of course, I just heard no.  So within about a month I was reading the new book, "Forever".  Mom caught me and sighed.  We talked a bit and she asked if I had any questions about the subject.  Later Mom told me that she really had hoped that I would have waited until I was in high school to read it.  Meh. 
Of course in junior high (about age13/14), I had a classmate try to get me into trouble with the teacher because I was reading one of Paul Zindel's books. 

Hillia

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I was in 7th grade when Jaws, the novel, came out.  There was one copy passed breathlessly around our grade, because of Chapter 7.  In this chapter, Mrs. Brody has an assignation with Hooper.  It's very mild; in fact, most of the chapter is spent on the logistics of the thing: how she packs extra clothes when she leaves the house for her volunteer work, leaves early, stops to change clothes, etc.  There's a page or two of painful flirtation, and then *poof*, she's back at home with Chief Brody.  I think I was the only one to skim chapter 7 in favor of more shark-related gore.

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hjaye

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I was in high school when the Godfather came out.  Since the movie was such a big hit, people started to read the book.

They found the book was a lot racier than the movie, and had a more detailed story line, (as most books do)

I was reading the book and a friend came up and saw me reading, he asked if he could see the book, I gave it to him, he turned to a certain page, looked at the passage, I believe it was a racy scene of Sonny having s*x with his mistress while he was standing up.

My friend just said something like yup, it's on page 127 (or whatever page it was) and gave the book back to me.

magicdomino

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My mother was also a "let her read" mom.  I was just getting fluent at reading (second grade, so about 7 1/2 years old) and was reading the town's newspaper. I couldn't figure out what a word meant, so I called out to my mother to ask her. She was talking to the neighbor, and did not miss a beat, "I'll be in in a moment and will explain it to you when I get in."
She turned back to the neighbor and excused herself. The neighbor was having a fit, "You are going to tell her what that word means?!!!" 
My mother told her, "I'm going to explain it in words she'll be able to understand."

The word? Rape.

And my mother did explain it so I understood.

And I'm wondering how many people learned to read adult books by reading Reader's Digest Condensed books? My mother would hand me the volume and tell me , "I'd prefer it if you wouldn't read 'Title.' " And I wouldn't read that one, because she trusted me!

You're lucky that your mother was able to explain.  My mother launched into the Birds and the Bees talk.   ::)  I gave up and looked up "rape" in the dictionary. 

My reading was never censored, but part of that might be because my mother didn't realize that I was reading "those" kind of books.  One of my brothers left behind some interesting choices.   :o  On the other hand, "The Sexually Adequate Male" was more informative than Mother's Bird and the Bees talk.   :D

cwm

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My mother was also a "let her read" mom.  I was just getting fluent at reading (second grade, so about 7 1/2 years old) and was reading the town's newspaper. I couldn't figure out what a word meant, so I called out to my mother to ask her. She was talking to the neighbor, and did not miss a beat, "I'll be in in a moment and will explain it to you when I get in."
She turned back to the neighbor and excused herself. The neighbor was having a fit, "You are going to tell her what that word means?!!!" 
My mother told her, "I'm going to explain it in words she'll be able to understand."

The word? Rape.

And my mother did explain it so I understood.

And I'm wondering how many people learned to read adult books by reading Reader's Digest Condensed books? My mother would hand me the volume and tell me , "I'd prefer it if you wouldn't read 'Title.' " And I wouldn't read that one, because she trusted me!

You're lucky that your mother was able to explain.  My mother launched into the Birds and the Bees talk.   ::)  I gave up and looked up "rape" in the dictionary. 

My reading was never censored, but part of that might be because my mother didn't realize that I was reading "those" kind of books.  One of my brothers left behind some interesting choices.   :o  On the other hand, "The Sexually Adequate Male" was more informative than Mother's Bird and the Bees talk.   :D

My mom was a very permissive mom as well. I could read almost any Stephen King book by middle school, provided I wasn't too scared. The one book I wasn't allowed to read was Gerald's Game. So what did I do? Sat behind the couch (where the bookshelf was, where I usually read "adult" books) and read it. All of it. And boy, did I learn a few things.

I did a book report on The Tommyknockers in 8th grade. My teacher was horrified that I'd even been allowed to read it, but my mom defended me. And according to my 5th grade computerized testing, at that age I was reading beyond a 12th grade level. It wasn't so much beyond my ability to read as beyond my ability to not be afraid to go to sleep at night.

Outdoor Girl

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My parents were 'Let her read' parents, too.  I read so many books in a week that they couldn't censor what I read; they trusted me to put down any book I didn't like/didn't think I should be reading.  I was allowed to take out multiple books each week in the school library, because otherwise, I was asking to go in when it wasn't our class' turn.  I did a read-a-thon for MS one May.  Grade 3, I think it was.  I read a book a day that month.  I got through the first 31 books in the Hardy Boy series in the library.   ;D

My Dad was a 7th grade teacher.  He did a lesson on censorship and asked the class about their reading habits and was anyone reading so many books that their parents couldn't keep up.  Everyone turned and looked at this one poor girl.  So he asked her what she did when she got to a part of the book she didn't like/understand/think she should reading.  She said she either skipped ahead or quit reading the book.  The class apparently went on to have a really good discussion.
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jedikaiti

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This is a fun conversation.  Especially as a daughter of a librarian. 
My mom pretty much gave me full access to whatever I wanted to read.  Comics? Fine.  (especially since I had 3 other books that were chapter books) 
The only bit of trouble she had with me was when Judy Blume was extremely popular.  I was about 11/12 and I think my friends and I had read everything she had out.  Her new book had been out for a while and Mom said "Not at this time."  Of course, I just heard no.  So within about a month I was reading the new book, "Forever".  Mom caught me and sighed.  We talked a bit and she asked if I had any questions about the subject.  Later Mom told me that she really had hoped that I would have waited until I was in high school to read it.  Meh. 
Of course in junior high (about age13/14), I had a classmate try to get me into trouble with the teacher because I was reading one of Paul Zindel's books.

My parents also gave me free reign in the book world, but I preferred Pat Oliphant to Doonesbury. :-) I did scare a librarian when I asked for books about witches when I was in 3rd grade. She tried to steer me towards kids books about fictional witches, but I said no, I wanted books about real witches. She seemed a bit nervous, but showed me where to find them.

When I was in 7th grade, my band teacher caught me reading The Outsiders (SE Hinton) and asked if my parents knew I was reading that. I replied that it was my 3rd copy, as it had been a favorite book since 2nd grade.

As for Paul Zindel, I really loved The Pigman (I think I first read it around 4th or 5th grade). I was really annoyed in 7th grade, when we were assigned something lame to read, and the 8th graders got to read The Pigman. Then I got to 8th grade, again got something lame, and the 7th graders got something like The Outsiders. Grr!
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z_squared82

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I work for a law firm. As I used to be a journalist, I’ve become the go to person for tracking people down.

I had an attorney ask me to call National Organization to see if they would give me the contact info for a person who had complained on the National Organization’s site about a business we were suing. Said National Organization’s privacy policy is right there, in easy-to-read language, on the site.

I told him, “Well, I can spend the time on it if you want me to, but I can tell you right now the answer is No.”

He wanted me to spend the time on it anyway.

National Organization’s answer was No.

NyaChan

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My mom was weird - I could read any and all of her books that I could find, including ones involving murder/rape/swear words, but I checked out a Nora Roberts once from the library and she confiscated it  ::)  I still don't get the logic, the best I could come up with was that she doesn't consider those books to have literary value to make the "stuff" worth reading. 

Goosey

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I love reading these stories, but can we step away from discussion of everyone's reading adventures?

Maybe there should be a spin off of who was reading what scandalous/complicated novel at what age. :)

Margo

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My parents were also 'let them read' parents - I remember being somewhat bemused when I found out that lots of my friends were not allowed to read 'Forever' and were shocked that I didn't feel the need to hide it when i read it.

My grandmother had a slight run-in with my mother's school, when my mum was about 13; the school (which was a boarding school) tried to say that my mum wasn't allowed to borrow books from the adult section of the town library. Unfortunately for them,  they were too mealy-mouthed to admit that they were worried about what she might read, and instead claimed it was because they didn't want to be responsible for any library fines she might incur. So my grandparents told them not to worry, they'd sign the forms and it would be them not the school who would be responsible...

We had so many books at home that I don't think it would have been very practical to try to censor our reading.