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Author Topic: Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)  (Read 1478548 times)

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Coralreef

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We are a chemical company and we do toll compounding.  A customer will come to us with his "recipe" and we make and package his product.  Sometimes, the customer will ask us to develop a product for them.  They come in with a list of what they want the product to do.  I've had quite a few that want their products to :

Clean everything under the sun, from asphalt on the car paint to baby's diapers with a single product that has to be : biodegradable, organic, nontoxic, noncorrosive, nonflammable, inexpensive.  All at the same time  ::)  I once suggested they spit on the stain and wipe with their sleeves, army style. Good thing my boss has a sense of humour.   
"It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Office coffee cup.

Twik

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Better yet, how about the people who want "no chemicals" in their product.

"You want to sell an empty bottle?"
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Ms_Cellany

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  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
We are a chemical company and we do toll compounding.  A customer will come to us with his "recipe" and we make and package his product.  Sometimes, the customer will ask us to develop a product for them.  They come in with a list of what they want the product to do.  I've had quite a few that want their products to :

Clean everything under the sun, from asphalt on the car paint to baby's diapers with a single product that has to be : biodegradable, organic, nontoxic, noncorrosive, nonflammable, inexpensive.  All at the same time  ::)  I once suggested they spit on the stain and wipe with their sleeves, army style. Good thing my boss has a sense of humour.   

Time to formulate them some Dihydrogen Monoxide.
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.

Coralreef

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Better yet, how about the people who want "no chemicals" in their product.

"You want to sell an empty bottle?"

May I steal this?  I'll let you know when I get to use it  >:D
"It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Office coffee cup.

andi

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We are a chemical company and we do toll compounding.  A customer will come to us with his "recipe" and we make and package his product.  Sometimes, the customer will ask us to develop a product for them.  They come in with a list of what they want the product to do.  I've had quite a few that want their products to :

Clean everything under the sun, from asphalt on the car paint to baby's diapers with a single product that has to be : biodegradable, organic, nontoxic, noncorrosive, nonflammable, inexpensive.  All at the same time  ::)  I once suggested they spit on the stain and wipe with their sleeves, army style. Good thing my boss has a sense of humour.

Mommy spit does it all

CakeEater

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My younger sister started piano lessons because the Ed. Psych said she would benefit from doing something which she would find frustrating! (I assume frustrating as is 'you actually have to work to learn it, you can't just sit down and do it right the very first .)
:o :o :o   Then the Ed. Psych uses "frustrating" in a completely different fashion than the rest of the English-speaking world. 

frus∑trate transitive verb \ˈfrəs-ˌtrāt\ 
: to cause (someone) to feel angry, discouraged, or upset because of not being able to do something
: to prevent (efforts, plans, etc.) from succeeding
: to keep (someone) from doing something

 Why in the world would you want your child to be angry, discouraged, and upset? How could that possibly benefit her?

Maybe the word they wanted is "challenging."

Our daughter received her first B in college. Seriously! She was very, very upset. We honestly felt it was kind of a help for her to see what she considered a failure. She was never cocky or snotty about her straight A forever as a child or young adult, but she still needed to feel "failure", as she saw it.

Why did we see it that way? I can't articulate the reason.

Yes - kids who can do seemingly everything will sometimes lack perspective and character if they never have to deal with frustration when learning something. Better they learn how to deal with it playing piano at age 10 (or whatever) than in important exams age 17.

Frustration can be an excellent thing.

gmatoy

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"Silly Sally went to town, walking backwards, upside down..."

Off-track, but I love this book!! I read it one time slowly, showing the pictures and then I read it faster each time for two or three times. Students love it and they get the idea of fluency.

RegionMom

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  • ♪♫ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪♫ ♪ ♪♪♫ ♪♫ ♪♫
Perhaps I need to frustrate the mom!

I have had the mom sit in on lessons, and she did yoga poses instead of paying attention!   :o

I have shown her the pages to do, labeled and flagged, color penciled, dated, etc...That is when she says, "Oh, I jsut do not know music at all, so she has to do it all on her own."  child is 7.  I have junior high students with parents that could not tell a quarter note from a quart of milk, but they read the assignment notebook and check the pages and listen to the child play on occasion!

As for reading notes, the G clef/treble clef looks like a weird old fashioned cursive letter G.  It makes contact in four places on one line, the second line up.  This marks the G line.  ANY note, whether a quarter note, half note, etc...on this line, will be a G.

For the bass clef/F clef, that funny large dot that then swirls out like a comma with two smaller dots next to it mark the second line down on the lower stave.  The line it marks is the F line, so any note of any duration on that line will be an F.

There are only seven letters in the music alphabet, so you can count the steps up or down to figure out the rest if you just cannot remember anything else.  Yes, there are sharps and flats, and special markings, and fingerings and vocabulary and all that jazz, but...that will come later.

I have taught beginning piano to dozens of students, for several years.  This ONE student I just have not found the magical key...yet...

(It may very well be the mom- the girl also takes stylized horse riding lessons, and they left the week before spring break to go on a very fancy ski vacation.  Mom did not make it to the Christmas recital because she was hosting a fancy party.  I convinced her to have another family member bring the child to play.   Perhaps it is a case of "poor little rich girl.")
 
« Last Edit: March 25, 2014, 09:16:18 PM by RegionMom »
Fear is temporary...Regret is forever.

Sirius

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I was in piano 12 years and, although I progressed, it was slow and painful. I had a very difficult time "getting" music, my brain just doesn't work that way. It irks me today when I hear other mothers talking about how their kids simply have to learn piano because if they don't, the kids will never succeed in life (paraphrased). But, yeah, the least the kid could do is work in the piano theory book.

I could NEVER read music to save my hide.  Good thing I never had to use that skill in real life!

I've always seen reading music (not piano necessarily, just music in general) kind of like swimming: once you know how, you can't fathom how some other people can't.  If you've never learned, though, it's a complete mystery why some people can be so casual about knowing it  :P

I do think a lot of adults know "notes on top sound higher than the notes on the bottom" - but there's a pretty wide gulf between that and actually *reading* music.

While I've played clarinet since I was 10, I have never been able to get the hang of reading bass clef notes.  I can read treble clef just fine, which is the range in which clarinets play.  Mr. Sirius tried to explain it to me - since he plays the piano it's like second nature to him.  Still don't get it, although I now know where middle C is. 

athersgeo

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I was in piano 12 years and, although I progressed, it was slow and painful. I had a very difficult time "getting" music, my brain just doesn't work that way. It irks me today when I hear other mothers talking about how their kids simply have to learn piano because if they don't, the kids will never succeed in life (paraphrased). But, yeah, the least the kid could do is work in the piano theory book.

I could NEVER read music to save my hide.  Good thing I never had to use that skill in real life!

I've always seen reading music (not piano necessarily, just music in general) kind of like swimming: once you know how, you can't fathom how some other people can't.  If you've never learned, though, it's a complete mystery why some people can be so casual about knowing it  :P

I do think a lot of adults know "notes on top sound higher than the notes on the bottom" - but there's a pretty wide gulf between that and actually *reading* music.

While I've played clarinet since I was 10, I have never been able to get the hang of reading bass clef notes.  I can read treble clef just fine, which is the range in which clarinets play.  Mr. Sirius tried to explain it to me - since he plays the piano it's like second nature to him.  Still don't get it, although I now know where middle C is.

That would be me - I learned to read the treble clef when I was six (recorder) and graduated to the clarinet at 11. When it came time to start music theory and learn the bass clef I was completely at sea and, in the end, that prevented me from going further with it.

I tend to liken it to learning a language - the younger you are when you learn it, the easier it is.

Luci

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...but she still needed to feel "failure", as she saw it.

Why did we see it that way? I can't articulate the reason.

Yes - kids who can do seemingly everything will sometimes lack perspective and character if they never have to deal with frustration when learning something.

Thank you for stating our feelings!

Twik

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I'd like to see children more dealing with "challenge" than "frustration".

If they face challenges, they learn that things can be overcome. If they're faced with frustration, they learn that there are some things that, no matter how hard they try, they can't do. While this is, in its way, a good lesson of its own, it's not something I would want my children to learn before they learn, "Step 1 Failure, Step 2 - analyse and repeat with corrections, Step X, success!".
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Thipu1

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I'd like to see children more dealing with "challenge" than "frustration".

If they face challenges, they learn that things can be overcome. If they're faced with frustration, they learn that there are some things that, no matter how hard they try, they can't do. While this is, in its way, a good lesson of its own, it's not something I would want my children to learn before they learn, "Step 1 Failure, Step 2 - analyse and repeat with corrections, Step X, success!".

I strongly agree that children need challenges rather than frustrations.  A little difficulty can be 'good for the humility', as a teacher of mine once said. 

We know a teenager like this.  He's getting either 'A's or 'F's in his High School courses.  If the
subject is one he knows and likes, he gets the A.  If it's one he doesn't already know and like, he absolutely refuses to do any work and gets the F.

  It's driving his parents to distraction but they're partly to blame.  This kid has never been told that
he is anything but the most perfect and intelligent person on the face of the earth. 

It's a sad situation because he'll be lucky if he gets into a college and he's certainly not ready for the rough and tumble of the working world. 

ladyknight1

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We also know two children (siblings) who are like that. Their father is a good parent and does his best, but according to the mother, they can do no wrong and are perfect angels. One is currently in a pretrial intervention program for drug use and theft and the other has been suspended from school for physical contact with another student during the school day.

I feel so bad for the father and the kids.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Coralreef

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I'd like to see children more dealing with "challenge" than "frustration".

If they face challenges, they learn that things can be overcome. If they're faced with frustration, they learn that there are some things that, no matter how hard they try, they can't do. While this is, in its way, a good lesson of its own, it's not something I would want my children to learn before they learn, "Step 1 Failure, Step 2 - analyse and repeat with corrections, Step X, success!".

This. Making mistakes is normal.  You have to learn from them and adapt. I found that lessons learned the hard way are rarely forgotten.  Of course, I would never compromise a child's safety or health to "life lessons", but consequences for actions (good or bad) are part of life. 
"It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Office coffee cup.