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  • November 18, 2017, 11:37:06 PM

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Author Topic: Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)  (Read 1478440 times)

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hjaye

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I was in high school when the Godfather came out.  Since the movie was such a big hit, people started to read the book.

They found the book was a lot racier than the movie, and had a more detailed story line, (as most books do)

I was reading the book and a friend came up and saw me reading, he asked if he could see the book, I gave it to him, he turned to a certain page, looked at the passage, I believe it was a racy scene of Sonny having s*x with his mistress while he was standing up.

My friend just said something like yup, it's on page 127 (or whatever page it was) and gave the book back to me.

magicdomino

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My mother was also a "let her read" mom.  I was just getting fluent at reading (second grade, so about 7 1/2 years old) and was reading the town's newspaper. I couldn't figure out what a word meant, so I called out to my mother to ask her. She was talking to the neighbor, and did not miss a beat, "I'll be in in a moment and will explain it to you when I get in."
She turned back to the neighbor and excused herself. The neighbor was having a fit, "You are going to tell her what that word means?!!!" 
My mother told her, "I'm going to explain it in words she'll be able to understand."

The word? Rape.

And my mother did explain it so I understood.

And I'm wondering how many people learned to read adult books by reading Reader's Digest Condensed books? My mother would hand me the volume and tell me , "I'd prefer it if you wouldn't read 'Title.' " And I wouldn't read that one, because she trusted me!

You're lucky that your mother was able to explain.  My mother launched into the Birds and the Bees talk.   ::)  I gave up and looked up "rape" in the dictionary. 

My reading was never censored, but part of that might be because my mother didn't realize that I was reading "those" kind of books.  One of my brothers left behind some interesting choices.   :o  On the other hand, "The Sexually Adequate Male" was more informative than Mother's Bird and the Bees talk.   :D

cwm

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My mother was also a "let her read" mom.  I was just getting fluent at reading (second grade, so about 7 1/2 years old) and was reading the town's newspaper. I couldn't figure out what a word meant, so I called out to my mother to ask her. She was talking to the neighbor, and did not miss a beat, "I'll be in in a moment and will explain it to you when I get in."
She turned back to the neighbor and excused herself. The neighbor was having a fit, "You are going to tell her what that word means?!!!" 
My mother told her, "I'm going to explain it in words she'll be able to understand."

The word? Rape.

And my mother did explain it so I understood.

And I'm wondering how many people learned to read adult books by reading Reader's Digest Condensed books? My mother would hand me the volume and tell me , "I'd prefer it if you wouldn't read 'Title.' " And I wouldn't read that one, because she trusted me!

You're lucky that your mother was able to explain.  My mother launched into the Birds and the Bees talk.   ::)  I gave up and looked up "rape" in the dictionary. 

My reading was never censored, but part of that might be because my mother didn't realize that I was reading "those" kind of books.  One of my brothers left behind some interesting choices.   :o  On the other hand, "The Sexually Adequate Male" was more informative than Mother's Bird and the Bees talk.   :D

My mom was a very permissive mom as well. I could read almost any Stephen King book by middle school, provided I wasn't too scared. The one book I wasn't allowed to read was Gerald's Game. So what did I do? Sat behind the couch (where the bookshelf was, where I usually read "adult" books) and read it. All of it. And boy, did I learn a few things.

I did a book report on The Tommyknockers in 8th grade. My teacher was horrified that I'd even been allowed to read it, but my mom defended me. And according to my 5th grade computerized testing, at that age I was reading beyond a 12th grade level. It wasn't so much beyond my ability to read as beyond my ability to not be afraid to go to sleep at night.

Outdoor Girl

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My parents were 'Let her read' parents, too.  I read so many books in a week that they couldn't censor what I read; they trusted me to put down any book I didn't like/didn't think I should be reading.  I was allowed to take out multiple books each week in the school library, because otherwise, I was asking to go in when it wasn't our class' turn.  I did a read-a-thon for MS one May.  Grade 3, I think it was.  I read a book a day that month.  I got through the first 31 books in the Hardy Boy series in the library.   ;D

My Dad was a 7th grade teacher.  He did a lesson on censorship and asked the class about their reading habits and was anyone reading so many books that their parents couldn't keep up.  Everyone turned and looked at this one poor girl.  So he asked her what she did when she got to a part of the book she didn't like/understand/think she should reading.  She said she either skipped ahead or quit reading the book.  The class apparently went on to have a really good discussion.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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jedikaiti

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This is a fun conversation.  Especially as a daughter of a librarian. 
My mom pretty much gave me full access to whatever I wanted to read.  Comics? Fine.  (especially since I had 3 other books that were chapter books) 
The only bit of trouble she had with me was when Judy Blume was extremely popular.  I was about 11/12 and I think my friends and I had read everything she had out.  Her new book had been out for a while and Mom said "Not at this time."  Of course, I just heard no.  So within about a month I was reading the new book, "Forever".  Mom caught me and sighed.  We talked a bit and she asked if I had any questions about the subject.  Later Mom told me that she really had hoped that I would have waited until I was in high school to read it.  Meh. 
Of course in junior high (about age13/14), I had a classmate try to get me into trouble with the teacher because I was reading one of Paul Zindel's books.

My parents also gave me free reign in the book world, but I preferred Pat Oliphant to Doonesbury. :-) I did scare a librarian when I asked for books about witches when I was in 3rd grade. She tried to steer me towards kids books about fictional witches, but I said no, I wanted books about real witches. She seemed a bit nervous, but showed me where to find them.

When I was in 7th grade, my band teacher caught me reading The Outsiders (SE Hinton) and asked if my parents knew I was reading that. I replied that it was my 3rd copy, as it had been a favorite book since 2nd grade.

As for Paul Zindel, I really loved The Pigman (I think I first read it around 4th or 5th grade). I was really annoyed in 7th grade, when we were assigned something lame to read, and the 8th graders got to read The Pigman. Then I got to 8th grade, again got something lame, and the 7th graders got something like The Outsiders. Grr!
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

z_squared82

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I work for a law firm. As I used to be a journalist, I’ve become the go to person for tracking people down.

I had an attorney ask me to call National Organization to see if they would give me the contact info for a person who had complained on the National Organization’s site about a business we were suing. Said National Organization’s privacy policy is right there, in easy-to-read language, on the site.

I told him, “Well, I can spend the time on it if you want me to, but I can tell you right now the answer is No.”

He wanted me to spend the time on it anyway.

National Organization’s answer was No.

NyaChan

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My mom was weird - I could read any and all of her books that I could find, including ones involving murder/rape/swear words, but I checked out a Nora Roberts once from the library and she confiscated it  ::)  I still don't get the logic, the best I could come up with was that she doesn't consider those books to have literary value to make the "stuff" worth reading. 

Goosey

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I love reading these stories, but can we step away from discussion of everyone's reading adventures?

Maybe there should be a spin off of who was reading what scandalous/complicated novel at what age. :)

Margo

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My parents were also 'let them read' parents - I remember being somewhat bemused when I found out that lots of my friends were not allowed to read 'Forever' and were shocked that I didn't feel the need to hide it when i read it.

My grandmother had a slight run-in with my mother's school, when my mum was about 13; the school (which was a boarding school) tried to say that my mum wasn't allowed to borrow books from the adult section of the town library. Unfortunately for them,  they were too mealy-mouthed to admit that they were worried about what she might read, and instead claimed it was because they didn't want to be responsible for any library fines she might incur. So my grandparents told them not to worry, they'd sign the forms and it would be them not the school who would be responsible...

We had so many books at home that I don't think it would have been very practical to try to censor our reading.

AliciaLynette

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My mom was weird - I could read any and all of her books that I could find, including ones involving murder/rape/swear words, but I checked out a Nora Roberts once from the library and she confiscated it  ::)  I still don't get the logic, the best I could come up with was that she doesn't consider those books to have literary value to make the "stuff" worth reading.

My mum was like this as well, not so much banning us from reading the books but not buying them for us/steering relatives away from them if they asked type thing.  Enid Blyton is the main one I remember, Mum didn't think she was a particularly good writer so didn't really want us reading them!

But then, I was the child reading Agatha Christie under the bedclothes at night aged 12.  Under the bedclothes so Mum wouldn't catch me, because they were on a high shelf I wasn't supposed to be able to reach.  Mum forgot I knew where the stepladder was!!
Children are natural mimics; they act like their parents in spite of every effort to teach them good manners.
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Firecat

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My mom was weird - I could read any and all of her books that I could find, including ones involving murder/rape/swear words, but I checked out a Nora Roberts once from the library and she confiscated it  ::)  I still don't get the logic, the best I could come up with was that she doesn't consider those books to have literary value to make the "stuff" worth reading.

My mum was like this as well, not so much banning us from reading the books but not buying them for us/steering relatives away from them if they asked type thing.  Enid Blyton is the main one I remember, Mum didn't think she was a particularly good writer so didn't really want us reading them!

But then, I was the child reading Agatha Christie under the bedclothes at night aged 12.  Under the bedclothes so Mum wouldn't catch me, because they were on a high shelf I wasn't supposed to be able to reach.  Mum forgot I knew where the stepladder was!!

This strikes me as funny because 12 was when Mom suggested I start reading her Agatha Christie collection.

MissRose

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Back to topic:

I had a customer email the support team to say if we did not switch him to a certain price plan right away, he would move to a new place.  We cannot offer the price and plan he wants here at all.

camlan

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At work, there's a huge project we are doing for a client. They send us files, we run the files through some software, and then we have to edit the files.

It's not complicated.

But, and it's a big but, the job is supposed to be finished at the end of September. We were supposed to get the first files from the client on May 15.

We got the first files on August 1.

There are issues with some of the editing. We have to question the client. They have to provide answers. Files can't be edited while we are waiting. The client is taking 2-3 weeks to answer a single question. (And the questions are related to problems in the client files, not things we caused--like do they want us to flag typos, fix typos or ignore all the typos.)

Now the client wants to move the end date of the project to September 15.

My bosses are trying to figure out how to explain that since the client was two and a half months late with the files (we still don't have them all), there's no way we can meet the original due date. Moving the due date up is simply not possible.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Winterlight

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I've asked my supervisor if we may start instituting a five minute rule for chatting and slightly delusional people. 

I'm sure this sounds silly and not that big a deal, but this has been going on for six months and daily it becomes more oppressive, especially since we have to deal with multiple versions of Bert embodied in other patrons.

We instituted one of those several years ago, because my colleagues were getting trapped on the phone with people who really, really don't want to know the truth. Which is that what they're calling about doesn't exist. 

If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

Jones

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I'm going to start out by saying, although I'm involved in entering work done into the computer, I don't have anything to do with invoicing really--all finalities come from Corporate. All invoices have a "please contact X phone number or Y email if you have questions about your bill".

So I received a series of emails stating that invoices A, B, C should have tax. I have no clue how this person got my email address, but I hunt down the invoices and send a heads up to the person who handles billing. She confirmed what I'd found. The invoices had tax.

I replied to the customer to confirm that what she'd received had tax. She replied they did, but they should NOT (word left off original emails) because labor "isn't taxable". Cue back and forth with the invoicer, our contractor tax guru, and my confirming via bookmarked tax sites that repair of physical objects in our state is, indeed, taxable.

Forwarded all to this customer with blessings from all the people who didn't want to handle this, cushioned in politeness, explaining that our type of labor is taxable and they will have to pay their taxes listed on the bill, unless they can provide an exemption certificate.

I wish I could make taxes go away. But I can not.
“A real desire to believe all the good you can of others and to make others as comfortable as you can will solve most of the problems.” CS Lewis