Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

Menus & Guests

(1/4) > >>

mbbored:
How much weight should be given when choosing a menu, to the moral opinions of the guest of honor or hosts vs the rest of the guests?

For one example, a grad student in my lab is Mormon.  Normally when somebody publishes a paper, passes a major exam, etc, we celebrate with cake and champagne.  Should we not have champagne present when it's in her honor, or can we just offer non-alcoholic sparkling cider and the rest of us enjoy champagne?

Another example is when BF and I plan on getting married.  We're both mainly vegetarian, but occasionally enjoy fresh, sustainably caught/environmentally friendly fish.  We plan on getting married, and debate if we can just offer vegetarian and fish dishes, or should we also offer meat to all of our guests.

In case you're curious, my opinion in the first case is for everybody to skip the champagne to respect her (and because nobody really needs alcohol to survive) and in the second, to offer a buffet instead of sit down dinner, so guests can choose to fill up on vegetarian friendly foods of their choices.

I'd love to hear what y'all think.

Evil Duckie:

--- Quote from: mbbored on April 11, 2007, 04:09:11 PM ---How much weight should be given when choosing a menu, to the moral opinions of the guest of honor or hosts vs the rest of the guests?

For one example, a grad student in my lab is Mormon.  Normally when somebody publishes a paper, passes a major exam, etc, we celebrate with cake and champagne.  Should we not have champagne present when it's in her honor, or can we just offer non-alcoholic sparkling cider and the rest of us enjoy champagne?
--- End quote ---

I would serve a non-alcoholic sparkling cider. This way you are not singling anyone out. People can celebrate without having to have alcoholic beverages.


--- Quote ---Another example is when BF and I plan on getting married.  We're both mainly vegetarian, but occasionally enjoy fresh, sustainably caught/environmentally friendly fish.  We plan on getting married, and debate if we can just offer vegetarian and fish dishes, or should we also offer meat to all of our guests.
--- End quote ---

I would offer vegetarian and fish dishes. You and DH are not obligated to serve meat just because some of your guest eat meat especially if you don't. People can enjoy a meal that doesn't include meat.

Sibby:

--- Quote from: mbbored on April 11, 2007, 04:09:11 PM ---For one example, a grad student in my lab is Mormon.  Normally when somebody publishes a paper, passes a major exam, etc, we celebrate with cake and champagne.  Should we not have champagne present when it's in her honor, or can we just offer non-alcoholic sparkling cider and the rest of us enjoy champagne?

--- End quote ---

I think either way is ok, but I would lean towards not having alcohol because this is to honor her, and to her alcohol is not appriciated for reasons deeper than she simply doesn't care for it.


--- Quote from: mbbored on April 11, 2007, 04:09:11 PM ---Another example is when BF and I plan on getting married.  We're both mainly vegetarian, but occasionally enjoy fresh, sustainably caught/environmentally friendly fish.  We plan on getting married, and debate if we can just offer vegetarian and fish dishes, or should we also offer meat to all of our guests.


--- End quote ---

I think a vegetarian reception is fine, and following suit to my above point - the wedding is supposed to honor you two.  In fact I've been to one fully vegetarian wedding: my brother's, he is a veggie, SIL is not, but they catered it themselves and it was simply easier to cook in advance, transport and serve (buffet style, with no waitstaff) vegetarian; there were about 40 guests in attendance.  And one vegetarian and seafood only wedding: my dads, my dad will eat meat or chicken, but tends not to; there were about 100 guests in attendance.  I was perfectly happy, and it appeared everyone in attendance were perfectly happy at both affairs.

Do make sure in either instance there are plenty of choices - while anyone can technically eat vegetarian, most people simply do not.  I have found in my expereince (I'm like my dad, I will eat poultry or meat, but I tend not to) most non-vegetarians are happiest with "ethinic" style vegetarian meals - think eggplant parm, pasta primavera, vegetable fried rice, vegetable lo mein, bean burritos, etc.  I'm not saying burritos are wedding appropriate (altho bite size bean empanadas would be a great passed hors duv ours (SP)) but just something to keep in mind.  Even with seafood, perhaps soemthing like paella, where if someone really doesn't like seafood, they can pick around it and eat the rice...

Lisbeth:
I lean toward following the honoree's dietary requirements.  That is, if they don't drink, I don't serve alcohol but provide some substitute that's acceptable to everyone.

If the honoree has a large number of requirements or really unusual ones, I'd make the occasion a buffet with some items aimed at the honoree's requirements, but let others bring what they feel is appropriate.

kiero:
1) It would be nice to get sparking juice.  It shows that you care about and honor her beliefs. 

2) No one needs to have meat with every supper.  go with the kind of meal you like and do it veggie.  As long as you serve the appropriate amounts of reasonable food - people shouldn't complain.  And they can always stop at McD's if they are too backwards to eat some vegetables. 

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version