Author Topic: Instant justice stories  (Read 38299 times)

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gramma dishes

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #240 on: Today at 12:57:36 PM »

...   Then Jerk went to boss with evidence that Dad and Aggie were embezzling money. Boss took one look at the paper work. Got the accountants and lawyers working on it and had Jerk arrested in short order. There were several errors he made in his attempted frame up. But the one that tipped boss off immediately. The signatures of Dad and Aggie were flawless except for 1 detail - they were in black ink. Dad NEVER signed anything in black ink - because a person could copy your signature (this was in the mid 80's) with a copier. That is exactly what Jerk had done. Aggie had followed Dad's lead and always used colored ink to (usually blue) to sign originals.

Please tell me the company pursued this in court and the guy at least served some jail time and got the negative publicity his behavior so richly deserved!

Luci

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #241 on: Today at 01:03:50 PM »
I'm a little skeptical about being sent home being a punishment for anyone.  >:D

If I had been sent home from school, I would have wished for 24/7 schooltime. :P.

Same here.  My parents attitude was that if I got in trouble at school, I could be assured that I'd be in even more trouble when I got home.

Sadly, things have changed.  No matter what their little darlings do, most parents today go ballistic on the schools for attempting to discipline their kids instead of their incredibly misbehaving offspring.

Yes! Grandma Dishes. We are cynical about school discipline, too. Things really changed between 1968 and 2002. (From 2 educators during that time.) I could write a few pages about that - but I guess a simple
                    :)  >:( Like  >:(  :)
will do for this thread.
« Last Edit: Today at 01:36:33 PM by Luci »

Sirius

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #242 on: Today at 01:14:17 PM »
I'm a little skeptical about being sent home being a punishment for anyone.  >:D

If I had been sent home from school, I would have wished for 24/7 schooltime. :P.

Same here.  My parents attitude was that if I got in trouble at school, I could be assured that I'd be in even more trouble when I got home.

Sadly, things have changed.  No matter what their little darlings do, most parents today go ballistic on the schools for attempting to discipline their kids instead of their incredibly misbehaving offspring.

That was me, too.  If I'd gotten in trouble at school I'd have been in big trouble when I got home.  The only time this didn't happen was when I was in first grade, and came home with bruises on my thighs from being spanked with a ruler.  My mother hit the ceiling.  Even though this was the mid 1960s and corporal punishment was a lot more widespread, this particular teacher hit me a lot more than really was needful.  I wasn't a bad student; she just didn't like me.  I got in (deserved) trouble for not handing in homework, so my parents would make me sit at the kitchen table and complete it, and then they'd check it over.  That type of thing is okay.  But to spank a 6-yo for accidentally writing on their desk or knocking the salt over in the lunch room?  That's too extreme, imo.  The whole thing stopped when my mother told the teacher that if she laid a hand on me again my mother was going to lay one on her, and my mother had a temper. 

Strangely enough, even after this early experience I still liked school.

Sirius

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #243 on: Today at 01:49:03 PM »
A long time ago, when my dad was still in the military, my mother was ironing one of his uniform shirts.  My dad made a comment about how long it was taking her, and she simply handed him the shirt and the iron and told him, "Go for it."  An hour later he was still ironing and cussing, but at least he never made that mistake again. 

I personally think my mother handled this perfectly. 

Jocelyn

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #244 on: Today at 03:29:44 PM »
A long time ago, when my dad was still in the military, my mother was ironing one of his uniform shirts.  My dad made a comment about how long it was taking her, and she simply handed him the shirt and the iron and told him, "Go for it."  An hour later he was still ironing and cussing, but at least he never made that mistake again. 

I personally think my mother handled this perfectly.
My father brought my mother some socks to darn. She looked at them and said, 'Darn, darn, darn,' and threw them in the trash.

She explained to him that when she was at home, she'd done everything to economize, since that was her contribution to the family budget...but now that she was working, she wasn't going to spend her leisure time eking a few more months wear out of $2 a pair socks.

Luci

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #245 on: Today at 04:29:45 PM »
My father brought my mother some socks to darn. She looked at them and said, 'Darn, darn, darn,' and threw them in the trash.

She explained to him that when she was at home, she'd done everything to economize, since that was her contribution to the family budget...but now that she was working, she wasn't going to spend her leisure time eking a few more months wear out of $2 a pair socks.

I know a couple who are in their 90s now who have been through a depression and WWII rationing. They will not keep leftover food. That is their one luxury. An open loaf of bread, bag of chips, etc., OK. But a bit of steak or veggies: no thank you.


jpcher

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #246 on: Today at 06:21:27 PM »
A long time ago, when my dad was still in the military, my mother was ironing one of his uniform shirts.  My dad made a comment about how long it was taking her, and she simply handed him the shirt and the iron and told him, "Go for it."  An hour later he was still ironing and cussing, but at least he never made that mistake again. 

I personally think my mother handled this perfectly.

I agree! ;D

When we first moved in together LDH complained about the way I washed his dress/work shirts. I washed them, threw them in the drier for about 10 minutes, shook out all the wrinkles and hung them up to dry.

LDH's problem? I did not button the shirts when I hung them.

After a to-do with LDH I told him that he's more than welcome to wash his own shirts in the manner that he'd like them to be done.

Instant Justice? I never had to do his laundry again. ;D

PastryGoddess

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #247 on: Today at 06:26:04 PM »
A long time ago, when my dad was still in the military, my mother was ironing one of his uniform shirts.  My dad made a comment about how long it was taking her, and she simply handed him the shirt and the iron and told him, "Go for it."  An hour later he was still ironing and cussing, but at least he never made that mistake again. 

I personally think my mother handled this perfectly.

I agree! ;D

When we first moved in together LDH complained about the way I washed his dress/work shirts. I washed them, threw them in the drier for about 10 minutes, shook out all the wrinkles and hung them up to dry.

LDH's problem? I did not button the shirts when I hung them.

After a to-do with LDH I told him that he's more than welcome to wash his own shirts in the manner that he'd like them to be done.

Instant Justice? I never had to do his laundry again. ;D


He sure showed you!