Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5110166 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14475 on: April 14, 2012, 08:13:26 AM »
From a friend attending a scifi/fandom convention:  Friend attended the convention because she specifically wanted to see a VERY popular author. VERY popular author was headlining the convention and attended a Q&A session with fans. My friend and her friend decided to go to the sessions in the Q&A room two hours ahead of the Q&A so they would be sure to get seats. (There are no rules against this.  They checked with the event staff.  The rooms were not cleared between sessions.  The seats were open and there were no tickets.)  Two other people also did this after getting permission from the staff.

... [editing for length]

Friend may have been slightly SS-ish for picking a seat early and sticking in it, and perhaps the staff should have handled it differently, but I think SS takes the prize for her rudeness and scene-causing.  At least Friend asked permission and was polite about it.

I don't think your friend was SS, given she was specifically told it was okay, but . . . this is why at "my" convention we always clear the more popular rooms in between panels.  If we didn't, people would show up first thing in the morning and monopolize the best seats for the mid-afternoon panel, sitting there all day through panels they don't care about and keeping fans of those other panels from getting to sit in front.  We also occasionally have panels that fill up completely, and we'd much rather have people out enjoying the convention than feel like they have to stand in line for eight hours to see one thing.

That said, we always get people who sneak in a panel or two ahead of the one they want to see and then throw a big tantrum when we make them leave the room and get in the back of the line for "their" panel  ::) Worse are the special needs folks (there are always one or two SS each year) who insist that because they use a wheelchair, we should pull out chairs and they should be able to sit in the front row!  Sorry, if you're the tenth person in the wheelchair line, you get the tenth reserved seat - which will probably be in the middle of the room, not all in front.  You only get special front row seating if your handicap requires it.  Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14476 on: April 14, 2012, 08:37:33 AM »
From a friend attending a scifi/fandom convention:  Friend attended the convention because she specifically wanted to see a VERY popular author. VERY popular author was headlining the convention and attended a Q&A session with fans. My friend and her friend decided to go to the sessions in the Q&A room two hours ahead of the Q&A so they would be sure to get seats. (There are no rules against this.  They checked with the event staff.  The rooms were not cleared between sessions.  The seats were open and there were no tickets.)  Two other people also did this after getting permission from the staff.

... [editing for length]

Friend may have been slightly SS-ish for picking a seat early and sticking in it, and perhaps the staff should have handled it differently, but I think SS takes the prize for her rudeness and scene-causing.  At least Friend asked permission and was polite about it.

I don't think your friend was SS, given she was specifically told it was okay, but . . . this is why at "my" convention we always clear the more popular rooms in between panels.  If we didn't, people would show up first thing in the morning and monopolize the best seats for the mid-afternoon panel, sitting there all day through panels they don't care about and keeping fans of those other panels from getting to sit in front.  We also occasionally have panels that fill up completely, and we'd much rather have people out enjoying the convention than feel like they have to stand in line for eight hours to see one thing.

That said, we always get people who sneak in a panel or two ahead of the one they want to see and then throw a big tantrum when we make them leave the room and get in the back of the line for "their" panel  ::) Worse are the special needs folks (there are always one or two SS each year) who insist that because they use a wheelchair, we should pull out chairs and they should be able to sit in the front row!  Sorry, if you're the tenth person in the wheelchair line, you get the tenth reserved seat - which will probably be in the middle of the room, not all in front.  You only get special front row seating if your handicap requires it.  Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

Agreed, it probably should have been handled differently.  I think the funny thing was that SSOF didn't see her behavior as rude or inconsiderate of the other fans, when she was saving eight front row seats for people who weren't there.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14477 on: April 14, 2012, 10:43:14 AM »
From a friend attending a scifi/fandom convention:  Friend attended the convention because she specifically wanted to see a VERY popular author. VERY popular author was headlining the convention and attended a Q&A session with fans. My friend and her friend decided to go to the sessions in the Q&A room two hours ahead of the Q&A so they would be sure to get seats. (There are no rules against this.  They checked with the event staff.  The rooms were not cleared between sessions.  The seats were open and there were no tickets.)  Two other people also did this after getting permission from the staff.

... [editing for length]

Friend may have been slightly SS-ish for picking a seat early and sticking in it, and perhaps the staff should have handled it differently, but I think SS takes the prize for her rudeness and scene-causing.  At least Friend asked permission and was polite about it.

I don't think your friend was SS, given she was specifically told it was okay, but . . . this is why at "my" convention we always clear the more popular rooms in between panels.  If we didn't, people would show up first thing in the morning and monopolize the best seats for the mid-afternoon panel, sitting there all day through panels they don't care about and keeping fans of those other panels from getting to sit in front.  We also occasionally have panels that fill up completely, and we'd much rather have people out enjoying the convention than feel like they have to stand in line for eight hours to see one thing.

That said, we always get people who sneak in a panel or two ahead of the one they want to see and then throw a big tantrum when we make them leave the room and get in the back of the line for "their" panel  ::) Worse are the special needs folks (there are always one or two SS each year) who insist that because they use a wheelchair, we should pull out chairs and they should be able to sit in the front row!  Sorry, if you're the tenth person in the wheelchair line, you get the tenth reserved seat - which will probably be in the middle of the room, not all in front.  You only get special front row seating if your handicap requires it.  Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

Agreed, it probably should have been handled differently.  I think the funny thing was that SSOF didn't see her behavior as rude or inconsiderate of the other fans, when she was saving eight front row seats for people who weren't there.

Yeah, that's definitely not cool.  We tell people "You can either sit where you are and let other people use these seats, or when your friends get here you can go back and sit with them."  Suddenly a lot of people don't care quite so much about sitting with their friends!

violinp

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14478 on: April 14, 2012, 11:47:13 AM »
My SS Next-Door Neighbour started building a fence today.

With power tools.

At 5am.

On a Saturday.

*cries*

(No point complaining to him/any one else. There's no laws against it in my area, and this guy is an SS to the extreme. Truly believes he's the centre of the universe.)

Lots of hugs!
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14479 on: April 14, 2012, 12:09:47 PM »
Would it be mean of me to hope (just a teeny bit) that he incurs a minor injury from working while it's still not quite daylight out yet?   :-\

Snooks

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14480 on: April 14, 2012, 03:25:19 PM »
<snip> Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

Just out of interest, how do you manage the length of the special needs line vs the regular line?  I always wonder how it's made "fair" if a person in the regular line has been queuing for an hour yet the special needs line is shorter and therefore they effectively queue jump.

Winterlight

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14481 on: April 14, 2012, 03:52:04 PM »
My SS Next-Door Neighbour started building a fence today.

With power tools.

At 5am.

On a Saturday.

*cries*

(No point complaining to him/any one else. There's no laws against it in my area, and this guy is an SS to the extreme. Truly believes he's the centre of the universe.)

May his power tools all simultaneously die. (((hugs)))
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Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14482 on: April 14, 2012, 03:56:16 PM »
<snip> Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

Just out of interest, how do you manage the length of the special needs line vs the regular line?  I always wonder how it's made "fair" if a person in the regular line has been queuing for an hour yet the special needs line is shorter and therefore they effectively queue jump.

I'm not that OP, but it sounded to me like there is specific seating for special needs.  So the special needs line is queueing up for 20 handicapped seats/wheelchair spots, and then open wheelchair room at the back, or something, and so they aren't trying to get the same spots as the regular line.

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14483 on: April 14, 2012, 04:12:23 PM »
<snip> Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

Just out of interest, how do you manage the length of the special needs line vs the regular line?  I always wonder how it's made "fair" if a person in the regular line has been queuing for an hour yet the special needs line is shorter and therefore they effectively queue jump.

Yeah, it's a bit like when the airline staff call people with special needs or small children to board the plane first.  You're not so much giving them a special privilege as accomodating the fact that it takes a little longer for them to board the plane and it would be more difficult to board in the "rush" of other passengers.

I'm not that OP, but it sounded to me like there is specific seating for special needs.  So the special needs line is queueing up for 20 handicapped seats/wheelchair spots, and then open wheelchair room at the back, or something, and so they aren't trying to get the same spots as the regular line.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14484 on: April 14, 2012, 06:40:03 PM »
<snip> Luckily, in the big panel rooms we have some fantastic volunteer staff who deal specifically with the special needs line (separate from the main queue) so we don't all have to be sidetracked by the SS tantrums while we're trying to load the other two thousand people into the room!

Just out of interest, how do you manage the length of the special needs line vs the regular line?  I always wonder how it's made "fair" if a person in the regular line has been queuing for an hour yet the special needs line is shorter and therefore they effectively queue jump.

I'm not that OP, but it sounded to me like there is specific seating for special needs.  So the special needs line is queueing up for 20 handicapped seats/wheelchair spots, and then open wheelchair room at the back, or something, and so they aren't trying to get the same spots as the regular line.

Yes, this.  There are spaces reserved for wheelchairs throughout the room (on the aisles), plus special spaces in the front row and right in front of the speakers and, if there is going to be an ASL interpreter, the closest seats in line of sight to him/her.  Right before we open up the room, we check the disability services line and find out how many people are there and what special seats they need, then (depending on the size of the panel) we can open up some of the non-wheelchair spots for everyone else.  The disability services folks go in first and get settled, but they only get the special seats that are already reserved for them - having a cane doesn't mean you get to sit front and center, just that you get an aisle somewhere (for example).  Then after everyone with mobility issues is settled, we open up the doors to the main line.

95% of people (able-bodied or not) are perfectly nice and pleasant and happy to be seeing their favorite famous people - it's just the other 5% who drive me nuts :P  And since we're working on such a tight turnaround schedule, all it takes are one or two special snowflakes who insist on my attention now now NOW to effectively mess up the flow of traffic for everyone else  :-\  Those of us who are veterans at room-loading can use this to our advantage: "Sorry, ma'am, I need to get everyone in their seats now.  I can talk to you after the line is loaded.  Oh, you'd rather be sitting and saving your seat than arguing with me?  Yes, I understand."

Danismom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14485 on: April 14, 2012, 07:38:21 PM »
Just out of curiosity, how do you handle the friends accompanying special needs individuals?  I'm sure some people with special needs require an assistant which should be accommodated.  However, I also think that people with special needs might want the seats next to them for their friends.  Do they get to save some seats for people who may be at the back of the able bodied line?  Do those friends join in the special needs line?  Is there a limit on how many friends can stay in the special needs line?  Just curious.  You can PM me if you'd like.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14486 on: April 14, 2012, 08:11:25 PM »
Just out of curiosity, how do you handle the friends accompanying special needs individuals?  I'm sure some people with special needs require an assistant which should be accommodated.  However, I also think that people with special needs might want the seats next to them for their friends.  Do they get to save some seats for people who may be at the back of the able bodied line?  Do those friends join in the special needs line?  Is there a limit on how many friends can stay in the special needs line?  Just curious.  You can PM me if you'd like.

Many of the seats have companion seats reserved also - each person gets one companion seat.  I'm not sure what happens if they're with a larger group - most of the time the room doesn't fill all the way, so it's usually possible to get a whole group of seats closer to the back (including a wheelchair spot and/or an aisle seat if necessary).

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14487 on: April 14, 2012, 08:48:10 PM »
DH and I encountered not one, but two, versions of SS "I'm so important I don't have to wait in line" today while running errands.

First SS was found at the stoplight leading out of our neighborhood.  The street doesn't have any lines painted on it, so there's never a nice, tidy line - you can have cars shifted one way or the other - but there's still clearly a line.  So we were pretty stunned when a car drove up past three cars to park itself to the left of, and in front of, our car.  It was so far off to the left, that several cars turning into the street nearly hit it.  DH doesn't believe in using his horn  ::), and neither of us could figure out another way of telling these people they were doing something messed up.  If the light had lasted longer, I was considering getting out of the car, walking up to that other car and saying "You do realize the line of cars started back there, right?"

Second SS was at a stop sign at the exit to a strip mall.  DH was at the sign, waiting to turn right, with about three people behind him.  A guy in a minivan roars up next to him, doesn't even slow down for the stop sign, and just careens out into traffic.  He nearly got hit by oncoming traffic, which was the reason DH hadn't made his turn yet! 

I amused myself for the rest of the drive home imagining what would happen the day either of those people repeated their behavior in front of a cop, or someone who doesn't have anger management skills.  Or, for that matter, when they make a slight miscalculation and get T-boned by someone. 

iridaceae

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14488 on: April 15, 2012, 01:42:11 AM »
I was at PetSmart the other day and witnessed a woman busy explaining to the check-out cashier that as she was from a state that does not have a state sales tax [for non-USAns, not all states have state taxes on items, and when states do what is taxed and the amount can vary greatly] she should be exempt from paying sales tax.

Here in Washington (sales tax state), residents of Oregon (no sales tax) shopping in WA can show their ID in stores and have the sales tax waived. Not sure if other states do that...

I doubt Arizona does it, but even if we did you would think you'd be pulling out your ID or whatever. Nope, she was simply telling them tht since she was a resident of whatever state she should get it.

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #14489 on: April 15, 2012, 01:35:31 PM »
I was at PetSmart the other day and witnessed a woman busy explaining to the check-out cashier that as she was from a state that does not have a state sales tax [for non-USAns, not all states have state taxes on items, and when states do what is taxed and the amount can vary greatly] she should be exempt from paying sales tax.

Here in Washington (sales tax state), residents of Oregon (no sales tax) shopping in WA can show their ID in stores and have the sales tax waived. Not sure if other states do that...

I doubt Arizona does it, but even if we did you would think you'd be pulling out your ID or whatever. Nope, she was simply telling them tht since she was a resident of whatever state she should get it.

Well then... yeah, that's a Special Snowflake...