Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5538414 times)

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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17565 on: October 19, 2012, 02:32:58 AM »
I've almost been in the same position - I had the keys to my then-boyfriend's flat, but was unable to physically work the lock on the building and had to convince someone to let me in.  Very embarrassing  :-[

KenveeB

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17566 on: October 19, 2012, 08:17:30 AM »
I would stop for an emergency, this wasn't one.
This situation seems to fit the age-old advice, "Lack of planning on your part does not make an emergency on my part." 8)

Reminds me of that awkward Seinfield episode where he refuses to let a guy into the building with him because of security issues and building policy, and it turns out the guy is in fact legit and has recently moved in, and really had just forgotten his keys as he claimed.   It was sucky because Jerry was completely in the right in what he did, but he made an enemy of his new neighbour and looked like a jerk!  Rules are rules though.  If they need emergency access that's what a super or building manager is for.

I thought he looked like a jerk in that one because it wasn't a NEW neighbor, it was someone who'd lived on his floor and he SHOULD have recognized. Been a while since I saw it, though.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17567 on: October 19, 2012, 10:17:11 AM »
Here's a doozie from MIL!  Basic background: my ILs own several rental properties, not horrible but certainly on the cheaper end of what you can get locally.  Most have reliable, long-term renters, but there are always several at any given time rented by people who won't pay, are in the process of getting evicted, etc.  I think they need to sell their cheapest houses and buy a few nicer ones and they wouldn't have that problem so much, but whatever  ::)

First half of the doozie:

Tenant Lady (TL) stopped paying three months ago.  Eviction takes a long time - you get a month or so of grace period (if you have a good sob story), then it takes two months to work through the courts once your landlord pays the fee to start the paperwork.  People who make a habit of being deadbeats know this, so they frequently just pay the deposit and first month's rent, then stop paying until they're evicted, at which point they've saved up the money for deposit and one month's rent on a new place.  Many know to the day how long they're able to stay for free as long as they show up in court on the right days and make the right complaints.  TL was one of those - she dragged the process out as long as possible, until finally the judge ordered her out.  Right before she would have been evicted, she made an agreement to pay part of what she owed and to pay extra each month for the next several months to cover the rest.

Apparently she thought this meant she got another three months free, because she didn't pay any more after that initial payment.  She was shocked - shocked! - to find out that the paperwork she signed for the agreement means if she stops paying, the eviction proceedings go right back to where they were, i.e. just a few days before MIL can call the sheriff to remover TL's belongings from the house.  It's so unfair, MIL should have warned her, etc.  Lady, if you want to rent a house, you have to pay rent!  What's so hard to understand?

Second half of the doozie:

TL has a boyfriend (BF).  BF has been living with her - in violation of her lease, which requires her to tell her landlords if anyone else moves in - and also living there for free.  TL and BF have a fight, in which TL kicks BF out.  BF calls my MIL wanting his money back.  Yes, he was the one who put up the money to keep them from being evicted (the part that TL paid upfront).  He gave TL cash, however, and since it was her name on the money order, MIL legally has to assume the money belonged to TL.  MIL told him he could take TL to small claims court to get his money back if he wanted, but it wasn't her problem.

BF then decided he'd get back at TL and my in-laws by burning the house down.  He broke back in and doused the sofa, recliner, and living room carpet in kerosene and lit it.  TL's teenage son was home at the time and managed to get the fire out, burning his hand in the process.  MIL finds out about this when she arrives in the morning with the sheriff to formally evict TL, only to find a charred couch and recliner already out by the street.  The neighbors told her what happened and that TL hadn't been back home since the fire but her son had gotten a ride to the emergency room.

So to top off a long story, MIL ended up calling TL and had to break to her that a) her son was in the ER, b) her boyfriend had tried to burn down her house, and c) her stuff was being put out on the street at the same time.  TL was most angry about her stuff.

(I can't fathom why MIL and FIL do this voluntarily!  Now MIL has to deal with fire inspectors, renovate the charred living room, and repair the smoke damage to the rest of the house, all before she can get any more rent for this place.)

Elphaba

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17568 on: October 19, 2012, 10:38:55 AM »
I know it was a few pages back, but I have to say how happy I am that there are other people who have problems with the layouts at Panera! The one closest to me is so strangely and poorly laid out that I avoid going at busy times otherwise I get so anxious/stressed about where I'm supposed to stand, if I'm in someone's way, that someone's clearly in MY way (but they probably don't realize it due to the poor layout) that I can't handle it!

In "my" Panera, it's impossible to walk through the store to/from the restoom, to/from the trash cans or to/from the line for the registers without walking directly through the area where you get sodas or cream and sugar for coffee which is only wide enough for a person to stand there getting their drink so no one can pass. Added to the cross traffic is the pre-reported problems with their being no real line for the registers so everyone gets all confused.

I think I'm going to have to start calling it "Storm Conditions" because it's the perfect atmosphere to create (even unintentional) Special Snowflakes who just have no idea what's going on!

Elphaba

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17569 on: October 19, 2012, 10:41:59 AM »
I wouldn't have any problem going to a strictly secular event that happened to be held in a house of worship.  We've gone to several in Unitarian churches and synagogues.   

After all, RPI installed one of their course labs in a deconsecrated church.  If you think about it, the reuse of the space was oddly appropriate.

There are people whose religion forbids this though, I wonder what they are expected to do.

Why would any religion forbid someone from entering a deconsecrated  church.  It's no longer a house of worship and is no longer dedicated to religious purposes at this point it is no different than going to another classroom building on campus or another theater. This is common practice in some cities these days.  And if your religion forbids it still you should have done your research better and figured that out before hand.  The rest of the community does not havve your restrictions and should not have to work around them for you. If this is the building that is now used this is the  building used.
  If the and if they object to merely sitting in a building to get information they can make arrangements to get the info in another way. Have a friend or administrator record it or something.

I have to agree. Just the other day my BFF and I were strolling downtown together. She pointed out a very old looking church and said that recently, another friend of ours had been to a party there. Apparently it was no longer a church and had been converted into a private residence. The owner had kept a few of the "church-y" features (stained glass with religious themes, etc) but it was mostly a house now. As a hostess in that situation I would try to be very understanding of a guest who had to decline an invitation because my house was "a church" I might be a little put out and confused.

deadbody

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17570 on: October 19, 2012, 01:31:42 PM »
I wouldn't have any problem going to a strictly secular event that happened to be held in a house of worship.  We've gone to several in Unitarian churches and synagogues.   

After all, RPI installed one of their course labs in a deconsecrated church.  If you think about it, the reuse of the space was oddly appropriate.

There are people whose religion forbids this though, I wonder what they are expected to do.

Why would any religion forbid someone from entering a deconsecrated  church.  It's no longer a house of worship and is no longer dedicated to religious purposes at this point it is no different than going to another classroom building on campus or another theater. This is common practice in some cities these days.  And if your religion forbids it still you should have done your research better and figured that out before hand.  The rest of the community does not havve your restrictions and should not have to work around them for you. If this is the building that is now used this is the  building used.
  If the and if they object to merely sitting in a building to get information they can make arrangements to get the info in another way. Have a friend or administrator record it or something.

I have to agree. Just the other day my BFF and I were strolling downtown together. She pointed out a very old looking church and said that recently, another friend of ours had been to a party there. Apparently it was no longer a church and had been converted into a private residence. The owner had kept a few of the "church-y" features (stained glass with religious themes, etc) but it was mostly a house now. As a hostess in that situation I would try to be very understanding of a guest who had to decline an invitation because my house was "a church" I might be a little put out and confused.

I believe there is a difference between deconsecrated places and still active houses of worship.

I know this is an issue for Jehovah's Witnesses as a carpet installer who worked for my company would not install carpet at a catholic church, even not in the sanctuary because it violated his religion to enter the church.  Ditto a friend who was a JW and married a woman who was not, they couldn't get married in her church because his family would not have attended.

mbbored

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17571 on: October 19, 2012, 11:58:48 PM »
I live in a townhouse with my dog who has been really stressed lately, showing some extreme reactions to people walking by my house or ringing my doorbell. I've ended up hiring a behaviorist to deal with this, spending almost $400 so far.

Further background, there's a 2 bedroom unit in my building with 8 people living there, which is against housing codes. I figure the economy is terrible and they're mostly nice, except for one woman who has a baby and a preschooler. She thought it was really cute to hold the baby up to MY doorbell and let him ring it nonstop. I spoke to her about it twice and both time she seemed really surprised that it bothered me. "But he's having so much fun!" So let him do it to your house. "But the preschooler is napping!" So was I! Not my problem! The second time she finally said "You really mean the baby can't ring your bell?!?" Yes! Fortunately, it hasn't happened again, or so I thought.

Today I decided to work from home. This afternoon, my doorbell starts ringing nonstop. My dog is freaking out, and I whip open the front door to find the same woman with her baby.

Bad neighbor: Oh, you're home!
Me: What are you doing? I've told you repeatedly to leave my doorbell alone. You are driving my dog crazy!
BN: Oh, I don't mind the barking!
Me: I mind the $400 I've spent trying to deal with the anxiety problem you've apparently created in my dog.
BN: But the baby loves it!
Me: I don't care.

Right now I'm so furious at her that I'm somewhat tempted to call her landlord and let him know about his extra tenants, but I don't want to do something out of revenge.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2012, 12:05:33 AM by mbbored »

snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17572 on: October 20, 2012, 12:13:03 AM »
I live in a townhouse with my dog who has been really stressed lately, showing some extreme reactions to people walking by my house or ringing my doorbell. I've ended up hiring a behaviorist to deal with this, spending almost $400 so far.

Further background, there's a 2 bedroom unit in my building with 8 people living there, which is against housing codes. I figure the economy is terrible and they're mostly nice, except for one woman who has a baby and a preschooler. She thought it was really cute to hold the baby up to MY doorbell and let him ring it nonstop. I spoke to her about it twice and both time she seemed really surprised that it bothered me. "But he's having so much fun!" So let him do it to your house. "But the preschooler is napping!" So was I! Not my problem! The second time she finally said "You really mean the baby can't ring your bell?!?" Yes! Fortunately, it hasn't happened again, or so I thought.

Today I decided to work from home. This afternoon, my doorbell starts ringing nonstop. My dog is freaking out, and I whip open the front door to find the same woman with her baby.

Bad neighbor: Oh, you're home!
Me: What are you doing? I've told you repeatedly to leave my doorbell alone. You are driving my dog crazy!
BN: Oh, I don't mind the barking!
Me: I mind the $400 I've spent trying to deal with the anxiety problem you've apparently created in my dog.
BN: But the baby loves it!
Me: I don't care.

Right now I'm so furious at her that I'm somewhat tempted to call her landlord and let him know about his extra tenants, but I don't want to do something out of revenge.

you just explained why your dog hates the doorbell lately.
She's abusing your dog. do anything and everything to protect your dog from her and her nastiness.

blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17573 on: October 20, 2012, 03:08:30 AM »
I live in a townhouse with my dog who has been really stressed lately, showing some extreme reactions to people walking by my house or ringing my doorbell. I've ended up hiring a behaviorist to deal with this, spending almost $400 so far.

Further background, there's a 2 bedroom unit in my building with 8 people living there, which is against housing codes. I figure the economy is terrible and they're mostly nice, except for one woman who has a baby and a preschooler. She thought it was really cute to hold the baby up to MY doorbell and let him ring it nonstop. I spoke to her about it twice and both time she seemed really surprised that it bothered me. "But he's having so much fun!" So let him do it to your house. "But the preschooler is napping!" So was I! Not my problem! The second time she finally said "You really mean the baby can't ring your bell?!?" Yes! Fortunately, it hasn't happened again, or so I thought.

Today I decided to work from home. This afternoon, my doorbell starts ringing nonstop. My dog is freaking out, and I whip open the front door to find the same woman with her baby.

Bad neighbor: Oh, you're home!
Me: What are you doing? I've told you repeatedly to leave my doorbell alone. You are driving my dog crazy!
BN: Oh, I don't mind the barking!
Me: I mind the $400 I've spent trying to deal with the anxiety problem you've apparently created in my dog.
BN: But the baby loves it!
Me: I don't care.

Right now I'm so furious at her that I'm somewhat tempted to call her landlord and let him know about his extra tenants, but I don't want to do something out of revenge.

you just explained why your dog hates the doorbell lately.
She's abusing your dog. do anything and everything to protect your dog from her and her nastiness.

I would agree.

Your poor dog has likely been through this scenario a lot lately. I'd be more than a little freaked out as well if someone was randomly ringing my doorbell.
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

Carotte

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17574 on: October 20, 2012, 05:28:11 AM »
You could always "threaten" her, even if you never act on your words. An icy cold " ( If this keep up I'm going to have to notify your landlord and ) for someone who is already violating housing codes you might want to keep a low profile".
You can expect to not have any kind of good relationship with those people after that but at least your dog will be better and they will still live there.
It might not be polite, or you could even sugar coat it as a 'friendly advise' but at least it should be effective and there's no need to involve landlord or police.

Redsoil

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17575 on: October 20, 2012, 05:31:04 AM »
Disconnect the doorbell for a while?
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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17576 on: October 20, 2012, 08:14:31 AM »
Disconnect the doorbell for a while?
If possible I would do this until you take care of the problem another way. That way she can't torment your dog anymore. 
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geekette

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17577 on: October 20, 2012, 08:30:26 AM »
Disconnect the doorbell for a while?

Better than my automatic solution. Evil Geekette wanted to set up the doorbell so a minor electrical current went through it every time it was pushed.

BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17578 on: October 20, 2012, 08:32:25 AM »
H-e-double toothpicks, I wouldn't waste time on warning this idiot.  She is tormenting your dog and being a nuisance.  Rat her out to the landlord ASAP and give your poor dog some peace.

Lady Snowdon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17579 on: October 20, 2012, 09:33:42 AM »
I live in a townhouse with my dog who has been really stressed lately, showing some extreme reactions to people walking by my house or ringing my doorbell. I've ended up hiring a behaviorist to deal with this, spending almost $400 so far.

Further background, there's a 2 bedroom unit in my building with 8 people living there, which is against housing codes. I figure the economy is terrible and they're mostly nice, except for one woman who has a baby and a preschooler. She thought it was really cute to hold the baby up to MY doorbell and let him ring it nonstop. I spoke to her about it twice and both time she seemed really surprised that it bothered me. "But he's having so much fun!" So let him do it to your house. "But the preschooler is napping!" So was I! Not my problem! The second time she finally said "You really mean the baby can't ring your bell?!?" Yes! Fortunately, it hasn't happened again, or so I thought.

Today I decided to work from home. This afternoon, my doorbell starts ringing nonstop. My dog is freaking out, and I whip open the front door to find the same woman with her baby.

Bad neighbor: Oh, you're home!
Me: What are you doing? I've told you repeatedly to leave my doorbell alone. You are driving my dog crazy!
BN: Oh, I don't mind the barking!
Me: I mind the $400 I've spent trying to deal with the anxiety problem you've apparently created in my dog.
BN: But the baby loves it!
Me: I don't care.

Right now I'm so furious at her that I'm somewhat tempted to call her landlord and let him know about his extra tenants, but I don't want to do something out of revenge.

Rat her out to the landlord ASAP, and disconnect your doorbell until they've been evicted.  I'm not quite sure why this lady doesn't get that she get use your property for her child's amusement, but she obviously doesn't.  Don't be concerned about hurting her feelings or anything - she's terrorizing your dog and trespassing on your property to do it.