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Special Snowflake Stories

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MissRose:
In my part of Michigan, we are dealing with a lot of flooding special thanks to the melting snow but more to the hard downpours of rain.  Some roads and intersections have signs up "Road Closed".    In some areas if people try to get through, the police have been ticketing people who drive through the areas and I am sure those people don't live in the area.   Plus some people think they can drive through a foot of water or so then get stuck, which makes it hard for rescues and towing especially in areas with widespread flooding that is slowly receding.

artk2002:

--- Quote from: NyaChan on April 21, 2013, 07:52:37 PM ---
--- Quote from: kherbert05 on April 21, 2013, 07:48:34 PM ---
--- Quote from: weeblewobble on April 21, 2013, 05:53:26 PM ---
After church, I mentioned to DH that it would have been better if one of our ushers approached the family and asked them to take the baby to the quiet room.  DH said that would be unkind and could turn that whole family away from attending the church.  I said OK, but what about Emily and her family, who we've all known for years?  Shouldn't we be concerned about their feelings, too?  I called the baby's family special snowflakes.  DH said they weren't, and maybe the mother was just nervous about leaving the baby in the baby nursery.  I said that would be fine, she could still go to the quiet room out of consideration to the rest of the congregation - even if there wasn't important ceremony going on.  It's polite to take a baby out of a quiet setting when he or she is crying.  He says that's not very welcoming.

So what say you?

--- End quote ---
They should have moved the child to the quiet room. When they didn't either the ushers or the minister should have told them to take the child out. I hope at the very least the minister or someone from the church makes it clear in the future crying babies should be removed.

--- End quote ---

I agree with this.  If they are asked politely and kindly to have someone take the child outside until the child has calmed down, there is no reason why they should have their feelings hurt or feel unwelcome.

--- End quote ---

And if they did get their feelings hurt or feel unwelcome, then they may not be the right fit for this particular church community. Asking someone to take a disruptive child away from a solemn ceremony is not, in any way, shape or form, out of line. If a simple request to respect the rest of the community puts their knickers in a twist, what else will they do?

artk2002:

--- Quote from: RebeccainGA on April 22, 2013, 07:25:39 AM ---DP and I have an ongoing debate of sorts going on this point - I say, it's better to avoid the accident than be right. She's more of a 'it's my right of way, no you can't share it, you'll get the ticket not me' on these things.


--- End quote ---

One of my favorite "funny" epitaphs:

--- Quote ---This is the grave of Mike ODay
Who died maintaining his right of way.
His right was clear, his will was strong,
But hes just as dead as if hed been wrong.

--- End quote ---

Ceallach:

--- Quote from: artk2002 on April 22, 2013, 09:10:22 AM ---
--- Quote from: RebeccainGA on April 22, 2013, 07:25:39 AM ---DP and I have an ongoing debate of sorts going on this point - I say, it's better to avoid the accident than be right. She's more of a 'it's my right of way, no you can't share it, you'll get the ticket not me' on these things.


--- End quote ---

One of my favorite "funny" epitaphs:

--- Quote ---This is the grave of Mike ODay
Who died maintaining his right of way.
His right was clear, his will was strong,
But hes just as dead as if hed been wrong.

--- End quote ---

--- End quote ---

I love that :-)

One of my favorite lines that I use in the context of relationships and also at work is "would you rather be right or happy?"  'cos picking your battles is wise.

MissRose:

--- Quote from: artk2002 on April 22, 2013, 09:07:38 AM ---
--- Quote from: NyaChan on April 21, 2013, 07:52:37 PM ---
--- Quote from: kherbert05 on April 21, 2013, 07:48:34 PM ---
--- Quote from: weeblewobble on April 21, 2013, 05:53:26 PM ---
After church, I mentioned to DH that it would have been better if one of our ushers approached the family and asked them to take the baby to the quiet room.  DH said that would be unkind and could turn that whole family away from attending the church.  I said OK, but what about Emily and her family, who we've all known for years?  Shouldn't we be concerned about their feelings, too?  I called the baby's family special snowflakes.  DH said they weren't, and maybe the mother was just nervous about leaving the baby in the baby nursery.  I said that would be fine, she could still go to the quiet room out of consideration to the rest of the congregation - even if there wasn't important ceremony going on.  It's polite to take a baby out of a quiet setting when he or she is crying.  He says that's not very welcoming.

So what say you?

--- End quote ---
They should have moved the child to the quiet room. When they didn't either the ushers or the minister should have told them to take the child out. I hope at the very least the minister or someone from the church makes it clear in the future crying babies should be removed.

--- End quote ---

I agree with this.  If they are asked politely and kindly to have someone take the child outside until the child has calmed down, there is no reason why they should have their feelings hurt or feel unwelcome.

--- End quote ---

And if they did get their feelings hurt or feel unwelcome, then they may not be the right fit for this particular church community. Asking someone to take a disruptive child away from a solemn ceremony is not, in any way, shape or form, out of line. If a simple request to respect the rest of the community puts their knickers in a twist, what else will they do?

--- End quote ---

I do not mind children at Mass (as I am Catholic).  But at the same time if they cannot be calmed down, their caregiver (parent, grandparent etc) needs to take them out and attend to their needs to save the ears of the celebrant(s) & congregation.  If they need to constantly take a child out, then they should sit in the back or a designated area that has some soundproofing.

My mother sat in the back when me and my sister were little as my sister was more challenging compared to me to get her to stay in one spot quietly then later on was able to move closer to front of the church. I feel she was being polite in what she did until my sister would not dart off into the next county and make a commotion at the same time.

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