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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6559336 times)

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Margo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20625 on: April 24, 2013, 09:40:19 AM »
I don't think it is unreasonable to ask that parents clear up spills, to eat and drink away from the play equipment (allergies aside, having your child sit in, or put their hand in, someone else's split juice or melted ice-cream is not very nice), and expecting that parents take their litter home, or find a bin,  rather than leaving it scattered around the place seems to me entirely reasonable.

It maybe starts to get a little bit SS when it comes to telling other parents to use wipes not antibacterial gel, but even then the tone is more "It would really help if you did this" not "You must do this", so I'm willing to give her a pass :-)

delabela

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20626 on: April 24, 2013, 09:41:26 AM »
I was ready to believe the author was being snowflakey, but the article was actually informative and reasonable.  For instance, I did not know that hand sanitizer won't get the allergens off a kid's hands. 

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20627 on: April 24, 2013, 09:41:59 AM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.

Hmm.  I'm not sure I'd go that far.  I mean, it should be on her to keep an eye on her children and make sure they aren't, what, trying to eat other kids' discarded snacks off the ground?  I think that any parent who has a kid young enough to eat crushed goldfish off the ground should be keeping a pretty close eye on their child until he/she grows out of that stage.  I was worried at first that her complaint was going to be kids eating a snack, not washing their hands, then climbing on equipment and getting peanut or whatever on it, because I just don't think that's something that can be managed.  But I do think that an appeal to parents to not leave their child's mess all over the playground (snacks or otherwise) is reasonable.  I can see not picking up crushed goldfish cracker crumbs.  They're biodegradable.

But I do wonder what parks she's taking her kids to.  I've rarely seen any food left out at any park I've ever taken my kids to, and we go all the time.  Yeah, sometimes somebody leaves a bag from fast food or a cup on the nearest picnic table, and sometimes there's a wrapper being blown around in the grass nearby, and some other empty trash like that, but it's *very* rare that I've seen actual food left behind.  And the places that I tend to see the most trash and junk are the playgrounds that also have pavilions and skate parks nearby... those things are like a trash heap.  Regular playgrounds that are by themselves?  I just don't see all that many people bring snacks.  Maybe it's a regional thing, I don't know.  We never bring snacks to the park ourselves, although we've occasionally brought lunch and ate at a picnic table, but that's rare and usually only if we're meeting somebody at the park and plan to be there longer.  And we throw our trash away.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20628 on: April 24, 2013, 09:46:26 AM »
MommyPenguin wrote:

"Every single week this SUV parks in the same spot... right *next* to the parking spots, but not in one.  Basically, she likes to make her own parking space that is the closest to the building.  At first glance it *looks* as though she's in a parking space because she's lined up with them, but she's not, she's parked in the roadway."

Given that first glance error, it's possible that the driver doesn't realize that the spot isn't a real space, so I'd give a pass until someone in authority can inform her.  If she continues after that I'll definitely agree.

Virg

Well, I could see that, except that when I meant first glance error, I meant as somebody is pulling into the parking lot from the entrance.  From there, it looks like the line of cars just goes on a bit farther than you'd expect.  However, if you actually walk by her car, you realize that while all the other cars are parked pointing in towards a grassy patch, she's on the other side of the last car, so that all is at the head of her car is road, you realize she's not at all in a spot.  Once she's parked, from a distance and from the entrance to the lot, it does look like she's parked in a legit space.  But if you were actually pulling into the area where she's parking, it's very obvious that it's not.  Also, the spaces are clearly marked.  She's in the roadway and blocks off a car's width of it, so that cars who are taking the little roadway around to the back of the lot have to go around her.
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Virg

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20629 on: April 24, 2013, 09:52:35 AM »
stitchygreyanonymouse wrote:

"The particular SS parks on the wrong side of the street (itís a narrow residential one, so you canít park on both sides), in the bend of the road, right in front of a fire hydrant and a no parking sign. Every day."

If this person is actually parking (as in leaving the vehicle) a call to the police will fix the issue fast.  If they're not leaving the vehicle they may not be breaking any laws (call your local police to find out) and if they aren't breaking any laws or interfering with traffic flow then I can't call them SS.

Elfmama wrote:

"If I want to bring them cheese sticks, it's HER job to remind her DD that she can't have one, even if I offer to share. It's not my job to think "Oh, we can't take these oatmeal-raisin cookies to the playground.  Some other child there might be allergic to gluten or raisins or eggs.""

The gist of the article is that you shouldn't leave that sort of snack laying around or throw it on the ground, not that you shouldn't bring it at all.  I think it's reasonable to ask you not to throw your cookies around like Frisbees or let the kids eat them while they're crawling around in the plastic tubes (not that I expect an e-Hellion to do that sort of thing, but the article wasn't just for us).

Virg

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20630 on: April 24, 2013, 09:58:49 AM »
Since it's possible that people can be allergic to dingdangity near anything, trying to find a hypo-allergenic snack for your kids to take to the playground is nearly impossible. I'm sorry that the child has such severe allergies, but it's the MOTHER'S job to handle it, not mine.

I agree when it comes to her child actually *eating* someone else's kid's foods, but I see her point re: contact allergies.  There's a much shorter list of foods which have a reasonable chance to kill someone if they touch it: peanuts and shellfish, mostly.  Anyone who has young children is familiar with "peanut-free" zones nowadays, because they're so common - I'd say about half of schools I'm familiar with are nut-free, and the rest have at least one nut-free classroom.  Because of that, I try not to bring peanut butter products when we're going to be in a public place (playgrounds, airports, etc.) - it's not really extra work for me, but I see it like not playing loud music through headphones when other people are close enough to be bothered.  (And I say this as a parent of a child who LOVES her peanut butter!)

So in short: it's a parent's responsibility to make sure their child doesn't take food from strangers if they're allergic, but I do think it's common courtesy to not leave peanut butter or shrimp dip smeared around the playground  :P

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20631 on: April 24, 2013, 10:07:21 AM »

But I do wonder what parks she's taking her kids to.  I've rarely seen any food left out at any park I've ever taken my kids to, and we go all the time.  Yeah, sometimes somebody leaves a bag from fast food or a cup on the nearest picnic table, and sometimes there's a wrapper being blown around in the grass nearby, and some other empty trash like that, but it's *very* rare that I've seen actual food left behind.  And the places that I tend to see the most trash and junk are the playgrounds that also have pavilions and skate parks nearby... those things are like a trash heap.  Regular playgrounds that are by themselves?  I just don't see all that many people bring snacks.  Maybe it's a regional thing, I don't know.  We never bring snacks to the park ourselves, although we've occasionally brought lunch and ate at a picnic table, but that's rare and usually only if we're meeting somebody at the park and plan to be there longer.  And we throw our trash away.

The playgrounds in NYC have definitely seen its share of crushed snacks and dropped trash.  Maybe because in some cases the playgrounds aren't that close to the families' apartment, so parents tend to bring snacks if they're going to be at the playground for awhile.  I've definitely seen more trash at the nicer playgrounds in Central Park than at a local one. 

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20632 on: April 24, 2013, 10:11:14 AM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.

Hmm.  I'm not sure I'd go that far.  I mean, it should be on her to keep an eye on her children and make sure they aren't, what, trying to eat other kids' discarded snacks off the ground?  I think that any parent who has a kid young enough to eat crushed goldfish off the ground should be keeping a pretty close eye on their child until he/she grows out of that stage.

Except it isn't about the child eating the snacks - it is about her accidentally touching some of the allergen that has been spilled on the play equipment.  For someone allergic enough, just grabbing a handle that has a bit of peanut stuck to it can cause anaphylaxis.  I knew of a little boy who ended up hospitalised with anaphylaxis after wearing a riding helmet at a "50p pony ride" thing because the child who had used the helmet before had been eating peanuts.

Dr. F.

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20633 on: April 24, 2013, 10:12:54 AM »
I'm nominating the person(s) who broke off about half of the tulips in the large tubs along the sidewalk yesterday morning. Grrr!

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20634 on: April 24, 2013, 10:16:43 AM »
Dr. F, it may not have been a person.  I was cursing the person who was breaking my lilies off last summer.  At which point, my neighbours informed me that the squirrels were climbing up the tree and taking a flying leap at the lilies to break the blooms off.

If it was a person, they deserve special snowflake status.  Can we bestow it upon squirrels?   :)
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Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20635 on: April 24, 2013, 10:21:03 AM »
I'm nominating the person(s) who broke off about half of the tulips in the large tubs along the sidewalk yesterday morning. Grrr!

Years ago, we had that sort of thing happen around here.  People would plant flowers around their homes and wake up one morning to find that the plants had been stolen during the night.  That's what used to be called 'Quality of Life Crimes'. 

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20636 on: April 24, 2013, 10:21:50 AM »
Dr. F, it may not have been a person.  I was cursing the person who was breaking my lilies off last summer.  At which point, my neighbours informed me that the squirrels were climbing up the tree and taking a flying leap at the lilies to break the blooms off.

If it was a person, they deserve special snowflake status.  Can we bestow it upon squirrels?   :)

Yes.  Some stole my bird feeder a few years ago!  They ate their way through half of the plastic bottom, then gave up and dragged it up the garden.

I went to the pet shop to buy a new feeder, asking "This is going to sound odd, but have you got any really strong bird feeders? You see, the squirrels..." at which point the lady laughed and said, "Yeah, you're not the first.  Metal feeders are over there."

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20637 on: April 24, 2013, 10:25:17 AM »
Metal feeders aren't the whole solution, though.  I had one, hanging on a tree branch.  The squirrels jumped up and down on the branch until the feeder fell to the ground and the top came off!

I now have a 'Squirrel Buster' feeder.  It has a mechanism whereby if the weight is too much on the perches, it closed over the seed holes.  It works for larger birds, too, like the dang starlings and grackles.  Rats with wings, they are.
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Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20638 on: April 24, 2013, 10:28:04 AM »
Now I'm laughing, imagining them standing around the stolen feeder going "What the #($@? It's not refilling! Where are the seeds?"
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MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20639 on: April 24, 2013, 10:43:40 AM »
My dad had trouble with squirrels and his feeder, too.  If he hung it from a tree, they'd climb down the line to the feeder.  So he put it on a tall pole.  They'd try climbing up the pole, and sometimes be successful.  They'd also climb up the nearby trees, go out on branches, and divebomb the feeder.  These were 50-feet tall trees and the branches were nowhere nearby.  Those guys are determined!  They also burrowed holes into the trash cans.
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