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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6396198 times)

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Hmmmmm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20655 on: April 24, 2013, 01:11:44 PM »
My DH was telling me about an article that was posted at our daycare. (I presume to read and discuss at home.) The gist of it was that we're all teaching our kids to be TOO polite, which is causing other children to become entitled and think that they can get anything if they ask for it, and perhaps we should teach our children to refuse to share.

I told DH that I don't think our DD that shares is the problem...

That is really interesting - any way you could post the article?

This is a link to the story I heard on the news about this.
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/lifestyle/2013/04/should-little-kids-be-forced-to-share-in-preschool/

I found it interesting because when my kids were toddlers their day care had a specific policy about having to "wait your turn" and if someone was playing with something the other child didn't have to give it up just because you asked for it. But a kid also couldn't be a "toy hog" and just keep it because someone else wanted it.

I really didn't understand the need for the story. To me the rules were simple and easily understood by the 2 yr olds and older:
-I don't have to let you play with a communal toy because you ask, but I can if I want to.
-If I ask and am told no, I can't throw a fit until I get my way and tattling to the teacher will just get me in trouble.
-If I'm finished with the communal toy, I shouldn't hold on to it. Especially if I'm only doing it because I know you want it. And I'll get in trouble from the teacher if I do this.

ETA:  Are there really schools who say anytime someone asks you for a toy you MUST share it?


BabyMama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20656 on: April 24, 2013, 01:28:49 PM »
That's probably it, thanks!
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Hillia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20657 on: April 24, 2013, 01:32:52 PM »
My grandpa told me he put vaseline on the pole that supported their bird feeder, thinking the squirrels would just slide down and not be able to get to it.  No, instead they just climbed up and slid down till they wore all the vaseline off and finally got to the seed.

Lololol that's awesome  :D

It's like a restaurant with a play area!

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Kariachi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20658 on: April 24, 2013, 01:38:50 PM »
Quote from: Kariachi
I've only seen my father shoot at two living things with his BB gun, a cat that was harassing ours(as in would chase out cats into the house, follow them, and then try to mark our walls) and the flippin grackles.

 :o
I really don't know anything about BB guns, but isn't there a danger, especially indoors, of the projectiles ricocheting and actually injuring one of the cats - or even people nearby?

We'd chase him out of the house and he'd then hang around around our yard so our cats couldn't go outside without him coming at them. Finally one day my dad chased him out, grabbed his BB gun, and took a shot. We haven't had trouble with the local strays since. An amazing feat given how many of the darn things there are around here. I swear we have more strays than squirrels.
"Heh. Forgive our manners, little creature that we may well kill and eat you is no excuse for rudeness."

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20659 on: April 24, 2013, 02:13:27 PM »
Quote
The gist of it was that we're all teaching our kids to be TOO polite, which is causing other children to become entitled and think that they can get anything if they ask for it, and perhaps we should teach our children to refuse to share.
I may have posted this before, somewhere in this thread...

I volunteer at a museum, where I do programs for 4th graders (about age 9). At one point, I show them a sample of real gold. About every 4th or 5th program, one of the students will say "Can I have it?" in that tone that implies "Ask and ye shall receive." I've been wondering why so many kids seem to think that a museum will be happy to hand over a valuable specimen, just because they asked.

Nutrax
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TeamBhakta

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20660 on: April 24, 2013, 02:29:05 PM »
My grandpa told me he put vaseline on the pole that supported their bird feeder, thinking the squirrels would just slide down and not be able to get to it.  No, instead they just climbed up and slid down till they wore all the vaseline off and finally got to the seed.

Dave Barry was right. Squirrels are sneaky and plotting to take over the world. 

Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20661 on: April 24, 2013, 02:55:37 PM »
My DH was telling me about an article that was posted at our daycare. (I presume to read and discuss at home.) The gist of it was that we're all teaching our kids to be TOO polite, which is causing other children to become entitled and think that they can get anything if they ask for it, and perhaps we should teach our children to refuse to share.

I told DH that I don't think our DD that shares is the problem...

I didn't read the article but there was a piece on it on GMA.  Once you hear the whole thing, it makes quite a bit of sense. 

The school in the piece had multiples of toys so that several children could be playing with the same item at the same time.  It also makes sense to teach children that they don't necessarily have to hand over something just because someone has taken a shine to it. 

Of course, sharing is important to learn but it's also important to learn how to handle the occasional 'No'. 

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20662 on: April 24, 2013, 03:35:58 PM »
I remember when my daughter was small and asked for something that she plain couldn't have - I can't remember what it was, but for the sake of argument, let's say that it was a very expensive toy.  The way she phrased it was "Please will you buy me that?"  When I said "No, honey, it's too expensive," she sputtered in outrage "But I said PLEASE!".  :)

NyaChan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20663 on: April 24, 2013, 03:44:18 PM »
I remember when my daughter was small and asked for something that she plain couldn't have - I can't remember what it was, but for the sake of argument, let's say that it was a very expensive toy.  The way she phrased it was "Please will you buy me that?"  When I said "No, honey, it's too expensive," she sputtered in outrage "But I said PLEASE!".  :)

I'm a bit embarrassed to say it, but I remember something similar in my own childhood.  I think I had asked my mom and sister to turn on the radio and I still remember this sense of shock that I had politely asked and yet they were flouting my will  ;)

LazyDaisy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20664 on: April 24, 2013, 03:44:39 PM »
DP and I have an ongoing debate of sorts going on this point - I say, it's better to avoid the accident than be right. She's more of a 'it's my right of way, no you can't share it, you'll get the ticket not me' on these things.


One of my favorite "funny" epitaphs:
Quote
This is the grave of Mike ODay
Who died maintaining his right of way.
His right was clear, his will was strong,
But hes just as dead as if hed been wrong.

I love that :-)

One of my favorite lines that I use in the context of relationships and also at work is "would you rather be right or happy?"  'cos picking your battles is wise.

I think my grandfather had that in mind when he told me, at a very young age, that people had the right of way when crossing the road, but cars were bigger, and cars would win if they hit me, and being right wouldn't keep me alive.  I think I was about 5 years old.


Please, no legal advice on this forum.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2013, 03:57:27 PM by cass2591 »
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NyaChan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20665 on: April 24, 2013, 04:02:05 PM »
SS story -

I was reading at Starbucks and grabbed a 2 person table since I was alone.  Another girl walked in and grabbed the only large table which seats 6 people.  Doesn't spread out, just pulls out one laptop and puts her bag on the chair.  In comes a group of 4 people.  They look around, see only small circle tables and then this one large table.  They ask the girl if they can use the table since they have a group.  The girl pushes back in her chair, throws her hands up in outrage, and stage whispers with this intense outrage - "I'm working here!"  I almost laughed out loud - I was sitting behind her and she was totally on Failblog.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20666 on: April 24, 2013, 04:02:27 PM »
My grandpa told me he put vaseline on the pole that supported their bird feeder, thinking the squirrels would just slide down and not be able to get to it.  No, instead they just climbed up and slid down till they wore all the vaseline off and finally got to the seed.

Lololol that's awesome  :D

Some greasy SS squirrels there.

MrTango

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20667 on: April 24, 2013, 04:02:38 PM »
My grandpa found a solution to the squirrel/bird feeder problem: electric fence.

Since he operated a dairy farm, they already had an electric fence around the pastures, so it was an easy task to run a cable to his bird feeder and install a chicken-wire basket around the iron pole (insulated with a heavy-duty rubber wrap).

I was surprised that the shock (voltage meant to contain large animals) didn't seem to do any lasting harm to the little squirrels.  I was also surprised that it frequently took 3-4 tries before a squirrel would give up.

bloo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20668 on: April 24, 2013, 04:06:20 PM »
My DH was telling me about an article that was posted at our daycare. (I presume to read and discuss at home.) The gist of it was that we're all teaching our kids to be TOO polite, which is causing other children to become entitled and think that they can get anything if they ask for it, and perhaps we should teach our children to refuse to share.

I told DH that I don't think our DD that shares is the problem...

I didn't read the article but there was a piece on it on GMA.  Once you hear the whole thing, it makes quite a bit of sense. 

The school in the piece had multiples of toys so that several children could be playing with the same item at the same time.  It also makes sense to teach children that they don't necessarily have to hand over something just because someone has taken a shine to it. 

Of course, sharing is important to learn but it's also important to learn how to handle the occasional 'No'.

I remember having this discussion with my 15 yo DD about 5 years ago. We were in the multimedia center of the library and my DD was playing video games. I was reading a magazine while she played and 5 unsupervised siblings* came trooping in and the youngest was probably 3. Her older sister was watching her (I'm guessing she was anywhere from 13-15) and just thought it was 'so cute' when the 3 yo crawled into my DD's lap and took the game controller from her...which - to my chagrin - my 10 yo DD just let her take (it isn't like my DD 'let's' her brother grab a game controller right out of her hands).

So I put my magazine down, plucked the controller out of the 3 yo's hands and handed it back to DD. Then I took the 3 yo off of her lap and handed her to her sister saying, 'You need to take her'. I then kept a polite smile on my face and explained to DD, in front of the other girls, "You do not need to give something up just because someone else wants it. Unless you want to. Do you want to quit playing? Have you had a long enough turn?"

DD said, "No, I wasn't done. It's been 5 minutes (library rules give them 30)."

I said, "Okay," and picked up my magazine while the other teen stood there holding her sister, trying to puzzle out what just happened.

I definitely think my kids learned to 'overshare' because they actually had to be taught that it's okay to not share sometimes!

*all have some kind of developmental delay as well as physical problems - they regularly come in, cause a ruckus, and then get chucked out by the library staff. Parents are nice but 'off'. I have no idea why they don't just come into the library with them.

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20669 on: April 24, 2013, 04:08:44 PM »
My grandpa found a solution to the squirrel/bird feeder problem: electric fence.

Since he operated a dairy farm, they already had an electric fence around the pastures, so it was an easy task to run a cable to his bird feeder and install a chicken-wire basket around the iron pole (insulated with a heavy-duty rubber wrap).

I was surprised that the shock (voltage meant to contain large animals) didn't seem to do any lasting harm to the little squirrels.  I was also surprised that it frequently took 3-4 tries before a squirrel would give up.

If the squirrels weren't in contact with the ground, they wouldn't necessarily get a shock.
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