Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 4385691 times)

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hjaye

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21900 on: June 25, 2013, 05:41:04 PM »
Adelaide, I worked with someone like that.  He couldn't stop talking about how much he missed Toronto, how Toronto was much better than Winnipeg, and so on.  Also, the company he used to work for in Toronto was MUCH better than our company.  You can imagine how popular that made him, and a number of us said bluntly "Maybe you should go back, if you miss it so much."

I worked with someone like this as well.  He said he didn't like living in the US, we have an evil capitalist society that preys on the poor, yet he took a layoff to try and work from home day trading stocks.  He was originally from Vietnam, his parents and he were literally some of the boat people that risked everything to come here since they believed they could have a better life.  He kept saying how things were actually better in his home country, and I asked him one day "Why are you still here then?  there is nothing stopping you from going back to your home country, and it seems you're very unhappy with your way of life here."

His response was very vague.

I understand you may not like being here, but one of the nice things about this country, and thankfully a lot of other countries in this world, there are no laws preventing you from leaving.  You're free to pack and go where ever you want, when ever you want.

Yarnspinner

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21901 on: June 25, 2013, 06:34:09 PM »
Don't know if this is snowflake behavior or Harry Potter Do The Impossible Behavior, but this is the first thread I saw and I am lazy, so it's going here....

I had occasion to be in the Men's Clothing Department the other day and while I was looking for a shirt for my Dad, I could hear a discussion that was becoming heated.  I turned to look at the register and a patron was arguing with the clerk saying over and and over "But I BROUGHT the receipt!  It's still in the package.  I BROUGHT a receipt." 

When the clerk was able to get a word in edgewise he said "Sir, yes, you DO have a receipt and the shirt is still in the packing but if you look at the receipt, we don't take returns after three months and this receipt is five years old."

Yarnspinner

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21902 on: June 25, 2013, 06:38:02 PM »
Adelaide, I worked with someone like that.  He couldn't stop talking about how much he missed Toronto, how Toronto was much better than Winnipeg, and so on.  Also, the company he used to work for in Toronto was MUCH better than our company.  You can imagine how popular that made him, and a number of us said bluntly "Maybe you should go back, if you miss it so much."

I worked with someone like this as well.  He said he didn't like living in the US, we have an evil capitalist society that preys on the poor, yet he took a layoff to try and work from home day trading stocks.  He was originally from Vietnam, his parents and he were literally some of the boat people that risked everything to come here since they believed they could have a better life.  He kept saying how things were actually better in his home country, and I asked him one day "Why are you still here then?  there is nothing stopping you from going back to your home country, and it seems you're very unhappy with your way of life here."

His response was very vague.

I understand you may not like being here, but one of the nice things about this country, and thankfully a lot of other countries in this world, there are no laws preventing you from leaving.  You're free to pack and go where ever you want, when ever you want.

Oh, yeah.  Had a coworker who did the same thing.  EVERYTHING was so much better at home in Mother Country.  Medicine was better.  Sports were better.  Literature was better.  Fruit was better (even though, apparently, you had to stand in line for hours to buy one cherry, but it was apparently worth it).

And one day I had had enough and said "Why on earth are you still here?  I'm ready to leave now listening to your description.  Why ever did you leave such a paradise?"

And off he slunk without another word.  Someone told me later that, yes, once again, he and his family came over here to escape political repression and poverty.  I simply do not get it.

HyenaInPetticoats

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21903 on: June 25, 2013, 06:41:05 PM »
Iím very lucky to go to a very competitive university in central London, that attracts a lot of international and American students.

Most of the American students Iíve met have been absolutely lovely and down to earth, but I have also met many, who were completely gobsmacked that having money and an American passport doesnít give you a passport to Oxford or any UK university for that matter.  :-\

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21904 on: June 25, 2013, 06:47:54 PM »
It reminds me of an op-ed article that was once published in the Globe and Mail ("Canada's Newspaper"). The writer outlined all the horrible, horrible things that her father had gone through when moving to Canada, and how humiliated he was at having to take a job in maintenance at the local university. Because, you see, back in the old country he had a high government position, and they had a house with servants, and he was chauffeured back and forth to work on the government dime. She ended up by sneering about how Canada let down immigrants who came "for a better life".

I wondered just how much better a life he expected?
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mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21905 on: June 26, 2013, 01:34:33 AM »
I only thought I knew what an SS driver was before today. I am currently "at work" with my boyfriend. He is a long haul truck driver. I have been astounded at the cruddy things drivers of passenger cars will do to trucks. Thank diety my guy is an excellent driver who makes this look easy, but man there have been some moments that have made me wonder if my life insurance policy is sufficient.

starry diadem

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21906 on: June 26, 2013, 03:52:33 AM »

Oh, yeah.  Had a coworker who did the same thing.  EVERYTHING was so much better at home in Mother Country.  Medicine was better.  Sports were better.  Literature was better.  Fruit was better (even though, apparently, you had to stand in line for hours to buy one cherry, but it was apparently worth it).

And one day I had had enough and said "Why on earth are you still here?  I'm ready to leave now listening to your description.  Why ever did you leave such a paradise?"

And off he slunk without another word.  Someone told me later that, yes, once again, he and his family came over here to escape political repression and poverty.  I simply do not get it.

Simply, it was his home once, with everything indefinable that made it his place, where every stick and stone of it was part of who he is, part of him; where he understood how everything worked and how he fitted in.  However poor it was and however unpleasant, it was his *home*. And now he's lost it, and he evidently doesn't yet feel that the US has become home.

That said, it's the height of bad manners to constantly be decrying the US, which has given him refuge.  I can be irritated by it, yet understand it. I'd miss home, too.
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Mel the Redcap

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21907 on: June 26, 2013, 04:50:40 AM »

Oh, yeah.  Had a coworker who did the same thing.  EVERYTHING was so much better at home in Mother Country.  Medicine was better.  Sports were better.  Literature was better.  Fruit was better (even though, apparently, you had to stand in line for hours to buy one cherry, but it was apparently worth it).

And one day I had had enough and said "Why on earth are you still here?  I'm ready to leave now listening to your description.  Why ever did you leave such a paradise?"

And off he slunk without another word.  Someone told me later that, yes, once again, he and his family came over here to escape political repression and poverty.  I simply do not get it.

Simply, it was his home once, with everything indefinable that made it his place, where every stick and stone of it was part of who he is, part of him; where he understood how everything worked and how he fitted in.  However poor it was and however unpleasant, it was his *home*. And now he's lost it, and he evidently doesn't yet feel that the US has become home.

That said, it's the height of bad manners to constantly be decrying the US, which has given him refuge.  I can be irritated by it, yet understand it. I'd miss home, too.

I think if you're emigrating to get away from something, rather than to go to something you want, it's easier to be nostalgic and wistful about the bits of your old country that didn't suck. If only that one bad thing (like, say, imminent risk of death) hadn't been there, it would have been perfect.

Some time before I met my now husband, the Good Ethnic Boy, he sort of lost a girlfriend to "Other Country Is So Much BETTER" Syndrome. She went to London for a short exchange program - I think three months - and when she came back she spent weeks moping around and pining (audibly) about how London had been great, she missed London, London was better than here because ((insert reasons)), she wanted to go baaaack. Finally he snapped and told her "Well, go back then!"

She did. ;D Thus he was free when I met him. :-*

About four years later, he gritted his teeth and was supportive when I went on a student exchange to Japan for a year, despite being terrified that history would repeat itself. (He also cooks. The man's a keeper and I've got him, ladies. 8) )
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Nikko-chan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21908 on: June 26, 2013, 05:45:01 AM »
(He also cooks. The man's a keeper and I've got him, ladies. 8) )

Hey, can I borrow him? The Boyfriend doesn't know how to cook... also: he doesn't know how to eat. He needs to be taught ;)

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21909 on: June 26, 2013, 07:50:56 AM »

Oh, yeah.  Had a coworker who did the same thing.  EVERYTHING was so much better at home in Mother Country.  Medicine was better.  Sports were better.  Literature was better.  Fruit was better (even though, apparently, you had to stand in line for hours to buy one cherry, but it was apparently worth it).

And one day I had had enough and said "Why on earth are you still here?  I'm ready to leave now listening to your description.  Why ever did you leave such a paradise?"

And off he slunk without another word.  Someone told me later that, yes, once again, he and his family came over here to escape political repression and poverty.  I simply do not get it.

Simply, it was his home once, with everything indefinable that made it his place, where every stick and stone of it was part of who he is, part of him; where he understood how everything worked and how he fitted in.  However poor it was and however unpleasant, it was his *home*. And now he's lost it, and he evidently doesn't yet feel that the US has become home.

That said, it's the height of bad manners to constantly be decrying the US, which has given him refuge.  I can be irritated by it, yet understand it. I'd miss home, too.

I can understand that. I remember one of my aunts telling me that when she and her siblings were kids they'd fantasize out loud about having a rich relative back in Ireland.  (Grandpa was of the first generation of that branch born in the US, Grandma's family came over mid 1800's)  Grandpa would say "If we had a rich relative in Ireland, we never would have left in the first place."   I know there were a lot of Irish reluctant to leave their homes but didn't have much of a choice due to finances or other reasons.
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blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21910 on: June 26, 2013, 09:42:23 AM »

Oh, yeah.  Had a coworker who did the same thing.  EVERYTHING was so much better at home in Mother Country.  Medicine was better.  Sports were better.  Literature was better.  Fruit was better (even though, apparently, you had to stand in line for hours to buy one cherry, but it was apparently worth it).

And one day I had had enough and said "Why on earth are you still here?  I'm ready to leave now listening to your description.  Why ever did you leave such a paradise?"

And off he slunk without another word.  Someone told me later that, yes, once again, he and his family came over here to escape political repression and poverty.  I simply do not get it.

Simply, it was his home once, with everything indefinable that made it his place, where every stick and stone of it was part of who he is, part of him; where he understood how everything worked and how he fitted in.  However poor it was and however unpleasant, it was his *home*. And now he's lost it, and he evidently doesn't yet feel that the US has become home.

That said, it's the height of bad manners to constantly be decrying the US, which has given him refuge.  I can be irritated by it, yet understand it. I'd miss home, too.

I can understand that. I remember one of my aunts telling me that when she and her siblings were kids they'd fantasize out loud about having a rich relative back in Ireland.  (Grandpa was of the first generation of that branch born in the US, Grandma's family came over mid 1800's)  Grandpa would say "If we had a rich relative in Ireland, we never would have left in the first place."   I know there were a lot of Irish reluctant to leave their homes but didn't have much of a choice due to finances or other reasons.

I have rich relatives in Scotland. They apparently don't want anything to do with us because we are peasants! ;D
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TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21911 on: June 26, 2013, 10:12:51 AM »
And one day I had had enough and said "Why on earth are you still here?  I'm ready to leave now listening to your description.  Why ever did you leave such a paradise?"

And off he slunk without another word.  Someone told me later that, yes, once again, he and his family came over here to escape political repression and poverty.  I simply do not get it.

Well, actually that makes sense.

He didn't leave because he wanted to. He really would rather have stayed. And he's homesick for it.

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21912 on: June 26, 2013, 10:31:47 AM »
I nominate these kids and their parents.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXg_YsPagUM


To me it is unacceptable to scream at the animals or bang on their enclosures. To bad Harry Potter wasn't there to put them in their place - without any harm coming to the gorilla.


We were in the new African Exhibit at the Houston Zoo. At the chimp enclosure there is this part that sticks out and has a shower head for them to cool off I guess. There was a chimp in the shower stall and people crowded around to see. Someone tripped and hit the "glass" and the chimp startled- vocalized and hit the glass back. This woman then started to try and get all the kids to thump the glass. Before I could react Loren grabbed Brett got out of the group around the stall and ran to a zoo keeper calling out "zoo keeper that lady is trying to hurt the chimp". The zoo keeper said something on her walkie talkie and got between the woman and one exit. Loren and Brett came over to me (I had been standing back from the crowd, reading the wall about conservation efforts) and we left. I was worried about that SS going off on Loren. So I don't know what happened. I hope her group was kicked out for the day and that she was banned.


Our last trip was full of out of control day cares with the day care staff screaming at the kids and the kids shoving Loren and Brett around and screaming so loud we couldn't hear the zoo keeper talk. (He did call for someone to come deal with them) We left early. As we left we ran into another group that was easily 5 times the number of kids as the earlier groups. (they were still in their whole group) Their adults were projecting but not yelling when giving instructions. They were cleaning up the Plaza area where they had just had lunch. While there was a level of noise from the kids talking there was no screaming and they were picking up trash I'm pretty sure other groups had left. The last group was from a YMCA. The number of the Y was on the backs of their shirts. I noted it down on my phone. Later I called them and told the head of the summer camp program how terrific their kids and staff were.
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Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21913 on: June 26, 2013, 10:57:39 AM »
I nominate these kids and their parents.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXg_YsPagUM


To me it is unacceptable to scream at the animals or bang on their enclosures.
There are several posts over on notalwaysright.com where SS zoogoers want the keepers to go into the enclosures and "make them do something."  Because going into the lion/tiger/bear enclosure and poking them with a stick is SUCH a good idea.  ::)
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Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #21914 on: June 26, 2013, 11:34:42 AM »
My family could be considered immigrants - we're British, and we moved to Canada when I was a baby.  Why?  Because we had a chance for a much better life - even at that time, the job prospects in the U.K. were a bit dicey.  My parents love Canada and, much as they might miss Britain, would never move back there.   Contrast that with a friend of my mother's who was a British war bride - she never stopped referring to England as "home", even after she'd lived here for 50 years!