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Special Snowflake Stories

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Bexx27:

--- Quote from: 3angels on July 09, 2013, 10:39:13 AM ---Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their

--- End quote ---

 :o Where are you located? My hospital would not allow children into the maternity ward with the exception of soon-to-be siblings. Other than medical personnel, only the father and one other person designated by the mother were allowed in the delivery room. More people could visit in the recovery room, but only the father could stay overnight. And the room certainly didn't have couches for people to hang out!

kherbert05:

--- Quote from: 3angels on July 09, 2013, 10:39:13 AM ---Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their

--- End quote ---
If they are still there have all the kids call their parents they have average travel time from their home to hospital - 10 minutes to pick up the kids or the cops will be called and the children turned over as abandoned and the parents can deal with CPS to get the kids back. You would be amazed how fast that gets lazy cell donors to move.

Why in the world did someone not call the friends' parents and tell them their children were dropped off unsupervised in the maternity ward? There is a good chance they think those kids are at the home of their friend.

Pen^2:
When I was a child, the school nurse had a large dog that she brought to work. It wasn't approved, but even if it was, I don't think it's remotely appropriate to have a pet in a nurse's office with sick children. There were complaints, of course, but this woman was so SS that she would turn up late to work so no other staff would see her arrive, and bring the dog in anyway. Clearly they had a problem with hiring someone new, although I don't know why.

Us students were aware of the problem. Those of us who were unfortunate enough to have dog allergies (more common than you'd think, it turns out) would have trouble approaching the nurse for anything. She always dismissed any requests to perhaps not be standing next to a large, fluffy, allergy-causing animal as, "oh, he's not bothering anyone!" despite being told that he very much was just by being present. One girl in my year couldn't walk directly past this woman's office and had to take a detour just because the presence of dog hair alone was enough to set her off, so strong were her allergies.

Usually we'd just convince a friend to feign illness and transfer the bandaids, aspirin, etc. to us afterwards. This involved fake tablet-swallowing in front of this nurse, and an almost black market-level of trade of medical goods, not to mention very poor first aid done by children on other children, attempting to copy what they'd seen the nurse do. Whenever I see prison films where they trade with cigarettes, I know just what it's like.

This SS woman put her dog in front of the very children she was hired to care for. And caused a lot of unnecessary unsafe and medically-unsound activity in the school.

Shoo:
I'm also wondering what the heck kind of hospital this is.  I've never been to a maternity ward where children who weren't the patient's were even allowed in the labor room.  Let alone a group of children alone, unsupervised, just dropped off and left to fend for themselves.  Where on earth were the nurses during this time?

stargazer:

--- Quote from: Bexx27 on July 09, 2013, 11:50:57 AM ---
--- Quote from: 3angels on July 09, 2013, 10:39:13 AM ---Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their

--- End quote ---

 :o Where are you located? My hospital would not allow children into the maternity ward with the exception of soon-to-be siblings. Other than medical personnel, only the father and one other person designated by the mother were allowed in the delivery room. More people could visit in the recovery room, but only the father could stay overnight. And the room certainly didn't have couches for people to hang out!

--- End quote ---

This.  I have never heard of a hospital allowing this, ESPECIALLY in the maternity ward.  And couches?

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