Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5047070 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22215 on: July 12, 2013, 11:20:11 AM »
Or why  I LOVE a cinema about 15 miles from us.  All showings after 6PM are over 21 only.  You can have dinner in the theater, Beer & wine available & no kids.  DH & I can see a movie, have dinner & a glass of wine and spend about $20.00 total.  Pretty cheap for a date.  ;D 

Same theater also has a weekly showing for folks with sensory issues.  Lights are kept on at a medium level, sound levels turned down & people are free to sing, dance, walk around,
& do whatever makes them comfortable.  I think it is a great idea.

Alamo Drafthouse?

Nope, Northern Lights Cinema in Nampa, Idaho.  Tickets are $3.00 each & food is pretty reasonable & generous portions. They have pulled out every other row of seats & put in long skinny tables.  Love the place.

Ooh. I must file this away for when I finally get around to visiting my family in Nampa.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22216 on: July 12, 2013, 11:25:39 AM »
Personally, I don't mind small outbursts from small children at movies that are geared towards them. But I'm talking like momentary reactions that are obviously what the movie is aiming for (gasping when something startling happens, laughing at jokes, etc.).

With little kids, you sometimes get a little bit more of a reaction than what you'd get from an adult, but if it's brief and caused by something that happened in the movie, I tend not to mind it. Sometimes, it makes the movie even more awesome. :)

One example is when my husband and I went to see Brave. There's a scene where a whole group of men get down from a castle roof after being locked up there by taking off their kilts to make a rope ladder. So once they get down, there's a shot of them all walking back inside with nothing covering their backsides. One little boy exclaimed quite loudly that "their butts are naked!" or something similar, because he thought it was the most hilarious thing he had ever seen. It was honestly funnier than the movie scene itself.

Or when we went to see Tangled, there was a small group of girls that were just totally, totally in love with Flynn Rider, and had a vocal but not unexpected reaction to the scene where he and Rapunzel are in the boat with all the lights floating around. It was adorable.

Children who are upset should definitely be taken out of the theater, for their own sake as much as for everyone else's. Children who can't stay in their seats don't need to be watching movies until they are able to sit still. Children who are being noisy because they aren't paying attention also don't need to be in the theater. But I do give children who are momentarily loud because they are watching and enjoying the movie a definite pass. If they quiet down (especially if their parents encourage them to quiet down) and are otherwise well-behaved, I'm cool with that.

That is what should be expected when you watch a children's movie. Not total chaos caused by children who are too young or too disinterested to pay attention and/or enjoy the movie.

Yes, and this is exaclty what I was trying to convey to certain people but I was shot down, saying since I don't HAVE my own kids, I don't know how difficult it is, and so on. I was like, yes, I get that, BUT there's a kid being a kid, and a kid who shouldn't be there as they can't behave.

While I don't have any kids, my parents did take me to the movies as a child, and had I ever exhibited any behavoirs like I saw, I would have been removed swiftly from the theater.

I get, and have no problem with kids showing excitement, or in your example - wonderment at the "nekkid butts" Kids will be kids, and as long as they don't do it throughout the entire movie, I'm fine.

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22217 on: July 12, 2013, 11:28:33 AM »
I think that part of why we go to theatres is the shared experience of a movie. It can make a good movie great. Oohs, ahhs, squeals of delight or horror - it's part of the immersive environment, to know that other people are reacting emotionally to the content beside you.

What detracts from a movie is an audience (young or old) acting as if the movie is secondary to whatever else they are doing.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22218 on: July 12, 2013, 12:02:29 PM »
I remember my dad taking me to see a revival of Bambi when I was about ten years old.  When Bambi's mother bit the dust, there was a little girl (probably about 4) who announced "Daddy, I know what happened to Bambi's mom.  She got shoooooooootttt."

Hillia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22219 on: July 12, 2013, 12:03:41 PM »
I think that part of why we go to theatres is the shared experience of a movie. It can make a good movie great. Oohs, ahhs, squeals of delight or horror - it's part of the immersive environment, to know that other people are reacting emotionally to the content beside you.

What detracts from a movie is an audience (young or old) acting as if the movie is secondary to whatever else they are doing.

This, exactly.

I like to think I added to someone's experience of the movie Predator (the remake, with Adrian Brody).  I was watching intently, and at a particularly startling scene, let out a yelp and tossed my popcorn bag into the air, showering the people in front of me with (fortunately unbuttered) popcorn.  I was mortified and apologized in whispers; they thought it was hysterical, as did the rest of the group with me and a few other patrons who saw what happened.  I'd never done that before, and never since.

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Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22220 on: July 12, 2013, 12:51:20 PM »
I did it too, Hillia - half a pack of Matchmakers down the neck of the man in front at something involving large spiders. Indiana Jones, perhaps? My dad and the man's wife thought it was hysterically funny. The man and me, not so much.

RegionMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22221 on: July 12, 2013, 01:05:59 PM »
Opening wkend of the final Twilight movie-
you could tell who had read the books by the exclamations at the final fight scene. 
:)
But then, as a wave, the audience ran with it, enjoying and cringing as it went on, with a collective, "Whoa!  Did NOT see that coming!"  at the reveal.  We had been taken for a collective ride, and enjoyed it, together.

A friend of mine went with a later audience, with those who may not have read the books, just went along, and did not get the same theatre experience. 

Still, either showing was fine except for the two women that sat nicely through all the previews, and then decide to open all their cellophane wrapped and crunchy candies when the real movie began.  Arghgh!

Fear is temporary...Regret is forever.

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22222 on: July 12, 2013, 01:12:25 PM »
I remember watching the original Carrie in the theatre shortly after it came out.

There is a scene at the end - you know the one I mean, if you've seen it. I remember the audience reaction. I swear, the entire building shot off the foundations about a foot.

It wouldn't be the same if half the audience had been looking at their cell phones at the time.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

MissRose

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22223 on: July 12, 2013, 04:32:38 PM »
We went to see the subtitled version of a Studio Ghibli film, the cinema was showing dubbed and subtitled at multiple different showings, we got to share the cinema with a woman who read the subtitles to her child.

When I was visiting a friend in Denmark, we went to a movie.  She prefers to wait to see films when it is less likely there will be children present as the popular American film series she enjoys like Harry Potter and Twilight are played in English but subtitles are in Danish.  She said after going to a Harry Potter film where the parents were reading the subtitles aloud, she started going in evenings when kids are in bed or during day when it is more likely they will be in school to not be disturbed as much.  She understands and speaks both Danish & English.

MissRose

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22224 on: July 12, 2013, 04:35:02 PM »
My biggest pet-peeve in movie theaters is the cell-phone.  I've decided that if I were rich enough to do so, I'd build a movie theater where every part of the building except the lobby was surrounded by a faraday cage.  Any staff or emergency communication within the building could be through hard-wired devices.

That's one thing that made me very happy when I went to see The Lone Ranger last Saturday.  There was an announcement that any cell phone use during the movie would earn the user an escort out of the movie without a refund.  That's a new policy since the last time I was there, and it made me forgive them the endless commercials before the movie started.

I like those announcements too but then again you got the SS's who still keep them on for no good reason.  I give bonus SS points to those who leave them on at church, and do not either place them on silent, vibrate or off - trust me I gave some mentally recently to a few SS's that had phones going off during Mass.

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22225 on: July 12, 2013, 04:37:21 PM »
My parents used to take me to a live theatre production every year for my birthday.  It was usually something family-friendly like The Sound of Music or Cinderella.   I REALLY enjoyed those shows, and when I say I enjoyed them, I mean that I laughed my 8-year-old head off at the funny parts.    I remember getting some amused looks from the audience around me, but I bet I got a few annoyed "Geez, can you shut that kid up?" looks, too.    It's 40 years later, but if any of those folks are reading this - I'm sorry!  :)

MissRose

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22226 on: July 12, 2013, 04:37:48 PM »
Opening wkend of the final Twilight movie-
you could tell who had read the books by the exclamations at the final fight scene. 
:)
But then, as a wave, the audience ran with it, enjoying and cringing as it went on, with a collective, "Whoa!  Did NOT see that coming!"  at the reveal.  We had been taken for a collective ride, and enjoyed it, together.

A friend of mine went with a later audience, with those who may not have read the books, just went along, and did not get the same theatre experience. 

Still, either showing was fine except for the two women that sat nicely through all the previews, and then decide to open all their cellophane wrapped and crunchy candies when the real movie began.  Arghgh!

I chose to see the last 2 Twilight films on Friday mornings when I knew that it was less likely to have the cinema packed full of teenagers who screamed every time Jacob shed his shirt - the experience I had when seeing Eclipse at a midnight showing.  It was like I was at a strip club at times. 

NyaChan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22227 on: July 12, 2013, 04:57:14 PM »
Opening wkend of the final Twilight movie-
you could tell who had read the books by the exclamations at the final fight scene. 
:)
But then, as a wave, the audience ran with it, enjoying and cringing as it went on, with a collective, "Whoa!  Did NOT see that coming!"  at the reveal.  We had been taken for a collective ride, and enjoyed it, together.

A friend of mine went with a later audience, with those who may not have read the books, just went along, and did not get the same theatre experience. 

Still, either showing was fine except for the two women that sat nicely through all the previews, and then decide to open all their cellophane wrapped and crunchy candies when the real movie began.  Arghgh!

I chose to see the last 2 Twilight films on Friday mornings when I knew that it was less likely to have the cinema packed full of teenagers who screamed every time Jacob shed his shirt - the experience I had when seeing Eclipse at a midnight showing.  It was like I was at a strip club at times.

haha sounds like when my very quiet and conservative friend accidentally watched Magic Mike (she thought it was a kids movie when she went in  ::)) - came back shaking her head "The women! You'd think they'd never seen a man before!"

jedikaiti

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22228 on: July 12, 2013, 05:04:13 PM »
My parents used to take me to a live theatre production every year for my birthday.  It was usually something family-friendly like The Sound of Music or Cinderella.   I REALLY enjoyed those shows, and when I say I enjoyed them, I mean that I laughed my 8-year-old head off at the funny parts.    I remember getting some amused looks from the audience around me, but I bet I got a few annoyed "Geez, can you shut that kid up?" looks, too.    It's 40 years later, but if any of those folks are reading this - I'm sorry!  :)

When I was 5, my parents took me to see Annie on Broadway. I apparently stood on my seat, clapping and yelling "neato". I think just during the applause times, though - if I'd done it during the whole thing, I'm quite certain they would have shushed me or taken me outside for a stern lecture.
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norrina

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22229 on: July 12, 2013, 05:12:25 PM »
Parking lot SS observed today.

We have a large parking lot at our local post office, with ample angle-in parking, all the spaces being wide enough to easily accommodate an SUV or large pick-up truck. The row of spots directly in front of the building has a curb at either end. When I got to the PO today, I parked in a spot third from the end, and another car immediately thereafter parked in the spot second from the end. The end spot was empty, and I was smack dab in the middle of my spot.

The driver of the other car (DD for demanding driver) and I both went in to check our mailboxes, and came back to our cars at the same time. A van had just parked in the end spot. He was closer to the curb side of the spot than in the middle; however, because DD had parked on the line of his spot, there wasn't a lot of room between the vehicles, and DD was a larger gentleman. Cue DD motioning for the van driver (OD for other driver) to roll his window down so that DD could tell OD that he needed to repark his van so that DD could get into his car. And OD did it! OD ended up with his tires up on the curb to accommodate DD's bad parking job. I'm not sure it would be eHell approved, but if it had been me that DD was demanding repark my vehicle, I would have told him that he was welcome to wait for me to finish my transaction and vacate the spot altogether.