Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5077301 times)

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23010 on: August 22, 2013, 09:37:10 PM »
Some people truly are revolting aren't they?  What the heck do they expect the family to do?

Live in a ghetto with all the other undesirables (i.e. - not like me!)
Or institutionalize the child, because EVERYBODY knows that ALL handicapped children have no more brains than a head of lettuce and should be put away where other people don't have to think about them.   ::)

The sister of my friend shared something on fbook, an album of about 300 photos taken of suitcases left at an asylum, and it is said that the people never saw their families again, and when they were died, were buried in unmarked graves behind the asylum.    :'(  That made me tear up when I read it and I couldn't look at the whole album in the article, it just made me too sad to think of all these abandoned people and unmarked graves and think of how the mentally ill were once treated.
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LadyClaire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23011 on: August 22, 2013, 09:40:55 PM »
Some people truly are revolting aren't they?  What the heck do they expect the family to do?

Live in a ghetto with all the other undesirables (i.e. - not like me!)
Or institutionalize the child, because EVERYBODY knows that ALL handicapped children have no more brains than a head of lettuce and should be put away where other people don't have to think about them.   ::)

The sister of my friend shared something on fbook, an album of about 300 photos taken of suitcases left at an asylum, and it is said that the people never saw their families again, and when they were died, were buried in unmarked graves behind the asylum.    :'(  That made me tear up when I read it and I couldn't look at the whole album in the article, it just made me too sad to think of all these abandoned people and unmarked graves and think of how the mentally ill were once treated.

I saw that same thing on facebook.

I also read an article where someone had published photos they'd found that had been taken of women who had been institutionalized back in Victorian times due to things like stress, depression, etc. Also very sad. So many people were locked away for things that shouldn't even have been classified as an actual mental illness.

Shea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23012 on: August 22, 2013, 09:47:51 PM »
http://fox59.com/2013/08/19/woman-wants-changes-at-library-after-grandson-checks-out-erotic-novel/#axzz2cWeZf4xd

To summarize - kid checks out adult erotic novel; grandma wants the novel removed from the library.  I agree with the library - the adult responsible for what this kid reads is not a library staff member.   I personally find this SS because her answer is to remove the book instead of suggesting that the erotic books and childrens books be moved so that they aren't on either side of the bookcase from each other (I could see how that would not be very clear to a child).  But removing the book entirely is like burning the forest because you don't like one type of flower that grows there.

The kid used the self-checkout, so even if the books were moved he could still have picked it up and walked out without a staff member ever seeing it. And we aren't allowed to censor people's reading anyway.

Exactly. I read the article, and it made me want to smack the woman upside the head with a rolled-up copy of the ALA Library Bill of Rights. A poster-sized copy.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 09:51:10 PM by Shea »


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Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23013 on: August 22, 2013, 09:58:37 PM »
Some people truly are revolting aren't they?  What the heck do they expect the family to do?

Keep their disabled child locked in the attic- if she never left the house, they wouldn't need a ramp, now would they?  ::)
Geez.

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23014 on: August 22, 2013, 10:08:17 PM »


I also read an article where someone had published photos they'd found that had been taken of women who had been institutionalized back in Victorian times due to things like stress, depression, etc. Also very sad. So many people were locked away for things that shouldn't even have been classified as an actual mental illness.
In the early 19th century, a wife could be committed because she did not keep house and cook to her husband's satisfaction. Because of course any mentally normal woman would have no other desire than to do just that, so if she didn't, she was ipso facto mentally ill. I'm sure that a trip to the asylum worked wonders in behavior modification...I'd think any sane woman would develop a great interest in housekeeping if the alternative were to be locked up in the 'lunatic asylum' as they were called at the time.

Miss March

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23015 on: August 22, 2013, 10:11:02 PM »
My sister once told our mother not to leave a certain heirloom to me, since I didn't have any children to pass it along to.

I've taken a lot of guff in my family for choosing not to have kids, but I think that was among the worst things said to me.

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gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23016 on: August 22, 2013, 10:17:30 PM »
My sister once told our mother not to leave a certain heirloom to me, since I didn't have any children to pass it along to.

I've taken a lot of guff in my family for choosing not to have kids, but I think that was among the worst things said to me.

And your Mother's response was ... ?

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23017 on: August 22, 2013, 10:30:47 PM »
My sister once told our mother not to leave a certain heirloom to me, since I didn't have any children to pass it along to.

I've taken a lot of guff in my family for choosing not to have kids, but I think that was among the worst things said to me.
I suppose she thought you'd sell it at a garage sale, rather than leave it to her children in your will? >:D

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23018 on: August 22, 2013, 10:37:18 PM »
Ugh. My uncle tried pulling something similar. He went whining to his parents with "Sis#1 (my mom) has a house, and Sis#2 has a house, but I don't!" He expected the parents to correct this travesty!

Yeah, the reason Sis#1 has a house is because she worked hard for it, and Sis#2 inherited hers through her DH. Parents informed him that they were not going to hand him a house on a silver platter.


My sister told my mother to take me out of the will because "She has a house and a vacation house, and her husband makes good money! She doesn't need any more!"  and "Brother has a good job as a teacher, he doesn't need money either! They have everything and I have nothing! They shouldn't be in the will!"

Hooboy.....

Youngest sister is single, unlike myself or our other sister. She has told us several times that she has more expenses than we do, since she is single. Also, she shouldn't ever be expected to buy a gift or send a card, but the first birthday and Christmas she didn't get a gift? There was a giant tantrum.

I am really not looking forward to estate issues when the time comes.

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23019 on: August 22, 2013, 10:45:38 PM »
Ugh. My uncle tried pulling something similar. He went whining to his parents with "Sis#1 (my mom) has a house, and Sis#2 has a house, but I don't!" He expected the parents to correct this travesty!

Yeah, the reason Sis#1 has a house is because she worked hard for it, and Sis#2 inherited hers through her DH. Parents informed him that they were not going to hand him a house on a silver platter.


My sister told my mother to take me out of the will because "She has a house and a vacation house, and her husband makes good money! She doesn't need any more!"  and "Brother has a good job as a teacher, he doesn't need money either! They have everything and I have nothing! They shouldn't be in the will!"

Hooboy.....

.... To which your mom replied?

snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23020 on: August 22, 2013, 11:32:32 PM »
My sister once told our mother not to leave a certain heirloom to me, since I didn't have any children to pass it along to.

I've taken a lot of guff in my family for choosing not to have kids, but I think that was among the worst things said to me.


Welcome to my world.  My aunt left me an engagement ring from her first ( failed) marriage, my mother has twice offered it to my brothers when they got married. It's lucky that I have it in a safe deposit box...and they won't let her in to it, having been warned.

jedikaiti

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23021 on: August 23, 2013, 12:44:08 AM »
Ugh. My uncle tried pulling something similar. He went whining to his parents with "Sis#1 (my mom) has a house, and Sis#2 has a house, but I don't!" He expected the parents to correct this travesty!

Yeah, the reason Sis#1 has a house is because she worked hard for it, and Sis#2 inherited hers through her DH. Parents informed him that they were not going to hand him a house on a silver platter.


My sister told my mother to take me out of the will because "She has a house and a vacation house, and her husband makes good money! She doesn't need any more!"  and "Brother has a good job as a teacher, he doesn't need money either! They have everything and I have nothing! They shouldn't be in the will!"

Hooboy.....

Please tell me your mother told her where to stick her ideas about will-making.
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poundcake

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23022 on: August 23, 2013, 01:19:03 AM »
This reminds me of the neighbors who taunted the child with Huntington's disease in Michigan. I don't know how any human being could stoop that low. I hope the police and crime analysis staff can find the source and speak with them.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/MindMoodNews/terminally-ill-year-olds-family-bullied-neighbors/story?id=11851233

I remember this. The nasty altercations began because the evil lady was mad that her neighbors' grandkids were playing in a bouncy house hired for a party in their backyard. Evil lady thought her kids should be able to go play in it, too, despite the fact that they were not invited to the party and the bouncy house was in the neighbors' back yard. Neighbor said no, and evil lady started the bullying to "get back" at her.

Barney girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23023 on: August 23, 2013, 04:14:17 AM »


I also read an article where someone had published photos they'd found that had been taken of women who had been institutionalized back in Victorian times due to things like stress, depression, etc. Also very sad. So many people were locked away for things that shouldn't even have been classified as an actual mental illness.
In the early 19th century, a wife could be committed because she did not keep house and cook to her husband's satisfaction. Because of course any mentally normal woman would have no other desire than to do just that, so if she didn't, she was ipso facto mentally ill. I'm sure that a trip to the asylum worked wonders in behavior modification...I'd think any sane woman would develop a great interest in housekeeping if the alternative were to be locked up in the 'lunatic asylum' as they were called at the time.

I was watching a programme about King Edward VII recently. When he was Prince of Wales he had an affair with a married woman. She was 20 years old. Her husband threatened to name the prince as co-respondent in divorce proceedings. It was mentioned almost in passing that her family had her committed to a lunatic asylum where she spent the rest of her life. I found that quite spine chilling.

blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23024 on: August 23, 2013, 04:31:41 AM »
Some people truly are revolting aren't they?  What the heck do they expect the family to do?

Live in a ghetto with all the other undesirables (i.e. - not like me!)
Or institutionalize the child, because EVERYBODY knows that ALL handicapped children have no more brains than a head of lettuce and should be put away where other people don't have to think about them.   ::)

The sister of my friend shared something on fbook, an album of about 300 photos taken of suitcases left at an asylum, and it is said that the people never saw their families again, and when they were died, were buried in unmarked graves behind the asylum.    :'(  That made me tear up when I read it and I couldn't look at the whole album in the article, it just made me too sad to think of all these abandoned people and unmarked graves and think of how the mentally ill were once treated.

Doesn't surprise me (even though it is awful). My father used to work for a mental institution. Some of his patients had grown up there - they were left there as babies or small children and never got out. Up until about the 80's, this was considered acceptable. When the place shut down and most of the patients went to group homes, Dad was actually pretty mad - the ones who had never been outside their whole lives had no idea what to do in a group home. He thought it was mean to just throw them in and expect them to adjust.
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