Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5619825 times)

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diesel_darlin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23100 on: August 26, 2013, 05:46:51 PM »
I work at a gas station. Today, a man threw his trash on the counter and politely informed me that now I had something to do.

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23101 on: August 26, 2013, 05:52:34 PM »
Good grief, d_d!  That makes me stabby.

I'm old enough to remember when kids were given everything, school supply-wise.  That included pens, pencils, and a fresh new pack of crayons.  (Honestly, was there anything more wonderful than brand-new Crayola crayons, with the points all pointy and the paper un-ripped?  Siiiigh.)  But yeah, that hasn't been the case in my hometown for decades. 

I remember one year when our daughter's list included playing cards and dice.  I joked that the teacher must be planning to teach them how to gamble.

shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23102 on: August 26, 2013, 06:00:32 PM »
I went with my SIL to pick up the kids from school today. As we were picking up the kids  a father walks into my niece's room and says "What's this list all about, public school is supposed to be free. IF you want my kid to have this stuff --you blanket-blank pay for it!" Slammed the school supply list on the desk and walked out.
 
  Honestly, we spent less than $10 for the entire list buying on sales, the list is not that onerous - and if you can't afford it, you can go to one of the food kitchens show them that you can't and get free stuff.

This reminds me it only happened 2 years but when I asked for a school supply list i was told something to the effect "well we cant tell you , you must provide anything but we have a list of things parents may want to donate to the school for their child's use"  something like that.   I was surprised that the classrooms now have at least one scientific calculator per student , for their use.

I did feel bad for the (what looked like grandparents ) buying school supplies for their 7 year old granddaughter and son " Ok , pencils. Which type? Wow these are $4.99 a pack and you and need 4 packs ? *under breath and eye-roll* geez she's 7"

 *insert small vent*  I used to sometimes think the teacher went and looked at the sale prices and specifically and exactly described only items that were still full price the first weeks of school.   100 page spiral notebooks are $1.68-$2.68 , 70 page are 9-19 cents I've been buying school supplies for 14 years the 70 page ones are always almost free the 100 page are always full price. When you ask for 6 in different colors that's a difference of 6-12 dollars.  24 crayons 10 cents the 12 you asked for 2.49 , again every year same price ratio and so it went for all 20 or so items.   The first year I followed the list exactly I don't know why you asked for 12 crayons maybe 24 is just too many choices for 6 year olds maybe they kids with 24 crayons are mean to the kids with 12 I assumed you had a reason to specifically request the most expensive option. That's not to mention the 10 red , green and black pens of which I still have 9 red and 9 green (years after the first time red and green implements were requested) and he never once filled the entire 70 page notebook when you insisted on 100 pages.  Teachers please take the extra moments to say "6 colors suggested/exactly 6 colors must include green and yellow" or "crayons minimum 12 colors/exactly 12 colors" or suggest your school adds it to the downloadable supply lists.   

blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23103 on: August 26, 2013, 06:07:07 PM »
Jerry Seinfeld had a rant about why he felt justified leaving his trash behind in the theater...he paid $7.50 (it's an old routine :-) ) for his ticket, the theater was making enough money, let them clean it up.

Except of course he wasn't hurting the theater owner one tiny bit, just adding one more little bit of aggravation to the lives of the minimum wage employees who have to clean up after his lazy, entitled millionaire butt.

If I drop the stuff, by mistake, then yeah, that is what the employees are paid for, though I feel pretty crummy that I've made their jobs harder. If I throw the stuff on the floor, or even LEAVE it there intentionally, I'm jist being a jerk.

Rob

I don't see how leaving an empty popcorn bag on the floor of a theatre is making someone's job harder.  Their job is to clean up.  I could see how stepping on popcorn and grinding it into the carpet, or spilling soda, or leaving it wedged in your seat, could be an issue.  In fact, if everyone took their trash with them and was perfectly clean, there would be people losing their jobs because there would be nothing to clean up.

Retail worker here. Actually, no. We wouldn't.

If you didn't leave trash around, we would be able to do other, more pleasant things. We would have more money - the company wouldn't spend half as much money on cleaning supplies or damaged stock, resulting in higher raises and bonuses (I think we lost close to a million dollars in shoplifting/customer damage last year in our store alone. And that comes out of OUR bonus, not the bosses). Since we would be doing more technical things, we would have more training and have a much better-looking resume if we wanted to go elsewhere.

And most important, I would never again reach into the back of a shelf and put my hand in someone's half-chewed leftover lunch. :( I'd be really happy with that!
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23104 on: August 26, 2013, 06:28:01 PM »
Good grief, d_d!  That makes me stabby.

I'm old enough to remember when kids were given everything, school supply-wise.  That included pens, pencils, and a fresh new pack of crayons.  (Honestly, was there anything more wonderful than brand-new Crayola crayons, with the points all pointy and the paper un-ripped?  Siiiigh.)  But yeah, that hasn't been the case in my hometown for decades. 

I remember one year when our daughter's list included playing cards and dice.  I joked that the teacher must be planning to teach them how to gamble.

They are given everything in the elementary school in our neighborhood.   Not all elementary schools in our county do it, but because the area is full of students below the poverty level, they provide school supplies for free to all students as well as a free breakfast.  Once the kids get to middle school though, the families have to start buying supplies.
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Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23105 on: August 26, 2013, 06:39:36 PM »
I went with my SIL to pick up the kids from school today. As we were picking up the kids  a father walks into my niece's room and says "What's this list all about, public school is supposed to be free. IF you want my kid to have this stuff --you blanket-blank pay for it!" Slammed the school supply list on the desk and walked out.
 
  Honestly, we spent less than $10 for the entire list buying on sales, the list is not that onerous - and if you can't afford it, you can go to one of the food kitchens show them that you can't and get free stuff.

Where has he been for the last, oh, 20 years or so?
I seem to remember that the schools in California DID supply everything in the 1960's.  I might be wrong, though.  When you are 6, stuff just appears.  You never see Mom buying it.  (Probably because you are too busy agitating for a box of AlphaBits and/or a ride on the mechanical horse.)
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Tierrainney

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23106 on: August 26, 2013, 06:46:00 PM »
I went with my SIL to pick up the kids from school today. As we were picking up the kids  a father walks into my niece's room and says "What's this list all about, public school is supposed to be free. IF you want my kid to have this stuff --you blanket-blank pay for it!" Slammed the school supply list on the desk and walked out.
 
  Honestly, we spent less than $10 for the entire list buying on sales, the list is not that onerous - and if you can't afford it, you can go to one of the food kitchens show them that you can't and get free stuff.

Where has he been for the last, oh, 20 years or so?
I seem to remember that the schools in California DID supply everything in the 1960's.  I might be wrong, though.  When you are 6, stuff just appears.  You never see Mom buying it.  (Probably because you are too busy agitating for a box of AlphaBits and/or a ride on the mechanical horse.)

Schools in California did supply almost everything you needed in Elementary school, at least through the end of the 1990s when no one in my family was in elementary school anymore. I grew up there and remember just getting a folder to bring stuff home because I didn't want it to get messed up. And later elementary buying pens with erasers because the school supplied one were just very plain ball points.

Middle school and up you did have to supply stuff, but you didn't get lists except maybe from the science teacher directly. Otherwise you just got what every pens, pencils, notebooks etc you wanted to use.

I have confirmed this memory with my Mother, because now I live in a state where you get a long list each year of specific school supplies to bring. The first year I had a child in Kindergarten I asked her as I wondered if I had just forgotten school lists.
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shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23107 on: August 26, 2013, 07:13:35 PM »
Jerry Seinfeld had a rant about why he felt justified leaving his trash behind in the theater...he paid $7.50 (it's an old routine :-) ) for his ticket, the theater was making enough money, let them clean it up.

Except of course he wasn't hurting the theater owner one tiny bit, just adding one more little bit of aggravation to the lives of the minimum wage employees who have to clean up after his lazy, entitled millionaire butt.

If I drop the stuff, by mistake, then yeah, that is what the employees are paid for, though I feel pretty crummy that I've made their jobs harder. If I throw the stuff on the floor, or even LEAVE it there intentionally, I'm jist being a jerk.

Rob

I don't see how leaving an empty popcorn bag on the floor of a theatre is making someone's job harder.  Their job is to clean up.  I could see how stepping on popcorn and grinding it into the carpet, or spilling soda, or leaving it wedged in your seat, could be an issue.  In fact, if everyone took their trash with them and was perfectly clean, there would be people losing their jobs because there would be nothing to clean up.

In case this wasn't sarcasm.  While I have never worked in a theater I can promise you with 100% certainty that I have never seen any business where employees jobs where in danger because customers threw out their trash. I can aslo say I have seen or experienced several dozen occasion where an employee was berated , chastises , written up ect. exactly because customers  did not throw their trash away. Everything from.........how did no one clean up these cigaret buts someone dumped in the parking lot - there are 3 tables with food trays still on them(while there was one cashier 5 people in line and the tables had emptied within the last 90 seconds).......what do you mean you had to stay after close for 10 minutes because there was a mess  , if  every go over hours again you;re fired .....someone left a MacDonald's bag in the back of the store. I sat there and times it it took 17 minutes for anyone to go back there and pick it up(in a furniture store with a 100 "rooms" and no clear line of visibility) same furniture store "there are two books on the sales floor set that are upside down (out of a possible 800 books minimum in any of the 100 rooms)
Trust me leaving a mess does not give the staff job security.

diesel_darlin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23108 on: August 26, 2013, 07:23:14 PM »
Shalamar, I really wondered if he would have been so keen on the idea if it had been his wife or daughter that happened to.

violinp

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23109 on: August 26, 2013, 08:10:21 PM »
Jerry Seinfeld had a rant about why he felt justified leaving his trash behind in the theater...he paid $7.50 (it's an old routine :-) ) for his ticket, the theater was making enough money, let them clean it up.

Except of course he wasn't hurting the theater owner one tiny bit, just adding one more little bit of aggravation to the lives of the minimum wage employees who have to clean up after his lazy, entitled millionaire butt.

If I drop the stuff, by mistake, then yeah, that is what the employees are paid for, though I feel pretty crummy that I've made their jobs harder. If I throw the stuff on the floor, or even LEAVE it there intentionally, I'm jist being a jerk.

Rob

I don't see how leaving an empty popcorn bag on the floor of a theatre is making someone's job harder.  Their job is to clean up.  I could see how stepping on popcorn and grinding it into the carpet, or spilling soda, or leaving it wedged in your seat, could be an issue.  In fact, if everyone took their trash with them and was perfectly clean, there would be people losing their jobs because there would be nothing to clean up.

Or I could be busy making sure that people aren't sneaking into theaters or being rude, that the projectors are running the right way, that the bathrooms are clean, that the tile slick with butter is being mopped, and that the trash bags are put into the dumpster and replaced (I or my coworker did all of that last night). I sure wouldn't lose a job if people picked up their drinks and bags and put them in the trash can the ushers put out for their convenience, but it would help me to do it faster and more efficiently.

I promise, when there's a rush to get 10 auditoriums clean in 30 minutes, it makes it infinitely easier if people try the best they can to keep their area clean. I don't expect spotless floors, because popcorn can go everywhere, but not walking (general) your concessions out to the trash can just because I can do it for (general) you is, frankly, entitled and really Special Snowflake.
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snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23110 on: August 26, 2013, 08:14:21 PM »
I went with my SIL to pick up the kids from school today. As we were picking up the kids  a father walks into my niece's room and says "What's this list all about, public school is supposed to be free. IF you want my kid to have this stuff --you blanket-blank pay for it!" Slammed the school supply list on the desk and walked out.
 
  Honestly, we spent less than $10 for the entire list buying on sales, the list is not that onerous - and if you can't afford it, you can go to one of the food kitchens show them that you can't and get free stuff.

Where has he been for the last, oh, 20 years or so?
I seem to remember that the schools in California DID supply everything in the 1960's.  I might be wrong, though.  When you are 6, stuff just appears.  You never see Mom buying it.  (Probably because you are too busy agitating for a box of AlphaBits and/or a ride on the mechanical horse.)

Schools in California did supply almost everything you needed in Elementary school, at least through the end of the 1990s when no one in my family was in elementary school anymore. I grew up there and remember just getting a folder to bring stuff home because I didn't want it to get messed up. And later elementary buying pens with erasers because the school supplied one were just very plain ball points.

Middle school and up you did have to supply stuff, but you didn't get lists except maybe from the science teacher directly. Otherwise you just got what every pens, pencils, notebooks etc you wanted to use.

I have confirmed this memory with my Mother, because now I live in a state where you get a long list each year of specific school supplies to bring. The first year I had a child in Kindergarten I asked her as I wondered if I had just forgotten school lists.

  The school districts I am familiar with have never given out supplies like  that we always had lists and being able to pick out our folders and supplies at the store was one of the best things "ever". 

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23111 on: August 26, 2013, 08:18:30 PM »
A number of churches that I'm familiar with (I know of at least 3) have been collecting loaded backpacks for kids in poorer school districts.  You pick up a backpack from the church (not sure if you buy it from them or if they pay for them out of church funds) and then you load it up with school supplies from a list, and return it to the church.  They deliver hundreds of backpacks to various districts that need them.  So presumably those districts don't provide the supplies themselves and require the students to get them, but not all the students can afford to.

What I don't like is when parents are expected to foot the bill for the school supplies, but the supplies are then tossed into a communal pot and then the kids all share everything.  The crayons seem to get damaged a lot faster when they're "everybody's" property instead of one kid taking care of them.  And the so-carefully chosen favorite color of schoolbox or erasers gets lost and the girl ends up with a black schoolbox instead of the purple one she chose.

snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23112 on: August 26, 2013, 08:22:42 PM »
A number of churches that I'm familiar with (I know of at least 3) have been collecting loaded backpacks for kids in poorer school districts.  You pick up a backpack from the church (not sure if you buy it from them or if they pay for them out of church funds) and then you load it up with school supplies from a list, and return it to the church.  They deliver hundreds of backpacks to various districts that need them.  So presumably those districts don't provide the supplies themselves and require the students to get them, but not all the students can afford to.

What I don't like is when parents are expected to foot the bill for the school supplies, but the supplies are then tossed into a communal pot and then the kids all share everything.  The crayons seem to get damaged a lot faster when they're "everybody's" property instead of one kid taking care of them.  And the so-carefully chosen favorite color of schoolbox or erasers gets lost and the girl ends up with a black schoolbox instead of the purple one she chose.

  That drives me wild.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23113 on: August 26, 2013, 08:24:18 PM »
A number of churches that I'm familiar with (I know of at least 3) have been collecting loaded backpacks for kids in poorer school districts.  You pick up a backpack from the church (not sure if you buy it from them or if they pay for them out of church funds) and then you load it up with school supplies from a list, and return it to the church.  They deliver hundreds of backpacks to various districts that need them.  So presumably those districts don't provide the supplies themselves and require the students to get them, but not all the students can afford to.


Our church (and others in our area) contribute to a program called "Micah's Backpacks".  Food is collected and put into bags which are then brought to the school and on Fridays these bags are given to students who might not have enough food to get them through the weekend.  Not school supplies, but it does help. :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23114 on: August 26, 2013, 08:30:27 PM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

I certainly understand getting frustrated with the sheer amount of stuff parents have to buy.  School supplies for two kids ran me almost $200, counting sturdy backpacks.  I had to buy the usual notebooks, paper, giant packs of pencils and pens, but I also had to buy plastic gallon bags, tissue, paper plates, paper cups, hand sanitizer, and dry erase markers for the classroom whiteboard. The amount of stuff that parents are expected to provide for classroom wide use is getting ridiculous. 


But I certainly don't condone the way the dad behaved
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 08:32:45 PM by weeblewobble »