Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5770368 times)

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alkira6

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23145 on: August 27, 2013, 01:29:24 PM »
I have a very basic list of supplies and even then I get the SS parents who will NOT get the supplies.  2 70 page notebooks (.17 each), 2 pencils (10pack .50), 2 pens (10 pack .97), folder with prongs (.10 each).  I supply markers, color pencils, hand sanitizer, paper towel, copy paper, dry erase markers, extra paper, and so on.  There have been years where I get to itemize my taxes for the couple thousand that I spend on supplies. 

SS parent this year - child comes in every day with a bag of hot chips, a bottle of soda, a subway sandwich, and a few dollars for the afterschool concession stand.  I have spoken with the parents only to get the excuse that they cannot afford supplies.  How about you skip subway or the junk food one day and get your kid some paper and pencils?

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23146 on: August 27, 2013, 01:43:06 PM »
Quote
She responded "Didn't hurt nothin'? That's my front yard and I try to keep it looking decent, and why couldn't he just back into the drive from the street?"
Tell your friend about the advantage of landscaping with large rocks.  Our property is at the end of a now dead-end road.  We had a constant problem of people chewing up the corner of our yard by making a U-turn, instead of pulling a bit into the driveway and making a 3-point turn.  I swapped a bottle of cinnamon-orange cordial for a rock about 2 1/2 - 3 feet around by 1 foot high.  We had the gentleman delivering it drop it in the corner of the yard where the most damage occurred.  It's too heavy to move by hand, and just large enough that if someone tries to drive over it, he will have severe undercarriage damage.  >:D   And it's spray-painted bright white, so there is no reason that someone wouldn't see it.

Well this is the only time it's happened, and she doesn't see this vehicle around often now, but I might suggest to her that it could be worth looking into.  The truck left an 11' track in her front yard. I suggested she take a picture of it for proof and snap a pic of the license in case these yahoos do show up again.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Yarnspinner

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23147 on: August 27, 2013, 05:41:44 PM »
May I nominate a four footed candidate who got smacked by some furry karma recently?  TeaCup Doggie is not quite two years old, spoiled rotten and suffers from the notion that a) she is a Rotweiler and b) Master of All She Surveys.  She lives with two other dogs who are both used to deferring to her, even though they have been part of the household longer and are bigger than she is. 

Enter Rescue Puppy.  Rescue Puppy is six or seven months old three times the size of TeaCup and desperate to play.  There are toys all over the house and nearly all of them are toys that TeaCup is not interested in AT ALL.  Until now.  Rescue Puppy cannot pick up a toy, look at a toy Or breath near a toy without TeaCup getting all in her face, barking and screaming and carrying on. 

As soon as Rescue Puppy drops the toy in question, Teacup picks it up, heads into the dining room and sticks in underneath the credenza where she can fit but Rescue Puppy cannot.  Then she goes out to see what else she can take from Rescue Puppy. 

It doesn't matter if she has three nylon bones included in her little Smaug-like hoard...if Rescue Puppy has one, Teacup must have it, too.  (I spent most of my time sitting them taking all the toys away and hiding them.  One morning I piled all the toys up on the ledge in the kitchen and came back to find TeaCup nudging her cage toward the window to see if she could climb on top to get at them.

One of the other dogs is a homely little mutt who has the sweet soul of a poet.  He's a big hug in fur and loves to snuggle.  EVERYONE loves him and no one ever hears him bark.  He had been snuggling with me one afternoon when "the girls" got into a fight over a rope toy. 

TeaCup had decided that two rope toys weren't enough.  She needed three and she wasn't going to rest until she had the one that Rescue had.  Nothing any of us did could shut them up.  I was getting upset because I couldn't even grab them (and I had had to get up and leave Snugglepuss to fend for himself.

Suddenly Snugglepuss marches into the middle of the conflict, looks from Teacup to Rescue and back and let out what can only be called a Super Atomaic BARK!  (Think "Bolt")

Both girls were so shocked they both dropped the toy.  Snugglepuss picked it up, toddled off upstairs with it where, I guess he hid it, then he came back downstairs, climbed back into his spot on the sofa and sat there looking at me as if to say "Well, come on, the movie is still going and my ears need scratching."

TeaCup and Rescue were staring at each other as if to say "What the heck just happened?"

Snugglepuss got extra biscuits for rescuing me.

TeamBhakta

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23148 on: August 27, 2013, 05:44:24 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html

Jones

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23149 on: August 27, 2013, 05:54:18 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23150 on: August 27, 2013, 05:59:15 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

Did you read some of the comments?  Wow.
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23151 on: August 27, 2013, 06:02:25 PM »
I can say that some of the comments made my day.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23152 on: August 27, 2013, 06:49:57 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
Quote
There was a time when I didn't know enough about my students and that bit me in the butt when I made the grave mistake of using too much sarcasm in the classroom and one of my students had struggled with Autism. She wasn't able to read social clues and know when I was being literal and concrete or sarcastic and abstract. Her mother came in to tell me halfway through the school year, and I wish I had known right away so that I wouldn't have used so much sarcasm in the classroom.
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.
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squeakers

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23153 on: August 27, 2013, 06:58:30 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html

We actually get questionnaires from the teachers asking those very questions.  It helps the teacher know that Brad is shy but smart, Torie likes math but hates reading and that Harry just lost his favorite uncle so might be on the sad/quiet side.
"I feel sarcasm is the lowest form of wit." "It is so low, in fact, that Miss Manners feels sure you would not want to resort to it yourself, even in your own defense. We do not believe in retaliatory rudeness." Judith Martin

poundcake

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23154 on: August 27, 2013, 07:13:59 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

That article, and its grammatical problems, made me stabby. Shut up, Snowflake Mom, and let the teachers teach.

Black Delphinium

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23155 on: August 27, 2013, 07:22:25 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

That article, and its grammatical problems, made me stabby. Shut up, Snowflake Mom, and let the teachers teach.
And she claims to have taught English, that's what kills me.
When angels go bad, they go worse than anyone. Remember, Lucifer was an angel. ~The Marquis De Carabas

lilfox

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23156 on: August 27, 2013, 07:45:24 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."

This exchange left me baffled at age 11 because I couldn't figure out why Venkman thought nobody could manage to stack books in a tower.

I would say these days kids might recognize sarcasm at a younger age because it's far more prevalent in pop culture, but they still can't really comprehend it or process it accurately.  Like knowing that someone told a joke but not really understanding why it's funny.

About the article, my dd's preschool sent home a parent survey asking the first four questions plus some other related ones.  Maybe this would be fine for older kids, but how does one define a typical 3-yr old's strengths or weaknesses in any way that makes her unique from most other kids her age?  Or hobbies?  She's 3, she likes picking up rocks. (Dang, I should have put that!)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23157 on: August 27, 2013, 07:50:23 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."

This exchange left me baffled at age 11 because I couldn't figure out why Venkman thought nobody could manage to stack books in a tower.

I would say these days kids might recognize sarcasm at a younger age because it's far more prevalent in pop culture, but they still can't really comprehend it or process it accurately.  Like knowing that someone told a joke but not really understanding why it's funny.

About the article, my dd's preschool sent home a parent survey asking the first four questions plus some other related ones.  Maybe this would be fine for older kids, but how does one define a typical 3-yr old's strengths or weaknesses in any way that makes her unique from most other kids her age?  Or hobbies?  She's 3, she likes picking up rocks. (Dang, I should have put that!)
That's like that show Toddlers me Tiaras when they talk about babies likes, dislikes and ambitions.

I was very pleased that one episode where the boy beat all the girls!

RooRoo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23158 on: August 27, 2013, 08:10:37 PM »
Actually, I kind of like #2. That is because, when my mother was working in a university's reading & study skills help department, she came across a student who was getting lousy grades; Ds and Fs. He didn't really deserve them, because he was brilliant, and knew his subjects - but his profs couldn't read what he wrote. Awful handwriting, and terrible spelling.

My mom, in spite of lacking credentials, had an instinct for detecting learning disabilities just from reading the students' papers. She suspected dyslexia and sent him for that testing.

Not only did he have dyslexia, but it was profound. It was stunning that he had even graduated from high school, let alone gotten Ds in college.

PCs weren't around then. She did get his profs to let him type all his papers, and to forgive his spelling. Yeah, she went above and beyond for him. He became a family friend. He has had to fight all his life against prejudices against him because he can't spell.  :'( >:(
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Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23159 on: August 27, 2013, 08:25:17 PM »


 Agreed. But alternative is the teachers spend thousands to buy all this for all the  kids in their classes, that does not seem reasonable either. And I think there should be better ways to handle it than tax increases.  There are so many grants and programs ( I spent 5 years researching these for a friend ) that schools could use it's not funny.

But are there enough grants to provide for every school? I would doubt that. And I am not familiar with any grants that agree to provide for a program ad infinitum. Many grant applications now require the grantees to specify in the application how they plan to fund the program after the grant expires. Apparently funding sources are tired of funding the start-ups of promising programs, only to have them collapse when the grantor stops funding them.