Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5077535 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23295 on: September 06, 2013, 08:49:24 AM »
From today's dear abby - first letter. Not quite sure if she's an SS or not, but her attitude is, at least to me!

http://www.uexpress.com/dearabby/

Basically, a woman berating "older" workers for hanging onto their jobs, to support their lavish lifestyles, and preventing younger workers from advancing, and even being laid off. she then goes on to say that when HER kids are out of college, she plans to take a less-stressful, lower paying job so that a young person can have HER job to support their family.

DA basically told her, try and be less judgmental, as many "older" folks are not working to support their luxeries, but simply to survive.  Is it wrong of me to hope that karma bites her, and she too needs to continue working longer to simply survive?????

I have a best friend and aunt-in-law who have both said they aren't sure if they'll ever be able to retire, and one's closing in on 60, the other isn't quite 50 yet.  Neither of them are living lavishly, just trying to make ends meet.   One is single so it's not like she can depend on a husband's income, and in the case of AIL, she and UIL are both working hard to try and make ends meet and my friend is talking about trying to at least go part time but she doesn't think she'll be able to stop working. 

So both would be SOL if someone pushed them out of their jobs due to their age.

I'm 47, and single, with TWO jobs. Some of it is my fault, due to spending and cc debt, but I can't see myself retiring anytime before the age of 67, or later. UGH. I do have retirement savings, but not a whole lot, as I've never made the big bucks. and who knows whether or not social security will even be an option when I'm ready to retire, or how much it might be, IF still around.  I don't have another income to fall back on (i.e. husband or SO). My immediate goal is to be able to quite my second job sometime next spring, and be out of debt, or almost so, by age 50.

My cousin and I were joking yesterday about this, since i sent her the link as well. She's several years older, and we said while we can live NEXT DOOR to each other, not in the same house. and were discussing where we would live.  She has siblings, but isn't maried either, so it may just be me and her!

RebeccainGA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23296 on: September 06, 2013, 08:59:30 AM »
SS school bus driver in my neighborhood. Every morning since school has started, if I'm not lucky enough to miss it, this bus stops at the house of one of our neighbors. We have one road in and out of our neighborhood, with side streets branching off, but this house is on the main road, so the school bus with its red stop sign out stops all traffic in and out of the neighborhood (and the house is near the entrance, so it's ALL traffic). The student, a young-ish kid (probably elementary age) gets on the bus, alone, and then the mom comes out, talks to the driver for a good five-ten minutes every morning, and then the bus driver goes to the back of the bus (or at least farther back than the drivers seat, it's hard to tell from outside) and does something for another five minutes. THEN we can all go.

There was a parade of at least ten cars behind the bus trying to get into the neighborhood, and another fifteen or twenty vehicles (including two other school buses) trying to leave the neighborhood this morning. I can think of nothing that would require fifteen minutes to get a child not in a wheelchair (which can take some time) into a bus seat every single morning. I think the bus driver and the kid's mom are just friendly.

z_squared82

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23297 on: September 06, 2013, 09:32:32 AM »
SS school bus driver in my neighborhood. Every morning since school has started, if I'm not lucky enough to miss it, this bus stops at the house of one of our neighbors. We have one road in and out of our neighborhood, with side streets branching off, but this house is on the main road, so the school bus with its red stop sign out stops all traffic in and out of the neighborhood (and the house is near the entrance, so it's ALL traffic). The student, a young-ish kid (probably elementary age) gets on the bus, alone, and then the mom comes out, talks to the driver for a good five-ten minutes every morning, and then the bus driver goes to the back of the bus (or at least farther back than the drivers seat, it's hard to tell from outside) and does something for another five minutes. THEN we can all go.

There was a parade of at least ten cars behind the bus trying to get into the neighborhood, and another fifteen or twenty vehicles (including two other school buses) trying to leave the neighborhood this morning. I can think of nothing that would require fifteen minutes to get a child not in a wheelchair (which can take some time) into a bus seat every single morning. I think the bus driver and the kid's mom are just friendly.

This happening more than once would result in a call to the bus company from me.

Another SS bus driver would pull something similar everyday near my cousin’s house. On a road that was three cars wide with parking on just one side, a smaller bus (used to pick up elderly and handicapped people for adult day care) would park in the middle of the two lanes that were left to pick up and drop off someone in a wheelchair, thus blocking the traffic in both directions. Cousin called the bus company after she got stuck behind it a couple of times. The bus driver started pulling over so people could get around.

unnalee

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23298 on: September 06, 2013, 10:13:39 AM »
Another SS bus driver:

Before we moved into town, my morning commute was through some pretty rural area.  We tried to time our carpool so that we could avoid following the school bus as he picked up the kids.  Sometimes we weren't so lucky.

At one house, there were 4 kids.  They were NEVER ready when the bus got there (SS family in their own right).  They'd trickle out one at a time, and the driver would just sit there at the intersection and wait for them, once for almost 10 minutes!  All the while, the red lights on the bus were flashing and the stop sign was out, so anyone turning off the main highway couldn't turn down the country road, and anyone (like us) trying to turn off the county road to get onto the highway was stuck too.  After this happened twice, a few of us called the bus company and the school district.  The policy was that the bus wasn't supposed to wait for more than 3 minutes at any house.  They were well aware of the problem, as it was making the kids on this particular route late for school.

The next time the kids weren't ready when the bus came, my car was directly behind it.  As he waited for the kids, the driver stuck his arm out of the window to wave us to go around the bus.  But he kept the red flashers on and the stop sign out!  Here, it's VERY ILLEGAL to go around a bus when the red flashers are on, resulting in huge fines and points on your license. 

You could tell he was getting mad at us for not going around, because his arm motions were getting more forceful.  My passenger calmly got out of the car, walked up to the window and told the driver that we weren't about to break the law, just because he waved us around.  Driver sheepishly realized the problem, and from then on started to pull off the road when the kids weren't ready to go.

We reported these antics too, and thankfully, the driver isn't employed there anymore.

LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23299 on: September 06, 2013, 10:55:03 AM »
A few years ago I was waiting outside the elementary school, waiting for my sons, when I heard one guy griping about Justin Bieber and the (redacted) Canadians and other immigrants coming in to take jobs away from Americans.

Mind you, this guy had told me that he was first generation Irish-American and while I didn't say anything, I couldn't help but wonder if this guy knew about the "No Irish Need Apply" signs that were up around the time my ancestors came over from Eire.

Every time I hear people talking like that it reminds me of this: http://xkcd.com/84/
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23300 on: September 06, 2013, 12:04:36 PM »
While I was visiting my younger sister, she took me to a party at a friend’s house.  Also in attendance were a pregnant couple and their 6-year-old Pwecious Pwincess (the only child at the party).  The couple was convinced that Pwecious was the most amazing child ever born, and they encouraged her to make herself the center of attention. She was actually a very obnoxious child.

Pwecious was explaining to everyone that she didn’t want a baby sister.  I pointed to my sister and said that having a sister was one of the best things in my life.  I jokingly added, “And having a younger sister means you can make her do things for you”. 

The couple went ballistic.  They screamed at me for saying such a terrible thing.  At one point, they actually stated that they’d have to take the child to a therapist to straighten her out. 
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23301 on: September 06, 2013, 12:24:31 PM »
...    I jokingly added, “And having a younger sister means you can make her do things for you”. 

The couple went ballistic.  They screamed at me for saying such a terrible thing.  At one point, they actually stated that they’d have to take the child to a therapist to straighten her out.

That bolded part might be prophetic indeed, but it wouldn't be because of what you said.   :)

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23302 on: September 06, 2013, 12:30:42 PM »
Seconded!

And on a related note, it drives me nuts when people allow kids to attend a party that's meant only for adults.   My mother remembers going to a late-night party at her boss's house, and her boss's then-4-year-old son was riding his tricycle throughout the house (!), running into people, knocking things over, and generally being a nuisance.  The boss's wife was absolutely useless - she just kept saying plaintively "Sweetie, don't you want to go to bed?"  Of course, the answer from the brat was "No!", and that was apparently the end of the discussion.   ???

DollyPond

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23303 on: September 06, 2013, 12:49:51 PM »
Seconded!

And on a related note, it drives me nuts when people allow kids to attend a party that's meant only for adults.   My mother remembers going to a late-night party at her boss's house, and her boss's then-4-year-old son was riding his tricycle throughout the house (!), running into people, knocking things over, and generally being a nuisance.  The boss's wife was absolutely useless - she just kept saying plaintively "Sweetie, don't you want to go to bed?"  Of course, the answer from the brat was "No!", and that was apparently the end of the discussion.   ???

And then there was the case I experienced of a couple who BROUGHT their kid to an all adult dinner party because "We don't believe in babysitters".  This kid was hyperactive and crawling all over the floors under the tables, etc. The couple thought this was ever so prescious! 

Funny how they were never invited to another all adult dinner party again.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23304 on: September 06, 2013, 12:59:56 PM »
Seconded!

And on a related note, it drives me nuts when people allow kids to attend a party that's meant only for adults.   My mother remembers going to a late-night party at her boss's house, and her boss's then-4-year-old son was riding his tricycle throughout the house (!), running into people, knocking things over, and generally being a nuisance.  The boss's wife was absolutely useless - she just kept saying plaintively "Sweetie, don't you want to go to bed?"  Of course, the answer from the brat was "No!", and that was apparently the end of the discussion.   ???

Ugh, that's one of my pet peeves, when parents ask children that young if they want to do something they need to do.  When visiting my cousin about 2 years ago, the wife, daughter and I were getting ready to go to the beach on our last day visiting them.   The weather had been rather warm for a January weekend (50's) and being a beach lover I wanted to get in one more visit before we left. (cousins live about 5 minutes from the Jersey shore)

DH was eager to get on the road cause it's a long drive home and the wife kept saying to her 3 year old daughter. "Do you want to go potty now?" "Why don't we go potty now?"  I wanted to scoop up the child, carry her to the toilet and say "here, I know you don't think you need to go but let's sit and try anyway."   

The mother is always like this with both of their kids.  There's no "We're going to do this!" It's always "Do you want to?" And if the answer is no, she waits till the answer is yes.  ::)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23305 on: September 06, 2013, 01:03:56 PM »
My SIL always gave my nephews a choice - but it was between two options.  'Do you want to go to bed in 3 minutes or 5 minutes?'  Of course, they always chose 5.

I would have just said, 'Time for bed!' but she'd read some parenting book that says you need to give kids a choice so they feel empowered or something like that.

Now at 21 and almost 19 (and their mother pretty much out of their lives for the last year and a half), they are both pretty good kids so maybe it worked.  And it wasn't just a load of hogwash, like I was thinking it was.   :D
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suzieQ

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23306 on: September 06, 2013, 01:12:02 PM »
I hear a lot of people talking to kids using a statement, like "It's time to go to bed now," but they end it with "ok?"
I much prefer "It's time to go to bed now." It's not a question and they don't get a choice.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23307 on: September 06, 2013, 01:15:57 PM »
Ugh, that's one of my pet peeves, when parents ask children that young if they want to do something they need to do.  When visiting my cousin about 2 years ago, the wife, daughter and I were getting ready to go to the beach on our last day visiting them.   The weather had been rather warm for a January weekend (50's) and being a beach lover I wanted to get in one more visit before we left. (cousins live about 5 minutes from the Jersey shore)

   

The mother is always like this with both of their kids.  There's no "We're going to do this!" It's always "Do you want to?" And if the answer is no, she waits till the answer is yes.  ::)

I will climb up on my soapbox and say, and I'm generalizing and giving MY opinion - this is why there are so many ill-behaved children. I was never asked; I was told it's now bedtime, let's go, or, told to my whatever it was away I was doing, or it's dinner time, turn the tv off NOW and come to the table. And if I didn't comply, there were consequences.

 it's a pet peeve of mine as well. I saw something a number of years ago, on 20/20 or something like that, about unruly kids, and how to deal wiht them.  one thing that stuck out ws you shouldn't give them too many options, and showed a small child, maybe 4 or 5, who was resistent to teeth brushing.

He had something like 10 different toothbrushes, and half the battle was choosing which one to use. They said don't give them that many choices, one, and that's what you use, and that's that.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23308 on: September 06, 2013, 01:22:44 PM »
My SIL always gave my nephews a choice - but it was between two options.  'Do you want to go to bed in 3 minutes or 5 minutes?'  Of course, they always chose 5.

I would have just said, 'Time for bed!' but she'd read some parenting book that says you need to give kids a choice so they feel empowered or something like that.

Now at 21 and almost 19 (and their mother pretty much out of their lives for the last year and a half), they are both pretty good kids so maybe it worked.  And it wasn't just a load of hogwash, like I was thinking it was.   :D

The advantage of the "choice" method is that young children don't multi-task very well.  If they're focused on trying to choose between two options - even if it's an obvious choice, like wanting to stay up an extra two minutes - they're much less likely to have a screaming fit over the fact that they're going to bed at all.  If you scoop them up and say "time for bed," they've got plenty of energy to focus on how much they don't want to be doing whatever you're trying to get them to do.  As a bonus, it also gets them used to making decisions, so when they're a bit older you can tell them "pick up the living room" or "go get dressed for school" and they're less likely to stand there for ten minutes wondering what toy to pick up first or what shirt to wear . . .

lilfox

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23309 on: September 06, 2013, 01:29:53 PM »
Some of the parenting examples just given don't qualify for SS, in my book.

SS parenting is letting the child set the entire agenda, like riding his tricycle into guests and being destructive/violent because you can't say No to "Precious Darling."

OTOH, it's a completely valid parenting approach to offer small children (limited) choices and some (again limited) amount of control over their activities.  You (general) may not like hearing it or find it annoying, but sometimes it is the best way to avoid a fit over going to the potty or to bed or whatever.

And I know I've mentioned before, but some people add "okay?" to the end of a request as verbal short-hand for "do you hear and understand me" not "are you okay with this and if not that's fine too."