Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5737123 times)

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VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23535 on: September 15, 2013, 12:58:10 PM »
Scene this morning: white van in left-only turn lane.  Us in the middle lane.  Right turn lane. 
We have a red light.  Left lane gets a green arrow to turn left, as does oncoming left lane.  Does the white van turn left?  NO. He flips on his blinker and turns RIGHT, crossing in front of us and almost creaming another car that is making a legal left turn.  ::)  There's an awful lot of times that I wish I was a cop in an unmarked car, and this was one of them.

Or else armed with photon torpedoes. 


Snarky likes photon torpedoes.  Evil prefers to break the molecular bonds in the matter of the vehicle - so that the SS makes the turn....with their vehicle turning to a cloud of disassociated atoms around them - sadly, the device keeps failing in her trials.  She claims that she just wants to see their faces when the turn doesn't work for them and the vehicle gets in the way...
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23536 on: September 15, 2013, 04:15:32 PM »
The SS client of my realtor BIL is quite upset now.  He has told her that a colleague will be assisting he from now on. She is irate that he doesn't doesn't want to help her and that he didn't cancel his pre-planned vacation for the remainder of the week. He just kept repeating that it's not possible for him to work with her and is no longer taking any of her calls.

Please tell me his superiors understand why he did not return her calls during what I assume to be his father's funeral?  (Even if it was his FIL's funeral, he should be supporting his wife as she mourns HER father, not worrying about the client's so-outside-of-his-scope-its-ridiculous demands.)

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23537 on: September 15, 2013, 04:22:29 PM »
Re: Children and inappropriate movies

When I was six, I went to a sleepover at a friend's house once and after we went to bed, the parents and older sister started watching one of the Howling movies. I needed a drink of water and walked out into the living room to ask for one just as a woman was shown on screen with (whited out for mention of slight gore) blood dripping from her mouth, down her throat.

I shrieked and the parents immediately turned the movie off, explaining that the poor woman in the movie had just taken a big bite of a hot dog and ketchup ran down her face and neck.  Wasn't that terrible?

I didn't quite believe it, but I grasped onto that explanation for all it was worth because it was less scary than the bloody alternative. Years later, I appreciate the fact that the parents and sister tried to give me some other image to put in my head, rather than scary werewolves.  And they didn't make me feel bad for being scared.

weeblewobble

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23538 on: September 15, 2013, 04:25:35 PM »
I remember a while back hearing some sort of child-rearing approach of never teaching a child the word "no".  Instead of "No, you can't have that!" say "That's for another time." or "Why don't we have this instead!"

Instead of "No hitting!",  "Hitting isn't very nice!" I'm not real sure what the big issue is with a child hearing the word "No", I think it was the thought that hearing "No" will "break their spirit."  ::)

I have no problem saying "No" to my boys, especially since a good loud "NO!" can shock a small one into listening a lot faster than trying to rephrase it, especially if you need them to stop right away.

Whaaa-?  :o

What an absolute bucket of smelly old fish!

Did they take that from Battle for Planet of the Apes or something?

Beats me! Come to think of it, I do remember someone saying they thought it would cut down on toddlers saying "No" to everything.  As in, if they don't hear it, they won't use it and one won't have to hear "NONONONONONOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" when it's announced that it's naptime, bathtime or bedtime. 

Meanwhile I'm over here thinking "What about the times when a small child might need to use the word "No"?

Honestly.  My kids are very familiar with the concept of "no."

The family joke was that my uncles grew up thinking that my dad's name was "NoBob." Because almost every time they heard his name, my grandparents were saying something like, "No, Bob, don't jump off the stair rail!"  or "No, Bob, don't hit your brother."

Hillia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23539 on: September 15, 2013, 04:38:13 PM »
Years ago, I was visiting some friends for a week.  One night, Mary and their two young sons had gone to bed, while John and I stayed up to watch the Bourne Identity on tv.  There's a scene in the movie where one character suddenly explodes into a violent attack and destroys a room.  The attack starts, the tv goes nuts with bright, flashing lights and loud noises.  In the midst of all this, we hear a shriek...their oldest son, age 4, had snuck out of bed and was hiding on the stairs watching the movie.  Fortunately, he didn't see anything inappropriate; it was just the sudden loud noise and lights had startled him.

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Nikko-chan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23540 on: September 15, 2013, 07:59:33 PM »
I have a special snowflake story... seems I have a lot of them lately.

So I was walking home from the store today, and as I walk home, I tend to use the sidewalks, and on the street at almost every intersection there is a crosswalk painted there. Special Snowflake driver was IN the crosswalk. I ended up having to walk around her car to cross the street, all because she doesn't know how to keep her car out of the crosswalk!

rain

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23541 on: September 15, 2013, 08:13:36 PM »
chiming in late about people not checking movie suitability for their kids- my oldest sister let her kids see the Nightmare before Christmas, then got upset because her youngest got ... nightmares  ::)

OS thought it'd be a cute movie not dark in anyway ( :o Sweet monkey fritters! - with nightmare in the title)


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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23542 on: September 15, 2013, 08:25:27 PM »
Even I was freaked out by the boogie man.

Library Dragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23543 on: September 15, 2013, 08:44:43 PM »
The SS client of my realtor BIL is quite upset now.  He has told her that a colleague will be assisting he from now on. She is irate that he doesn't doesn't want to help her and that he didn't cancel his pre-planned vacation for the remainder of the week. He just kept repeating that it's not possible for him to work with her and is no longer taking any of her calls.

Please tell me his superiors understand why he did not return her calls during what I assume to be his father's funeral?  (Even if it was his FIL's funeral, he should be supporting his wife as she mourns HER father, not worrying about the client's so-outside-of-his-scope-its-ridiculous demands.)

His father's funeral (my FIL).  Oh yes.  He superiors are very understanding.  If BIL refuses to work with someone it means the person is a whole blizzard.  He's generally the go-to guy for high end SSs for the firm.  Think reality show stars who think they actually accomplished something.

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LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23544 on: September 16, 2013, 11:26:22 AM »
I didn't quite believe it, but I grasped onto that explanation for all it was worth because it was less scary than the bloody alternative. Years later, I appreciate the fact that the parents and sister tried to give me some other image to put in my head, rather than scary werewolves.  And they didn't make me feel bad for being scared.

Oh lucky you!  My family loved to watch those awful old horror movies, and they'd laugh when I got scared from them.  Well, my father was quiet, my brothers laughed, and my mom was disdainful.

I hate all horror movies to this day.

Hillia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23545 on: September 16, 2013, 11:38:29 AM »
I introduced DS to the classic horror films (original Frankenstein, Wolfman, Dracula) when he was about 7.  I made a big deal out of it, popcorn, darkened room, the whole thing, and kind of joked through the scary parts while watching him carefully for his reaction.  He loved Dracula, and I heard 'I never drink...wine' and 'Children of the night! What sweet music they make!' for months afterward.

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Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23546 on: September 16, 2013, 11:53:04 AM »
My Dad let my friends and me watch the original Dracula when I was having a sleep-over.

Unfortunately, we were a little older than 7, and while the film did keep us intrigued, we did some mocking of the special effects. I'm sure a rubber bat bouncing on a string was cutting-edge special effects for the time, but we giggled ourselves silly imitating a boneless bat.

My father, quite rightly, considered us barbarians.
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Kariachi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23547 on: September 16, 2013, 12:25:59 PM »
My Dad let my friends and me watch the original Dracula when I was having a sleep-over.

Unfortunately, we were a little older than 7, and while the film did keep us intrigued, we did some mocking of the special effects. I'm sure a rubber bat bouncing on a string was cutting-edge special effects for the time, but we giggled ourselves silly imitating a boneless bat.

My father, quite rightly, considered us barbarians.

I took a course in Horror in Film in college. Every day we'd have a new film that we'd sit down and watch and we were instructed to take notes, both to have reference as to what happened and how it was done and to record our own reactions to the film. Some of them I was clearly freaked out and using the writing as an excuse not to look at the screen (Event Horizon), but the classic Dracula?

Yeah. My notes included things like "aww, the cricket has his own little coffin!" and "was that an armadillo?"
"Heh. Forgive our manners, little creature that we may well kill and eat you is no excuse for rudeness."

Doll Fiend

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23548 on: September 16, 2013, 06:08:54 PM »
Considering that the classic Dracula was released on St Valentines day and was billed as a romance, it does make me wonder at the minds of the people back then.

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23549 on: September 16, 2013, 06:33:57 PM »
Considering that the classic Dracula was released on St Valentines day and was billed as a romance, it does make me wonder at the minds of the people back then.

To continue on the derailing, well, the vampire biting humans was a symbol for scrabbling, IIRC.

Wish I had some snowflakey stories, but everyone at my university is just too nice! It's a great problem to have.


Vita brevis, ars longa