Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5053823 times)

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Jules1980

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23970 on: October 20, 2013, 05:32:06 PM »
I didn't quite believe it, but I grasped onto that explanation for all it was worth because it was less scary than the bloody alternative. Years later, I appreciate the fact that the parents and sister tried to give me some other image to put in my head, rather than scary werewolves.  And they didn't make me feel bad for being scared.

I watched Poltergeist with some older cousins and my older siblings when I was 5 or so.  Three of the older cousins were teens and when it looked like I was getting too scared, they'd make some silly crack about what was happening.  To this day, I laugh about that movie.  When the blood run down the walls, one cousin said it was red paint and it was easier to paint the walls by pouring it down from the ceiling.  When the little girl got sucked into the tv, they said that's why you never sit close to the tv.  ETC.  So, long story short, what could have been traumatizing to me turned into one of my favorite memories of them.

Poppea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23971 on: October 20, 2013, 06:22:04 PM »
Perhaps the blogger has a point...but I was always taught that it was poor manners to talk about having something someone else did not, or could not afford. To expect to be both admired for having things, and pitied for all the trouble having nice things causes, seems to me to be antithetical to the purposes of etiquette.

I think the blogger expressed herself poorly, but I remember clearly a girl in my dorm making nasty remarks about clothes I wore that were expensive.  "[b]How much did that cost?[/i][/b]" she sneered at me.  "Oh not that much" I replied.  "Really?  I think XX is a lot of money!![/b]".   I was raised to NEVER talk about things you owned or what things cost, so this was all on her.

My crime was wearing a new and expensive (to her) outfit to the cafeteria.  I declined to explain to her that I had paid for all my own clothes since high school.  It was none of her business.  She knew what my father was a doctor (I was premed at the time and had mentioned that I worked in his office over vacations) and therefore I was a spoilt little rich girl and should be made to feel badly.  I just thought she was a moron and wondered how she would ever be able to live a middle class life with that attitude. 
« Last Edit: October 20, 2013, 06:24:59 PM by Poppea »

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23972 on: October 20, 2013, 06:40:27 PM »
And honestly...who cares? Are peoples lives that uninteresting that they're upset with how they think people think about them? I wish I had that few problems.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23973 on: October 20, 2013, 07:20:37 PM »
And honestly...who cares? Are peoples lives that uninteresting that they're upset with how they think people think about them? I wish I had that few problems.

High school students everywhere would beg to differ.  It's nice to look back now and know I have the self-confidence that I don't care about the kind of things my peers said and did then, but it's a rare high school student who can truly not be bothered even a little bit.  The girl who wrote the article isn't that much older than high school, and I can completely understand assuming a dirty look is accompanied by judgemental thoughts - especially if you're often in situations where those judgemental thoughts are frequently expressed aloud.

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23974 on: October 20, 2013, 07:41:48 PM »
And honestly...who cares? Are peoples lives that uninteresting that they're upset with how they think people think about them? I wish I had that few problems.

High school students everywhere would beg to differ.  It's nice to look back now and know I have the self-confidence that I don't care about the kind of things my peers said and did then, but it's a rare high school student who can truly not be bothered even a little bit.  The girl who wrote the article isn't that much older than high school, and I can completely understand assuming a dirty look is accompanied by judgemental thoughts - especially if you're often in situations where those judgemental thoughts are frequently expressed aloud.

This. It's all part of growing up and becoming less self-centered. Teens are self-centered to a degree because they're figuring out their own identity, so they focus more on their own concerns rather than everyone else's.


"To study and practice the goodness of life, the beauty of art, the meaning of music...To speak the words that build, that bless and comfort...And again, to practice./This is to be our symphony."

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23975 on: October 20, 2013, 07:42:16 PM »
That's the best thing I think about leaving high school: once you're gone you realize how very little it matters.

goldilocks

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23976 on: October 20, 2013, 09:45:53 PM »
I was almost mistaken for a snowflake last night!

I went to the theatre to see a play with my family.  All adults except the 8 YO.   Now, we have been taking her to all types of events (theatre, movies, ballets) since she was 2, and have never had an issue.   She sits and watches the performance, doesn't get up, doesn't talk, just enjoys it.

there was some confusion over our seats, one of our seats was taken by someone else.  The lady was very apologetic and started to move, but I told her it was fine.  I said "That's okay, the baby is just going to sit in someone's lap, so we won't need that seat".

The woman in front of me swiveled around faster than the the girl in the Exorcist and said 'BABY??????!!!!!!"

I pointed to the 8 YO and said, yes, this is our baby.   She recovered and said "Oh, isnt she pretty".   Poor lady, I guess she thought we had an actual baby, and from reading this site, that isn't so far-fetched.

And we all enjoyed the show.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23977 on: October 20, 2013, 10:32:49 PM »
And honestly...who cares? Are peoples lives that uninteresting that they're upset with how they think people think about them? I wish I had that few problems.

High school students everywhere would beg to differ.  It's nice to look back now and know I have the self-confidence that I don't care about the kind of things my peers said and did then, but it's a rare high school student who can truly not be bothered even a little bit.  The girl who wrote the article isn't that much older than high school, and I can completely understand assuming a dirty look is accompanied by judgemental thoughts - especially if you're often in situations where those judgemental thoughts are frequently expressed aloud.

This. It's all part of growing up and becoming less self-centered. Teens are self-centered to a degree because they're figuring out their own identity, so they focus more on their own concerns rather than everyone else's.
Sometimes, though, it hangs on well past the teen years.  I wrote a couple of years back about a woman on another board that I called Toxic Woman.  The board has a thread just for 'get it off your chest' complaints.  Toxic Woman came on one day just absolutely furious because a woman of another ethnic group had looked at her on the bus.  Nothing was said to her or about her, but TW JUST KNEW that the other woman hated her because she was blonde and pretty and Ethnic Woman wasn't, so TW gave her a one-finger salute and spewed out a nasty flood of four-letter words to accompany it.   And she was still so angry about "being judged" that she treated us to a play-by-play of the whole thing.  TW was in her early THIRTIES.  ::)

She's no longer posting there, and the place is much nicer.   ;D
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MariaE

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23978 on: October 21, 2013, 02:41:13 AM »
Snipping the quote tree:


For those saying you shouldn't drive a stick on the roads until you're completely ready, that's not possible.  There are things that you can never "practice" for until you're on the road and in the situation.  I practiced and practiced with my dad in the local elementary school's parking lot, but still had problems on the roads until I got the feeling for it. 

Such as? Yes, of course, new drivers might have duh moments, but by and large you (general) should be competent enough at the point where you pass your test to handle your car properly on the road in all kinds of conditions and situations. (However, as I'm discovering on the other thread, all driving tests are not created equal.)

I've been driving stick for 16 years - I still stall occasionally if borrowing an unfamiliar car. That doesn't mean it's unsafe for me to be on the roads, it just means that whoever's behind me may have to wait a couple of seconds extra while I restart the car.

All part and parcel of driving. Even in countries with mandatory official driving lessons in a manual car (which is the case in Denmark).
 
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23979 on: October 21, 2013, 02:49:27 AM »
That's been taken to another thread.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23980 on: October 21, 2013, 07:18:04 AM »
And honestly...who cares? Are peoples lives that uninteresting that they're upset with how they think people think about them? I wish I had that few problems.

High school students everywhere would beg to differ.  It's nice to look back now and know I have the self-confidence that I don't care about the kind of things my peers said and did then, but it's a rare high school student who can truly not be bothered even a little bit.  The girl who wrote the article isn't that much older than high school, and I can completely understand assuming a dirty look is accompanied by judgemental thoughts - especially if you're often in situations where those judgemental thoughts are frequently expressed aloud.

This. It's all part of growing up and becoming less self-centered. Teens are self-centered to a degree because they're figuring out their own identity, so they focus more on their own concerns rather than everyone else's.

And being judged doesn't stop in HS. I joined a group function last night for the first time. I live in a upper income neighborhood. When asked where I lived by a gentleman who I was enjoying visiting with I said near a major intersection. He continued to be friendly. When he asked about my kid's school I said "no, we are south of interstate so they went to X HS."  I could see him physically start closing off to me and then excused himself and didn't really engage with me except to make a couple of jokes about "rich" people.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23981 on: October 21, 2013, 09:26:34 AM »
Called the office again. So far, no results. I will call local Animal Control tomorrow if things don't improve.

Any update on the poor pups?

Yes. Apparently, only one actually lives there, the gray and white Pit Bull puppy. He is adorable. They have started walking him! And he is only out on the balcony during their dinner hour. Much more acceptable. I know they were fined for not paying the pet deposit and for dog sitting, which is not allowed at our complex. I hope they are getting their stuff together.

They have also stopped with the parties for the most part.

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23982 on: October 21, 2013, 01:02:44 PM »
I remember being called a "spoiled brat" by some so-called friends when I was in Grade 4.  Their reasoning was that I was an only child, and therefore I must be spoiled rotten and get everything I asked for.  I laughed until I cried when I heard that - my parents were not well-off at all, and the idea of getting everything my little heart desired was ridiculous. 

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23983 on: October 21, 2013, 02:24:08 PM »
Best special snowflake driver this morning!!!

I had to drive Partner into work as her car needed some work done on it, so I'm on the overpass to go from one freeway to the next and at this pass we have several freeways funneling onto one so things can get congested from everyone trying to get on. So we're all just inching along and this mini-van comes out from several cars behind us gets on the shoulder (we were in the right lane because we'd be getting off as soon as we got on), and blazes past everyone, apparently he was far too important to wait in traffic (of course he was going to have to merge in again as soon as he got past all of us).

What he didn't see was the police officer right behind me and Partner. Who flipped on his lights and went after Mr. I'm so special I don't wait. I had a small sense of joy at seeing him pulled over on the side of the road while the rest of us passed him. If you thought traffic was going to make you late...the cop is gonna make you super late!

VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23984 on: October 21, 2013, 02:44:46 PM »
I was leaving the closest WalMart to head home, as I was coming up the access road, I was going to be crossing a railroad track.

Fine, plenty of time...except that the large vehicle ahead of me slowed to the speed of someone walking as they rolled across the tracks - with me behind them, the train coming close enough that the lights just started flashing, the train whistles at us, and the gates come down when I finally get off (no space to go around the SUV, as the two lanes merged to one about two car lengths ahead of his front wheels).  The pick up (UTE) behind me must have been very relieved to have me moving as fast as possible once the SUV picked up a little speed.  The gates must have come down right behind his tail pipe, I swear!
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?