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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6739884 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24150 on: October 31, 2013, 09:56:58 AM »
@ Mommy Penguin

In the city where I attended university, if you (general you) run out into traffic or are otherwise improperly crossing the road (against the light, not at a crosswalk, etc) and get hit by a car... you would be the one to get a ticket, even if you were injured.  The driver of the car, as long as they weren't doing anything illegal like speeding, would have no consequences.

Except for the horrible nightmares from severely injuring or killing someone.  I always feel sorry for truckers who end up killing someone because that someone does something stupid like backing up in the live lanes of the freeway.  Even though they managed to only kill the person winning the Darwin Award, it must be horrible for those poor guys (and gals) to live with.
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BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24151 on: October 31, 2013, 09:59:05 AM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24152 on: October 31, 2013, 10:05:35 AM »
@ Mommy Penguin

In the city where I attended university, if you (general you) run out into traffic or are otherwise improperly crossing the road (against the light, not at a crosswalk, etc) and get hit by a car... you would be the one to get a ticket, even if you were injured.  The driver of the car, as long as they weren't doing anything illegal like speeding, would have no consequences.

Except for the horrible nightmares from severely injuring or killing someone. I always feel sorry for truckers who end up killing someone because that someone does something stupid like backing up in the live lanes of the freeway.  Even though they managed to only kill the person winning the Darwin Award, it must be horrible for those poor guys (and gals) to live with.

I have a good friend who's a trucker who just went through this, though in this case the other driver was trying to get hit by a truck.  He doesn't actually know if the other driver eventually survived (he was alive but with severe head and chest trauma when he was transported from the scene).  That was two weeks ago.  My friend is driving again, but he's still an emotional wreck.
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VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24153 on: October 31, 2013, 10:10:45 AM »
A singer out on tour in a bus (living quarters while being driven from place to place) was in one of these accidents and the man was killed by the bus.

The singer has apologized to the family - but the news article did mention that it was dark and the man was wearing dark clothing when HE walked in front of the bus.  I haven't seen a follow up as to whether the guy was drunk or what else might have contributed to the accident.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24154 on: October 31, 2013, 10:43:38 AM »
People in dark clothing have NO idea how invisible they are to someone in a car. Esp. in NYC, where few people drive, we think of the streets as being "well lit" (and they are--but...you're wearing black), pedestrians impinge on the roadway all the time, and everybody wears black.

I didn't realize it until *I* was driving in NYC.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24155 on: October 31, 2013, 10:44:17 AM »
^^If it is the incident I heard about, the victim was arrested previously for walking down the middle of the road.  Impeding traffic, I think the charge was.  I feel badly for the singer and the driver of the bus.  Not exactly the kind of publicity you want.
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MindsEye

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24156 on: October 31, 2013, 11:24:12 AM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24157 on: October 31, 2013, 12:30:54 PM »
We have kids who live nearby and are really, really stupid about riding their bikes into the street.  See, ours is a through street with a great deal of curb parking and traffic due to the fact that there's a popular ice cream shop across the street and a lot of trucks go up and down this street as well.  And not everyone does the speed limit. 

I live right next to an alley and the kids would set up a ramp for their stunt bikes and without even looking for oncoming traffic (hard to do anyway with cars and houses) they'd ride their bikes off the ramp and into the street or they'd just go forth without looking for traffic at all.

Another neighbor gave them a lecture about it but it didn't stop them.  I'm not hoping they'll get hurt, but I'm sure one day it will happen and I would not be surprised if the kids whine "But we're just kids!! Bikes have the right of way!"

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z_squared82

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24158 on: October 31, 2013, 12:48:05 PM »
We have kids who live nearby and are really, really stupid about riding their bikes into the street.  See, ours is a through street with a great deal of curb parking and traffic due to the fact that there's a popular ice cream shop across the street and a lot of trucks go up and down this street as well.  And not everyone does the speed limit. 

I live right next to an alley and the kids would set up a ramp for their stunt bikes and without even looking for oncoming traffic (hard to do anyway with cars and houses) they'd ride their bikes off the ramp and into the street or they'd just go forth without looking for traffic at all.

Another neighbor gave them a lecture about it but it didn't stop them.  I'm not hoping they'll get hurt, but I'm sure one day it will happen and I would not be surprised if the kids whine "But we're just kids!! Bikes have the right of way!"

As I always say, the pedestrian/biker might have the right of way, but if a pedestrian/biker and a car get in a fight, the car wins. Period.

Speaking of special snowflakes in an alley, I remembered a double encounter from a while back. I was at a party, standing outside on the back porch. The back porch overlooked a cobblestone alley, abutted by yards and detached garages. There was room for exactly one car, but I have no idea if it was a one-way alley. Some geniuses decided to set up a game of corn hole in the alley (corn hole being a game where you toss bean bags at angled wooden boards). So, special for setting up their game in the alley when they could have set it up in the grass of the backyard. They were soon chased out of the alley by Special Snowflake 2, in a car, who couldn’t be bothered to wait for them to move, and so just drove over the boards. No one was hurt. I feel confident alcohol was involved all around. (It was a big drinking weekend in my city.)

Tea Drinker

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24159 on: October 31, 2013, 12:50:49 PM »
We have kids who live nearby and are really, really stupid about riding their bikes into the street.  See, ours is a through street with a great deal of curb parking and traffic due to the fact that there's a popular ice cream shop across the street and a lot of trucks go up and down this street as well.  And not everyone does the speed limit. 

I'm not going to call kids--or even adults--special snowflakes for having the audacity to act as though the speed limit applies to trucks near a popular ice cream shop. "Reckless," perhaps, but the special snowflakes are the truck drivers who assume that speed limits are for other people, or other kinds of vehicle. Also, if one truck speeds down a city street, I blame the trucker. If lots of trucks do, it's time for the city to either start enforcing the speed limit, or redesign the street in ways that reduce traffic speeds.

OK, if the speed limit sign on the interstate says "60" you can usually get away with going 65 or 70. That doesn't make it okay to go 40 on a street that is posted as 25 or 30, in a neighborhood with sidewalks and children. It seems that a lot of people assume that the "real" speed limit is always ten mph more than is posted, even on residential streets, or curved exit ramps.
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mumma to KMC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24160 on: October 31, 2013, 01:01:16 PM »
People in dark clothing have NO idea how invisible they are to someone in a car. Esp. in NYC, where few people drive, we think of the streets as being "well lit" (and they are--but...you're wearing black), pedestrians impinge on the roadway all the time, and everybody wears black.

I didn't realize it until *I* was driving in NYC.

We have this issue here our (small) town. Heading out of town, toward the country (and my house), with little lighting, there is also a curve and lots of people like to walk in that area for some reason, in dark clothing, at night, half in the road. This road is a State Route, so it's fairly well travelled, as well. The worst I would say are those on bicycles that don't have reflectors.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24161 on: October 31, 2013, 01:15:55 PM »
We have kids who live nearby and are really, really stupid about riding their bikes into the street.  See, ours is a through street with a great deal of curb parking and traffic due to the fact that there's a popular ice cream shop across the street and a lot of trucks go up and down this street as well.  And not everyone does the speed limit. 

I'm not going to call kids--or even adults--special snowflakes for having the audacity to act as though the speed limit applies to trucks near a popular ice cream shop. "Reckless," perhaps, but the special snowflakes are the truck drivers who assume that speed limits are for other people, or other kinds of vehicle. Also, if one truck speeds down a city street, I blame the trucker. If lots of trucks do, it's time for the city to either start enforcing the speed limit, or redesign the street in ways that reduce traffic speeds.

OK, if the speed limit sign on the interstate says "60" you can usually get away with going 65 or 70. That doesn't make it okay to go 40 on a street that is posted as 25 or 30, in a neighborhood with sidewalks and children. It seems that a lot of people assume that the "real" speed limit is always ten mph more than is posted, even on residential streets, or curved exit ramps.

Honestly it's not the trucks that speed, as often they're bringing supplies to the ice cream shop across the street so they're already slowing down once they get to our end of the street and are stopping once they get there. 

I'm basing my "special snowflake" terminology for these particular kids because that's just how they are in general with their bikes, that there is just no territory off limits to them and they are either of the opinion that A) they're invincible or B) it's not their responsibility at all to watch out for the traffic. 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24162 on: October 31, 2013, 02:40:29 PM »
People in dark clothing have NO idea how invisible they are to someone in a car. Esp. in NYC, where few people drive, we think of the streets as being "well lit" (and they are--but...you're wearing black), pedestrians impinge on the roadway all the time, and everybody wears black.

I didn't realize it until *I* was driving in NYC.

When I was active duty military living in Phoenix, Arizona - the base was way out in a rural area (surrounded by farms on 80% of the boundaries - small area with a bar, a gas station, and base housing along one area and an "estate" owned by an heiress a mile or so south of the base.

The police found a body of a woman dressed all in black one morning - she'd apparently tried walking home from the bar to the trailer park down the highway a mile or so, and had tried to walk on the road in her high heels instead of the gravel shoulder.

The area was NOT well lit after you left the small enclave of businesses right up against the base perimeter fence and got into the stretch of farmland between the businesses and the trailer park.

I don't remember if they ever found out who might have run into her between two am (when the bars closed) and a couple of hours later (based on when she died) - there were also a few deer, dogs, coyotes, and the like roaming around - so whoever did hit her probably thought it was a black dog and not a human...because they never saw her (no flashlight, no reflective belt, vest, or jacket).

It wasn't that far from an observatory, come to think of it....really, really DARK between sunset & dawn, once the very few businesses closed down. (A bar, a Pizza Hut, two gas stations, and one car repair parts place, if I recall correctly).
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24163 on: October 31, 2013, 03:40:13 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24164 on: October 31, 2013, 04:32:22 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

A toy gun that the kid tried his hardest to make look real (removing the orange tip, for example).  When you've got a gun leveled at you, the first thought that comes to mind isn't asking the person wielding it "Hey, is that a toy?"
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