Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5527812 times)

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24165 on: October 31, 2013, 02:15:55 PM »
We have kids who live nearby and are really, really stupid about riding their bikes into the street.  See, ours is a through street with a great deal of curb parking and traffic due to the fact that there's a popular ice cream shop across the street and a lot of trucks go up and down this street as well.  And not everyone does the speed limit. 

I'm not going to call kids--or even adults--special snowflakes for having the audacity to act as though the speed limit applies to trucks near a popular ice cream shop. "Reckless," perhaps, but the special snowflakes are the truck drivers who assume that speed limits are for other people, or other kinds of vehicle. Also, if one truck speeds down a city street, I blame the trucker. If lots of trucks do, it's time for the city to either start enforcing the speed limit, or redesign the street in ways that reduce traffic speeds.

OK, if the speed limit sign on the interstate says "60" you can usually get away with going 65 or 70. That doesn't make it okay to go 40 on a street that is posted as 25 or 30, in a neighborhood with sidewalks and children. It seems that a lot of people assume that the "real" speed limit is always ten mph more than is posted, even on residential streets, or curved exit ramps.

Honestly it's not the trucks that speed, as often they're bringing supplies to the ice cream shop across the street so they're already slowing down once they get to our end of the street and are stopping once they get there. 

I'm basing my "special snowflake" terminology for these particular kids because that's just how they are in general with their bikes, that there is just no territory off limits to them and they are either of the opinion that A) they're invincible or B) it's not their responsibility at all to watch out for the traffic. 
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VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24166 on: October 31, 2013, 03:40:29 PM »
People in dark clothing have NO idea how invisible they are to someone in a car. Esp. in NYC, where few people drive, we think of the streets as being "well lit" (and they are--but...you're wearing black), pedestrians impinge on the roadway all the time, and everybody wears black.

I didn't realize it until *I* was driving in NYC.

When I was active duty military living in Phoenix, Arizona - the base was way out in a rural area (surrounded by farms on 80% of the boundaries - small area with a bar, a gas station, and base housing along one area and an "estate" owned by an heiress a mile or so south of the base.

The police found a body of a woman dressed all in black one morning - she'd apparently tried walking home from the bar to the trailer park down the highway a mile or so, and had tried to walk on the road in her high heels instead of the gravel shoulder.

The area was NOT well lit after you left the small enclave of businesses right up against the base perimeter fence and got into the stretch of farmland between the businesses and the trailer park.

I don't remember if they ever found out who might have run into her between two am (when the bars closed) and a couple of hours later (based on when she died) - there were also a few deer, dogs, coyotes, and the like roaming around - so whoever did hit her probably thought it was a black dog and not a human...because they never saw her (no flashlight, no reflective belt, vest, or jacket).

It wasn't that far from an observatory, come to think of it....really, really DARK between sunset & dawn, once the very few businesses closed down. (A bar, a Pizza Hut, two gas stations, and one car repair parts place, if I recall correctly).
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24167 on: October 31, 2013, 04:40:13 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24168 on: October 31, 2013, 05:32:22 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

A toy gun that the kid tried his hardest to make look real (removing the orange tip, for example).  When you've got a gun leveled at you, the first thought that comes to mind isn't asking the person wielding it "Hey, is that a toy?"
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Hillia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24169 on: October 31, 2013, 05:32:48 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

Yes, sadly, it does.  There have been recent shootings by young teens, and it was a very realistic looking gun.

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VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24170 on: October 31, 2013, 06:11:17 PM »
We have kids who live nearby and are really, really stupid about riding their bikes into the street.  See, ours is a through street with a great deal of curb parking and traffic due to the fact that there's a popular ice cream shop across the street and a lot of trucks go up and down this street as well.  And not everyone does the speed limit. 

I live right next to an alley and the kids would set up a ramp for their stunt bikes and without even looking for oncoming traffic (hard to do anyway with cars and houses) they'd ride their bikes off the ramp and into the street or they'd just go forth without looking for traffic at all.

Another neighbor gave them a lecture about it but it didn't stop them.  I'm not hoping they'll get hurt, but I'm sure one day it will happen and I would not be surprised if the kids whine "But we're just kids!! Bikes have the right of way!"

As I always say, the pedestrian/biker might have the right of way, but if a pedestrian/biker and a car get in a fight, the car wins. Period.

Speaking of special snowflakes in an alley, I remembered a double encounter from a while back. I was at a party, standing outside on the back porch. The back porch overlooked a cobblestone alley, abutted by yards and detached garages. There was room for exactly one car, but I have no idea if it was a one-way alley. Some geniuses decided to set up a game of corn hole in the alley (corn hole being a game where you toss bean bags at angled wooden boards). So, special for setting up their game in the alley when they could have set it up in the grass of the backyard. They were soon chased out of the alley by Special Snowflake 2, in a car, who couldn’t be bothered to wait for them to move, and so just drove over the boards. No one was hurt. I feel confident alcohol was involved all around. (It was a big drinking weekend in my city.)

A friend of ours and her husband were driving after dark YEARS ago when a kid in dark clothes, wearing a dark hoodie, no helmet, and on a bike with no lights ran a stop sign in front of them...and the bike & rider lost.  The parents woke up to the police telling them that their kid was dead while they tried to insist that he was upstairs, asleep in his bed, and had been for hours (after midnight). 

He'd gotten out his window and climbed down a tree to go bike riding (apparently not the first time) and he was wearing the dark clothes so that his parents wouldn't see him sneaking out....he was apparently heading home from where ever he'd been when he ran the stop sign in front of a car that didn't have a stop sign....

The police explained to the driver and passenger that they'd had no blame on them, based on no lights, dark clothing, running the stop sign, and all the rest...apparently he'd been SEEN riding around in the dark dressed the same way before, but was able to hide behind bushes, etc. when the police had tried to find him & get him to go home - or at least get some lights or reflective gear & a helmet.  But they didn't know who he was until it was too late...
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BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24171 on: October 31, 2013, 06:54:21 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

Yes, sadly, it does.  There have been recent shootings by young teens, and it was a very realistic looking gun.

Bear in mind that Santa Rosa is very close to the SF/Oakland Bay Area, where teen boys kill each other and any innocents that get in the way in broad daylight on crowded streets multiple times a day.  So the officer(s) have to assume that any realistic-looking gun is the real thing or they're dead.

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24172 on: October 31, 2013, 07:06:01 PM »
In Santa Rosa recently, a 13-year old boy had a toy AK-47 (with orange tip removed) and pointed it at a police officer.  The police officer shot him dead.  Now, a great many people are protesting and "demanding justice" for this kid. 

The kicker was that a passing driver saw the kid with the gun, rolled down the window, and told him to put it away because there was a police car coming.

I saw that article... the second kicker is that the kid also ignored the officers yelling at him to drop the gun.

I feel sorry for the officers.  The kid, not so much.
I think it says so,ethics terrible about the world where copss a assume a toy gun a kid is holding is real.

Yes, sadly, it does.  There have been recent shootings by young teens, and it was a very realistic looking gun.

Bear in mind that Santa Rosa is very close to the SF/Oakland Bay Area, where teen boys kill each other and any innocents that get in the way in broad daylight on crowded streets multiple times a day.  So the officer(s) have to assume that any realistic-looking gun is the real thing or they're dead.

POD to BarensMom, as well as Diane AKA Traska. A 13-year-old should know that pointing any kind of weapon, real or fake, at a cop, is a stupid idea. Refusing to stand down makes it monumentally stupid. As tragic as that boy's death is, he should have put the toy down.


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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24173 on: October 31, 2013, 07:18:55 PM »
The story is tragic on all accounts, but is not related to Special Snowflakes. I request that it not be discussed further on this thread.

I had to go and fuel up my vehicle after work. I reached the main road and realized that one lane on either side was closed due to medians being resurfaced. The light changes, and I signal to merge over to the middle lane from the left, as do all the cars in front of me. It was almost perfect synchronization until we reach the car in front of me and the car next to me. The car in front of me was an older lady in an older car. The car next to me is a fairly new small SUV, the driver has a blank stare and is fixed on the road either intent on not allowing anyone to merge or oblivious to the cars around her.

Lots of SS drivers on the way home, and no full moon to blame. Maybe they were all heading to a party.

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24174 on: October 31, 2013, 07:45:23 PM »
The SS's that are getting on my nerves are the people making a ton of noise in my dorm. Like I expect to hear people talking at normal volumes, but shrieking and running down the halls isn't okay, nor is playing dubstep outside loud enough to make the walls vibrate. I walked to the RA's room, but by the time I was ready to knock on the door, the noise stopped.

Their party habits do not supersede the fact that I need at least 6 hours of sleep in order to not crash on the road driving to church, and the behavior is driving me insane.


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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24175 on: October 31, 2013, 09:26:30 PM »
kherbert05 wrote:

"What was the main topic of conversation - how unfair the cracked screen policy was and how the school should pay for big grips for all issued ipads. (I have 7 Ipads from 2 other programs. I paid for the cases.)"

I'm having trouble understanding who's responsible for what.  Are you saying that the teachers will be responsible for half the repair cost if an iPad in their class gets cracked, or is it the school that's half responsible, or both?  If teachers are being held responsible for repairing stuff that costs hundreds of dollars, I can see why they'd balk at that.  I certainly wouldn't want iPads in my classroom if I was going to be held financially responsible for damage the students did to them.  Would it be reasonable to force teachers to pay for textbooks that the kids ripped, or make the teacher pay halfsies if a student decided to destroy a smartboard?  And also, why should teachers be paying for protective cases for school iPads?  If the school can't afford to protect them properly, they shouldn't be distributing them anyway because that's just asking for more repair costs.

Virg
The district has a great deal with the vendor - so it is only around $100 to get it fixed. The principal is willing to discuss what happened. Most of the screen breakage at my school 2 causes.
1. The teacher/teacher's family broke it
2. Not thinking about where you place the Ipads in centers. I have mine on the bottom shelf of a cart. THe kids sit on the carpet while using them. I do NOT allow them to use them at their desks, because we are required to have our kids in groups. The kids put the Ipad on the "table" but across 2 desk. A desk gets shifted and bang goes the Ipad. Or they forget they have the head phones attached to both them and the ipad and walk off.


Also she clarified today - every broken Ipad from the group purchased last year - the Big Grip had been removed. I get why - If I don't have a kid to help with nice small fingers - I have to take it out of the case to charge it because I can't reach the charger through the case and set it in place. Still we were told to keep the big grips on.
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Kaymyth

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24176 on: October 31, 2013, 09:31:57 PM »
Reverse-SS Everyone But Me Has The Right Of Way:

It's not often that a driver goes and visits the realm of Special Snowflake by trotting out onto the road of politeness and coming up to it from the other side.

Yesterday, coming home from work, I reach a T intersection where I have to turn.  I turn left.

Coming from my right on the road I must turn onto is a lady who also wishes to turn left.  Since I have a stop sign and the other road doesn't, people on that road automatically have the right of way.  Lady is in the left turn lane with her blinker on.  But, instead of pulling up to turn, she sits back *behind* the intersection, apparently waiting for me to go ahead of her. 

No.  No, no, no.  I'm sorry lady, but I'm not going to break traffic laws because you have more courtesy than sense.  I sat there and waited, with a buildup of cars behind me, until she finally got the hint and took her turn.



Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24177 on: October 31, 2013, 09:54:27 PM »
A very stupid snowflake took a flying run from the local hs into bumper to bumper traffic on the main road. He's very lucky nobody's car killed him :o It's especially messed up because recently *death warning* a student a few miles away had been hit by two different cars, in an area where students often unsafely ran into the streets

I just ran into a news article the other day about a kid who ran into the street and got hit by a car (hit and run) on his 7th birthday (he survived and was fine, barely injured).  The news article was focused on the horrible driver, the "bad man," etc.  I saw the security footage they're posting.  The kid came *running* full out into the road from behind a parked car!  I have no idea if the driver was going over the speed limit, and obviously he should have stopped (although, given that the boy's injuries mostly amounted to his foot being run over, it's *possible* that the driver didn't even see the boy/realize he was hit), but really, I think the boy and his family are kind of special snowflakes for putting all the blame on the driver, when, unless the driver was really speeding, the boy seems mostly at fault.  And, seriously?  I have a 6-year-old.  What was the boy *thinking* to run out into traffic like that?  Hadn't his parents taught him about that?  I can't imagine my 6-year-old *ever* just deciding it was a really fun thing to bolt out into traffic.  Nor the 5-year-old, either!
I came thisclose to hitting a child about the same age, but managed to brake in time.  And his mother had the nerve to yell at ME for my "bad driving."  I pointed out that if I wasn't a GOOD driver, her kid would be dead.  ::)
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24178 on: October 31, 2013, 10:08:18 PM »
Is possible to have a split off thread for the SS driving stories?

AngelicGamer

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24179 on: November 01, 2013, 01:16:59 AM »
Is possible to have a split off thread for the SS driving stories?

I actually don't mind having them here.  I can't drive but I like hearing about them.




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