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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6628147 times)

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Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24225 on: November 02, 2013, 02:57:49 PM »
Okay, I'll confess that when I hang laundry on the line, I tend to put the more personal laundry (underwear, diapers) on the center lines, and less personal laundry (outer clothes, sheets, towels) on the outer lines.  I don't make a big deal out of it if it's just not possible, but... yeah, I'd rather not have my bras in really plain view.
When I was growing up, we had a drying rack indoors for the 'fine washables'. But after I moved out of my parents' house, I just hung stuff on the line, although I did tend to use your method, of putting them on the center line with other things on the outsides. But really, I can't ever remember looking at a neighbor's clothesline long enough to really form an assessment of what was hanging there.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24226 on: November 02, 2013, 03:04:00 PM »
Part of my reasoning was that my clothesline was in a side yard, and we were one house in from the corner.  So if the laundry was fairly colorful, it would catch your eye as you rounded the corner and drove down the street.  So I wasn't so much concerned about intentionally nosy neighbors as I was of unintentionally noticing drivers who might not care to have to see it.  :)
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Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24227 on: November 02, 2013, 03:38:22 PM »
Okay, I'll confess that when I hang laundry on the line, I tend to put the more personal laundry (underwear, diapers) on the center lines, and less personal laundry (outer clothes, sheets, towels) on the outer lines.  I don't make a big deal out of it if it's just not possible, but... yeah, I'd rather not have my bras in really plain view.

There's also the fact that on a full washing line the centre lines get less light and air. So naturally you hang the lighter and more easily dried stuff there, whereas your jeans (say) need all the drying power they can get.

Plus on the classic rotary clothes line design those inner lines are really small, so you hang the smaller stuff there. Socks are definitely not shameful but that's where they go, too.
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Snooks

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24228 on: November 02, 2013, 05:19:07 PM »
There's a furious letter writing campaign going on in my area at the moment opposing a certain brand of supermarket that wants to set up a "local" shop (a smaller version of it's supermarket shop, think like a combo of a newsagent and off license). It's mainly being run by a group of residents who are living accross the road from the proposed site, who would apparently rather it stayed empty than gain a mini-market than most people in the area really quite want, as that area doesn't really have anything nearby that fills that purpose. The would-be investors have tried to handle any possible complaints by making sure the shop front is tasteful, unobtrusive, etc, nope, they just don't want it.

The campaign is called "Say No to Sainsburys!". Most of the residents who want the supermarket refer to it as "Say No to Snobbery".

I don't know. These places are really handy for bread and milk and late night chocolate, but they can pose a danger to the smaller local traders who can't compete on price and people feel strongly about that so I'm not sure its entirely SS not to want one there. Case in point: Tesco recently opened up an Express (or Extra, I'm not sure of the difference) in my local high street and there was much the same feeling locally (although I don't think we had a letter writing campaign!) but in this case the damage seems to have been self-limiting, because hardly anybody ever uses the place. It's most odd; it's bang in the middle of a high street, two minutes away from the station and therefore on the main route home for a lot of people but the place is almost always empty. You might get a few picking up dinner in there at rush hour, but that's about it. I went in there at 10am on a Saturday morning a few weeks ago and I was the only person in there. I'm not sure I can see it lasting if it's that underused.

I have mixed feelings about it - I'm quite glad it's there (see 'late night chocolate'!) but I'm also glad that people don't seem to be using it for every day stuff and so our very good quality independent traders like the fishmonger and the veg shop don't seem to be suffering too much and are therefore likely to stay open.

So in this case, I think the community has done the right and non-SS thing: voted with their feet and let the chips fall where they may.

The area that the Sainsburies wants to set up in could actually quite do with it being set up though - there's no local businesses in the area for quite a way, so it would be used. It's right in the middle of several residential areas, which is why it's rather odd that no one has proposed setting up a mimi-market before

I think there's currently a campaign against Sainsbury's where I live.  There's definitely been two against Tesco.  The Tescos opened and are well used, I'd love to know if all the people who kicked up such a fuss are boycotting it (which I have no issue with) but I suspect they're not.

StarDrifter

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24229 on: November 03, 2013, 07:39:10 AM »
I think our new neighbours might get an SS nomination - it makes me VERY glad that we put our own house on the market this week and plan to move fairly soon.

The old owners bought the house ~2 years ago and spent that time gutting it and redoing it to flip the property and sold it in September. They came over to let us know when they were leaving and Thursday night we had a nice little street party to say goodbye to them (only 12 houses in the cul-de-sac, so there were about 25 people there total).

Old neighbours had their beds and the last of their things moved out Friday during the day and the house was vacant Friday night.

The new neighbours arrived at 0600 on Saturday morning and I know this because the 3 boys (aged about 8 to 13, I would guess from the looks of them) apparently felt the need to YELL at each other as they got out of the car at the NEW house about how great the NEW house is and who gets what bedroom.

From across the court in my own bedroom I heard the whole conversation - they also woke Baby Wolverine up.

I gave them a pass because hey - new house, excited, been in the car however long at this hour, whatever boys. Just keep it down in future.

Nope.

Saturday evening (after 7pm) and there are three bicycles doing circles of the cul-de-sac and YELLING is happening. Then a cricket ball hit my front door and landed in a potted plant. The crash, again, woke the baby. Who screamed and refused to settle back down because there was now YELLING going on outside her window.

Husband went outside and grabbed the cricket ball and spoke directly to the kids, telling them to keep it down, there's a baby sleeping. And to get some helmets on.

New Neighbour Mum walks out her front door hands on hips and SCREAMS at her sons to GET AWAY FROM THE STRANGE MAN, then YELLS at Husband, who hands over the cricket ball and says that SHE needs to keep her kids (and their toys) out of HIS yard.

Mum tells him it's just a ball and there will be more.

Husband (sassy pants that he is and also cranky because Baby is cranky) says "Good, I haven't got any good cricket balls. I'll keep the next one."

Then this afternoon (Sunday) I had Wolverine in the stroller in the sun while I did some gardening and a nice neighbour came over and asked if Husband had really threatened to hit the new kids with a cricket bat if they came back into our yard and didn't stop riding their bikes 'on a public road'. (she was joking, she'd actually heard most of the exchange thanks to New Mum's volume control issues).

Sigh.

I am so glad we're moving, but then again, the drama could be entertaining...
... it might frighten them.
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MissRose

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24230 on: November 04, 2013, 10:13:05 AM »
People in dark clothing have NO idea how invisible they are to someone in a car. Esp. in NYC, where few people drive, we think of the streets as being "well lit" (and they are--but...you're wearing black), pedestrians impinge on the roadway all the time, and everybody wears black.

I didn't realize it until *I* was driving in NYC.

We have this issue here our (small) town. Heading out of town, toward the country (and my house), with little lighting, there is also a curve and lots of people like to walk in that area for some reason, in dark clothing, at night, half in the road. This road is a State Route, so it's fairly well travelled, as well. The worst I would say are those on bicycles that don't have reflectors.

My mother walks with a few other neighbors in the morning.  They all wear reflective gear and carry flashlights. 

Xandraea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24231 on: November 04, 2013, 11:04:00 AM »

My mother walks with a few other neighbors in the morning.  They all wear reflective gear and carry flashlights.

(snipped the quote tree)

I really wish all pedestrians would do this anytime it's not brilliantly sunny outside! I think people really don't realize how invisible they are at twilight/dawn and on gray days, particularly when they're wearing dull or dark colors. My dd and I always point out the ones we can see from far away, wearing hunter orange or yellow, or reflective so easily visible. Just the other night, around 9:30pm, quite dark, I didn't see a darkly-clothed pedestrian at all until he walked under a streetlight only about 10 feet from me, and even then, I saw his little white dog first. Thank goodness they weren't crossing the street at the time.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24232 on: November 04, 2013, 04:32:12 PM »

My mother walks with a few other neighbors in the morning.  They all wear reflective gear and carry flashlights.

(snipped the quote tree)

I really wish all pedestrians would do this anytime it's not brilliantly sunny outside! I think people really don't realize how invisible they are at twilight/dawn and on gray days, particularly when they're wearing dull or dark colors. My dd and I always point out the ones we can see from far away, wearing hunter orange or yellow, or reflective so easily visible. Just the other night, around 9:30pm, quite dark, I didn't see a darkly-clothed pedestrian at all until he walked under a streetlight only about 10 feet from me, and even then, I saw his little white dog first. Thank goodness they weren't crossing the street at the time.

And this is exactly why all my running gear, including my shoes, are neon colored.  I don't run at night, but I do sometimes run at dawn/dusk, and I want to be as visible as possible.
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mumma to KMC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24233 on: November 04, 2013, 04:41:18 PM »
In addition to those who don't wear clothing that allow drivers to see them, I'd also like to nominate drivers who do not turn their lights on when driving through a torrential South Georgia summer downpour. I've come upon a few drivers that I didn't know were there until I was right on top of them, because of their lack of lights.


cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24234 on: November 04, 2013, 05:04:01 PM »
In addition to those who don't wear clothing that allow drivers to see them, I'd also like to nominate drivers who do not turn their lights on when driving through a torrential South Georgia summer downpour. I've come upon a few drivers that I didn't know were there until I was right on top of them, because of their lack of lights.

Those people bother me too. I have a really hard time seeing at night for various reasons (mostly just eye-strain), and I've had to deal with people driving without lights on when it's 10 p.m. and/or raining like Goliath's girlfriend just broke up with him. This isn't rocket surgery:

1. If your lights don't work, try to get them fixed ASAP.
2. If they do, you need to flick the lever. Truly, it's not that hard to do in any car I've ridden in, standard or automatic.

I told my mom a long time ago that the auto industry should make it standard that headlights come on when windshield wipers are used for longer than, say, 3-5 minutes.




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TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24235 on: November 04, 2013, 05:05:13 PM »

I told my mom a long time ago that the auto industry should make it standard that headlights come on when windshield wipers are used for longer than, say, 3-5 minutes.


Many of the newer cars do--my FIL had one that turned the lights when the wipers were on. And he had one that turned the lights on when sensors detected less ambient light.

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24236 on: November 04, 2013, 05:09:39 PM »

I told my mom a long time ago that the auto industry should make it standard that headlights come on when windshield wipers are used for longer than, say, 3-5 minutes.


Many of the newer cars do--my FIL had one that turned the lights when the wipers were on. And he had one that turned the lights on when sensors detected less ambient light.

That's awesome! I wish my car had that capability. :)




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lilfox

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24237 on: November 04, 2013, 05:20:19 PM »

I told my mom a long time ago that the auto industry should make it standard that headlights come on when windshield wipers are used for longer than, say, 3-5 minutes.


Many of the newer cars do--my FIL had one that turned the lights when the wipers were on. And he had one that turned the lights on when sensors detected less ambient light.

That's awesome! I wish my car had that capability. :)

Mine does - it works great, unless you live in a place that is very gloomy during 6+ months of the year and/or has very slanting sunlight during morning/evening times.  Then you are the snowflake whose headlights seem to be on, off, on, off every few minutes depending on how the light is hitting the sensors.   ::)   :)

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24238 on: November 04, 2013, 05:23:29 PM »
My headlights have an auto feature so they come on when they sense it is dark enough for them.  But they don't come on when the windshield wipers get turned on.  I'm going to mention that when I have my appointment on Thursday to put on my snow tires.  My Dad's Sebring had an auto feature that not only put the lights on when it was getting darker but would turn them on with the windshield wipers.
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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24239 on: November 04, 2013, 05:31:05 PM »
I think you can get after market lights that will do this
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