Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5537817 times)

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Carotte

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24555 on: November 27, 2013, 05:35:17 PM »
Getting back to the kid that was hurt, this confused me...

"He will be spending months regaining his muscles. He is a sporty kid and will have to be out of contact sport for a few months."

Uh, he got stitches?  What does that have to do with regaining his muscles?  I did a face plant into our fireplace and got stitches above my eye and in the middle of the forehead.  I was back in action pretty much as soon as we got home from the ER. 

Am I missing something?  Did he injure something else?

My guess is that he probably also suffered a concussion and has been ordered to stay way from a lot of sports for a while. Therefore, he will lose muscle condition that he will have to work to regain.

A concussion will keep you out of contact sports for a week maybe two.  If he has that serious of a brain contusion that he can't do contact sports for months and months, then yeah that's different.  However, had he not been up there in the first place, it wouldn't have happened

Not to mention there are lots of exercises he can do (swimming, aerobics, stationary biking) that are not contact sports.

It sounds like it was a nasty accident, and I feel sorry for the boy. But I think that when the mother ("He may have headaches for the rest of his life! We won't know until then, will we?") heard him go "thunk" she also heard "ka-ching!"

There's half a chance that this is mostly attention grabbing and scamming technique from the mother (and even if it isn't it's still her/her kids fault or bad luck, whatever applies) but I hate parents like that who act like it's the end of the world if their kid is not 'whole'.
Kid might have migraines, so does plenty of other people for no apparent reason what so ever, it doesn't mean he can't live a normal life.
I remember a tv program and a mother who was still angry about the car accident her son had been (drunk driver, not the son) from which he came out alive but with only one arm. From hearing the mother, with one arm, her son was nothing. he won't be able to do nothing of his life, it's now ruined, ruined I tell you!!!!!
Yeah, I don't wish this on anyone, but way to be supportive of your son! you're telling him he's now useless, how is that going to make him feel or help him cope with his condition?
I'd be finding resources, people who can show him life can be normal, that you can do great things in any conditions and that having all your limbs does not make you more perfect.

CuriousParty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24556 on: November 27, 2013, 07:45:22 PM »
Getting back to the kid that was hurt, this confused me...

"He will be spending months regaining his muscles. He is a sporty kid and will have to be out of contact sport for a few months."

Uh, he got stitches?  What does that have to do with regaining his muscles?  I did a face plant into our fireplace and got stitches above my eye and in the middle of the forehead.  I was back in action pretty much as soon as we got home from the ER. 

Am I missing something?  Did he injure something else?

My guess is that he probably also suffered a concussion and has been ordered to stay way from a lot of sports for a while. Therefore, he will lose muscle condition that he will have to work to regain.

A concussion will keep you out of contact sports for a week maybe two.  If he has that serious of a brain contusion that he can't do contact sports for months and months, then yeah that's different.  However, had he not been up there in the first place, it wouldn't have happened

I don't have a dog in the should be-shouldn't be on the wall, but had to address this. We are learning more and more about concussions every day, and the current knowledge is clear that the old suggestion of a week or two of rest from contact sports is insufficient. For even mild concussions the recommendations now lean toward comprehensive brain rest (no contact, no significant exercise, even no intensive studying/academic work) for a week or two, then modified activity for a period of time. How long depends on a lot of individual factors, including history of concussion, severity of impact, age, gender, etc. I have seen many individuals with "mild" concussion (though now the language is changing to call it what it is - a traumatic brain injury) who are still on restrictions months after the incident.

This is your friendly PSA on concussion. Please see a real life medical professional for actual advice :)

And anyone who is wondering how anyone keeps an active, school age child on that kind of restriction, all can say is there are a great many parents deserving of great sympathy. And maybe a drink.

CuriousParty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24557 on: November 27, 2013, 07:52:48 PM »
Getting back to the kid that was hurt, this confused me...

"He will be spending months regaining his muscles. He is a sporty kid and will have to be out of contact sport for a few months."

Uh, he got stitches?  What does that have to do with regaining his muscles?  I did a face plant into our fireplace and got stitches above my eye and in the middle of the forehead.  I was back in action pretty much as soon as we got home from the ER. 

Am I missing something?  Did he injure something else?

My guess is that he probably also suffered a concussion and has been ordered to stay way from a lot of sports for a while. Therefore, he will lose muscle condition that he will have to work to regain.

A concussion will keep you out of contact sports for a week maybe two.  If he has that serious of a brain contusion that he can't do contact sports for months and months, then yeah that's different.  However, had he not been up there in the first place, it wouldn't have happened

Not to mention there are lots of exercises he can do (swimming, aerobics, stationary biking) that are not contact sports.

It sounds like it was a nasty accident, and I feel sorry for the boy. But I think that when the mother ("He may have headaches for the rest of his life! We won't know until then, will we?") heard him go "thunk" she also heard "ka-ching!"

Whoa, I know this story is raising ire, but I think that's taking it a step too far, Twik. Never once when I have heard the sound of any of my kids heads hitting anything have I ever thought anything other than "Oh my God please let him/her be okay." Whatever her motivation might or might now be now, I think your statement just...goes too far.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24558 on: November 27, 2013, 09:40:37 PM »
Thanks curious party :)  I have personally left the contact sports part of my life, however, I have plenty of relatives who still take part through schools.

Marga

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24559 on: November 28, 2013, 02:45:55 AM »
Wasn't there a thread about this woman?  Or her twin?  LOL

http://notalwaysworking.com/someones-having-a-beef-part-2/32585

When I read that one my jaw dropped.
Huh? What? Really? What the ...
I've got nothing.

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24560 on: November 28, 2013, 09:19:17 AM »
Whoa, I know this story is raising ire, but I think that's taking it a step too far, Twik. Never once when I have heard the sound of any of my kids heads hitting anything have I ever thought anything other than "Oh my God please let him/her be okay." Whatever her motivation might or might now be now, I think your statement just...goes too far.

Yes, but you're a normal parent, not a scammer.

I'm sure this woman was upset and frightened at the time her child was hurt (at least I hope she was!), but she seems to have quickly moved into "what can I get for this?" territory. I didn't mean to imply it was instantaneous.
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shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24561 on: November 28, 2013, 09:35:10 AM »
Wasn't there a thread about this woman?  Or her twin?  LOL

http://notalwaysworking.com/someones-having-a-beef-part-2/32585

When I read that one my jaw dropped.
Huh? What? Really? What the ...
I've got nothing.

The only thing I can say I hope she would have been fired for throwing out everyone's lunches not that "everyone lunch deserves a reprimand and my purse deserves firing" I hate that lunches are considers so much less when it comes to stealing (in this case throwing away) then anything else.

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24562 on: November 28, 2013, 02:02:50 PM »
Whoa, I know this story is raising ire, but I think that's taking it a step too far, Twik. Never once when I have heard the sound of any of my kids heads hitting anything have I ever thought anything other than "Oh my God please let him/her be okay." Whatever her motivation might or might now be now, I think your statement just...goes too far.

Yes, but you're a normal parent, not a scammer.

I'm sure this woman was upset and frightened at the time her child was hurt (at least I hope she was!), but she seems to have quickly moved into "what can I get for this?" territory. I didn't mean to imply it was instantaneous.

Unfortunately, this is possible. And there are some truly horrendous people out there. I was once in line at a bank, and the two women in front of me were chatting. It came up that one of them had a child with some genetic disorder, and (among many more pertinent things) she got a small sum of money every month or so from the government to help manage it. From what she said, it sounded like a rather unpleasant thing for any child to have. The other woman simply said, "I wish my son had [awful disorder]. You're so lucky--you get free money! Is it contagious? He should come over to play!"

There are people out there who view children's illnesses and injury as potential money, with no thought whatsoever for the children involved. It's absolutely sickening. I don't know about the woman in this story, but it's important to remember that just because something is unthinkable to a normal, caring person, it doesn't mean that it isn't a standard train of thought for others.

DollyPond

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24563 on: November 28, 2013, 02:47:38 PM »
I encountered Ms. Special I'm-taking-over-the-management-of-this-store Snowflake.

I was shopping at a Ross store last Saturday where there are separate checkouts each with their own line.  Ms. Snowflake loudly declared that there was only one line and that everyone needed to stand in the one line before walking up to an individual checkout.

She was so obnoxious to others (people who had the audacity to skirt the one line) that people stood in her one line until she went to her register whereupon the whole line broke up and people went to stand in individual lines.

The whole thing was pretty comical.

CuriousParty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24564 on: November 28, 2013, 07:17:47 PM »
Whoa, I know this story is raising ire, but I think that's taking it a step too far, Twik. Never once when I have heard the sound of any of my kids heads hitting anything have I ever thought anything other than "Oh my God please let him/her be okay." Whatever her motivation might or might now be now, I think your statement just...goes too far.

Yes, but you're a normal parent, not a scammer.

I'm sure this woman was upset and frightened at the time her child was hurt (at least I hope she was!), but she seems to have quickly moved into "what can I get for this?" territory. I didn't mean to imply it was instantaneous.

Unfortunately, this is possible. And there are some truly horrendous people out there. I was once in line at a bank, and the two women in front of me were chatting. It came up that one of them had a child with some genetic disorder, and (among many more pertinent things) she got a small sum of money every month or so from the government to help manage it. From what she said, it sounded like a rather unpleasant thing for any child to have. The other woman simply said, "I wish my son had [awful disorder]. You're so lucky--you get free money! Is it contagious? He should come over to play!"

There are people out there who view children's illnesses and injury as potential money, with no thought whatsoever for the children involved. It's absolutely sickening. I don't know about the woman in this story, but it's important to remember that just because something is unthinkable to a normal, caring person, it doesn't mean that it isn't a standard train of thought for others.

While it may be possible, I think ascribing that motivation to a stranger based on nothing more than an online news article reporting on a single event in the woman's life is, at a minimum, impolite.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24565 on: November 28, 2013, 10:13:43 PM »
Whoa, I know this story is raising ire, but I think that's taking it a step too far, Twik. Never once when I have heard the sound of any of my kids heads hitting anything have I ever thought anything other than "Oh my God please let him/her be okay." Whatever her motivation might or might now be now, I think your statement just...goes too far.

Yes, but you're a normal parent, not a scammer.

I'm sure this woman was upset and frightened at the time her child was hurt (at least I hope she was!), but she seems to have quickly moved into "what can I get for this?" territory. I didn't mean to imply it was instantaneous.

Unfortunately, this is possible. And there are some truly horrendous people out there. I was once in line at a bank, and the two women in front of me were chatting. It came up that one of them had a child with some genetic disorder, and (among many more pertinent things) she got a small sum of money every month or so from the government to help manage it. From what she said, it sounded like a rather unpleasant thing for any child to have. The other woman simply said, "I wish my son had [awful disorder]. You're so lucky--you get free money! Is it contagious? He should come over to play!"

There are people out there who view children's illnesses and injury as potential money, with no thought whatsoever for the children involved. It's absolutely sickening. I don't know about the woman in this story, but it's important to remember that just because something is unthinkable to a normal, caring person, it doesn't mean that it isn't a standard train of thought for others.

I had someone tell me I should try to get disability for my ADD so I wouldn't have to work and could get money from the government.  I told her "But I COULD work, I just choose not to."
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24566 on: November 29, 2013, 12:04:18 AM »
Whoa, I know this story is raising ire, but I think that's taking it a step too far, Twik. Never once when I have heard the sound of any of my kids heads hitting anything have I ever thought anything other than "Oh my God please let him/her be okay." Whatever her motivation might or might now be now, I think your statement just...goes too far.

Yes, but you're a normal parent, not a scammer.

I'm sure this woman was upset and frightened at the time her child was hurt (at least I hope she was!), but she seems to have quickly moved into "what can I get for this?" territory. I didn't mean to imply it was instantaneous.

Unfortunately, this is possible. And there are some truly horrendous people out there. I was once in line at a bank, and the two women in front of me were chatting. It came up that one of them had a child with some genetic disorder, and (among many more pertinent things) she got a small sum of money every month or so from the government to help manage it. From what she said, it sounded like a rather unpleasant thing for any child to have. The other woman simply said, "I wish my son had [awful disorder]. You're so lucky--you get free money! Is it contagious? He should come over to play!"

There are people out there who view children's illnesses and injury as potential money, with no thought whatsoever for the children involved. It's absolutely sickening. I don't know about the woman in this story, but it's important to remember that just because something is unthinkable to a normal, caring person, it doesn't mean that it isn't a standard train of thought for others.

I had someone tell me I should try to get disability for my ADD so I wouldn't have to work and could get money from the government.  I told her "But I COULD work, I just choose not to."

We've been told that DD1 is probably entitled to disability because of her severe depression and agrophobia and refuse to look into it because we're worried that if she gets income when she's not leaving the house, she never will
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

CrochetFanatic

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24567 on: November 29, 2013, 02:23:30 AM »
I'm telling this story because something similar happened one time when I went to buy yarn, and bought up all of one color.  The wave of Déjà vu almost knocked me down.

A few days ago, I went to the craft store to pick up two cross stitch bookmarks and five different shades each of blue and purple.  I had decided to change the color of the rose design on the bookmark; my mom wanted purple, and I prefer blue.  There were only two bookmarks left.  There was a woman in the aisle, but she was way at the other end of it, looking at something else.  No one was showing interest in the bookmarks, so I took them and went to pick out the embroidery floss.  The woman saw that I had the last two bookmarks, gave me a dirty look, and muttered, "Greedy..."

I pretended I hadn't heard her.  If she was looking at the bookmarks, I wouldn't have touched them. 

Margo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24568 on: November 29, 2013, 07:51:32 AM »
Wow! I could understand the comment if there had been 45 and and you'd taken them all (although it would still have been rude!) but 2?

wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24569 on: November 29, 2013, 08:05:24 AM »
Brown Thursday Sales Special Snowflakes.

For the most part, our Walmart had a relatively quiet sales evening, but there are a few stories I heard, or witnessed.

The person who thought they were going to just take something, I think it was a DVD player, and not wait in line. SS told coworker that she wasn't going to wait in line, was just going to take what she wanted. Coworker told her she needs to get in the line, and she would not "just take one." The wrath of one person was easier to deal with than an entire line of people who had been waiting for an hour or more.

Special Snowflake I'm Going To Take That Before the Sale Starts, grabbed to sets of head phones and walked off with them. The coworker guarding those chased her down, took them away, and told SS sale starts at 8.

The person, who, even though he received a 1 hour guarantee card, was mad because we were out of TVs and he couldn't get one that minute.

Oh, and finally, the one person who was mad because he had to have his receipt checked.

Thank you, general public, for your good behavior last night.