Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5650892 times)

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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25245 on: January 30, 2014, 05:34:06 AM »
A friend sent me this, I'll just leave it here:

http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kentonline/news/2012/august/20/car_fire.aspx

The first sentence is brilliant.

figee

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25246 on: January 30, 2014, 05:58:53 AM »
A friend sent me this, I'll just leave it here:

http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kentonline/news/2012/august/20/car_fire.aspx

The first sentence is brilliant.

You have just caused DHs brain to hurt. 

snowfire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25247 on: January 30, 2014, 10:37:20 AM »

Isn't that the point of the static strap that hangs at the back of every car?

You know, the black strap underneath, often hangs near a tow hitch or tow ball. They come standard on all cars.

Don't they . . . . . . ?

I've never seen them on passenger cars, or even commercial vehicles except for fire trucks or power company trucks.

goldilocks

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25248 on: January 30, 2014, 11:33:20 AM »
New guy at work.

We have a large fridge in the break room where you can store anything you want.  We also have a much, much smaller fridge in our office area.  Its the size of a dorm fridge.  Typically, every night before I leave I put 2 bottles of coke in there to have the next day.  Others do the same.   

Last night I went to put my cokes in and found that the new guy had completely loaded the fridge with his drinks, leaving no room for anyone else.   There was at least 12 in there.   As he was already gone, I removed all but 2 and put mine in there.

He was quite upset when he came in the next day.  ( I wasn't around).  The other manager told him that we all had to share that fridge, and why on earth did he think he could load it up with his drinks.   He told her he didnt' know he shouldn't do that.

Really?   You don't know that a shared fridge isn't just for you?   

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25249 on: January 30, 2014, 12:05:49 PM »
A great firsthand account of some special snowflakes in the current Atlanta snowpocolypse.

Here's a hint: if there's a hill in the road, and the locals put traffic cones at the top when it snows and a sign saying DO NOT USE THIS HILL, and they all pull out lawn chairs and have a cookout to watch over and help out the eight other cars which have already slid off the road while attempting to use the hill (despite the cones and the signs), a smart person would not drive on that hill.  Apparently not everyone is that smart.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25250 on: January 30, 2014, 12:15:40 PM »
A great firsthand account of some special snowflakes in the current Atlanta snowpocolypse.

Here's a hint: if there's a hill in the road, and the locals put traffic cones at the top when it snows and a sign saying DO NOT USE THIS HILL, and they all pull out lawn chairs and have a cookout to watch over and help out the eight other cars which have already slid off the road while attempting to use the hill (despite the cones and the signs), a smart person would not drive on that hill.  Apparently not everyone is that smart.

I'm a northern girl.  I know how to drive in snow and ice.  But I also know to heed local warnings and if it's really bad, I just don't bother going out.

Where I grew up, there was a brutal hill on the road out to our place.  Our bus was often cancelled when practically every other bus in the district would still be running.  We got used to it.  If it was really bad, there was an alternate route that took about 4 times as long so we didn't take it very often.  One morning, it was so bad that people were using the turn around at the bottom of our driveway to turn around and go back home.  My Mom was in her car to head out for work when a neighbour pulled in.  'Yo, Mrs. Jones, where are you heading,' and when Mom told him what she was doing, he said, 'No, I don't think you are.  You need to go right back inside and phone everyone to tell them you aren't going to make it.'  Now my Mom didn't take kindly to people telling her what to do but she took one look at his face and decided to do exactly what he said.  In fact, she invited him in for coffee.  We had so many people stop in our driveway that day that we joked about putting up a sign:  Coffee and a hot tub - 5 bucks

That photo and the party on the sidelines just reminded me of that day.  I love impromptu neighbourhood parties like that.
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Ontario

EMuir

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25251 on: January 30, 2014, 12:18:21 PM »
For those who don't want to view the video of the man setting his wife on fire... I don't think it was special snowflake. It looks like he deliberately held his lighter to the gas, he wasn't just playing with it. In fact, his wife was ok until even AFTER that point, until he intervened. Which is why he's looking at jail.

o_gal

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25252 on: January 30, 2014, 01:23:33 PM »
A great firsthand account of some special snowflakes in the current Atlanta snowpocolypse.

Here's a hint: if there's a hill in the road, and the locals put traffic cones at the top when it snows and a sign saying DO NOT USE THIS HILL, and they all pull out lawn chairs and have a cookout to watch over and help out the eight other cars which have already slid off the road while attempting to use the hill (despite the cones and the signs), a smart person would not drive on that hill.  Apparently not everyone is that smart.

Then there's Canton Ave in the suburbs of Pittsburgh: http://www.wired.com/autopia/2010/12/the-steepest-road-on-earth-takes-no-prisoners/

There are actual permanent street signs (or at least there were a few years ago), that tell you not to drive down the road at any time. Cobblestones and a 37% grade do not make for a good road even in sunny clear weather. But every year, they get idiots who want to take it on as a challenge. I think the residents pick them up in heaps at the bottom when they don't make it  >:D

(DH has done the Pittsburgh Dirty Dozen 3 times - 1st time did not make it up because he did not believe Danny about the grade, 2nd time did not make it up because he forgot to order the mega-chain ring he wanted, 3rd time finally made it up with the mega-chain ring  :D )

SCMagnolia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25253 on: January 30, 2014, 03:05:36 PM »
Quote
Cobblestones and a 37% grade do not make for a good road even in sunny clear weather.

I remember being at a track tour of Bristol Speedway.  The track is banked 37 degrees in the turns there - it's what makes it the world's fastest half-mile racetrack.  They said that when cars wreck in the turns and get stuck against the wall thanks to centrifugal force, the rescue folks would have to tie a rope around their waists and go over the outside retaining wall at the top of the track (with someone on the outside of the track holding the rope) to help the driver because it was nearly impossible to stand up on the banking and work on removing the car and assisting the driver.

I could lay on the outside retaining wall (which was angled inward) and touch the surface of the track, that's how steep the banking is!

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25254 on: January 30, 2014, 03:14:59 PM »
There's a street in New Zealand that's officially recognised as the worlds steepest. Once a year they roll jaffas down the hill for charity.

http://chocolatecarnival.co.nz/jaffa_race

If you don't know what a Jaffa is, that page explains.

wheeitsme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25255 on: January 30, 2014, 04:30:01 PM »
Ah.  The one in Pittsburgh has a grade of 37% and is shorter by about half.  The one in New Zealand has a grade of 38% and is longer.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25256 on: January 30, 2014, 04:37:32 PM »
Are things rolled down it?

Coruscation

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25257 on: January 30, 2014, 04:49:32 PM »
I don't know about the mainland, but here on this island, I notice a static shock when I slide out of my seat and touch the car door.  There are signs in front of the pumps saying to be sure to touch the door and discharge the static charge before pumping.  Since I can't seem to exit my car without discharging that static charge, I don't worry, but I could definitely see that as a danger if one were pumping the gas and touched the gas cap cover (which is metal on my car).  I guess worse would be if you had a fiberglass chassis which doesn't discharge the static.  Then you better touch something metal before you pump gas.

One of my friends used to be responsible for assuring the quality of government-purchased aviation fuel. He told me that just the friction involved in flowing fuel into a tank can build up a sizeable static charge, so it was mandatory to ground each aircraft (usually with a steel chain that touched the ground) while fueling. I'm guessing this might apply to cars, too.

I'm sure I've seen a show which said that more fires in petrol stations are caused by static, particularly from women with long skirts or dresses, than cigarettes. It's the kind of odd fact which sticks with you.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25258 on: January 30, 2014, 11:10:44 PM »
For those who don't want to view the video of the man setting his wife on fire... I don't think it was special snowflake. It looks like he deliberately held his lighter to the gas, he wasn't just playing with it. In fact, his wife was ok until even AFTER that point, until he intervened. Which is why he's looking at jail.

I agree, it looked awfully deliberate to me.  Both flicking the lighter *and* pulling the hose right out of the car and turning it towards her.  Now, I could be wrong, I know people do plenty of stupid things when they panic, but it *looked* very intentional.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25259 on: January 30, 2014, 11:13:56 PM »
I don't know about the mainland, but here on this island, I notice a static shock when I slide out of my seat and touch the car door.  There are signs in front of the pumps saying to be sure to touch the door and discharge the static charge before pumping.  Since I can't seem to exit my car without discharging that static charge, I don't worry, but I could definitely see that as a danger if one were pumping the gas and touched the gas cap cover (which is metal on my car).  I guess worse would be if you had a fiberglass chassis which doesn't discharge the static.  Then you better touch something metal before you pump gas.

One of my friends used to be responsible for assuring the quality of government-purchased aviation fuel. He told me that just the friction involved in flowing fuel into a tank can build up a sizeable static charge, so it was mandatory to ground each aircraft (usually with a steel chain that touched the ground) while fueling. I'm guessing this might apply to cars, too.

I'm sure I've seen a show which said that more fires in petrol stations are caused by static, particularly from women with long skirts or dresses, than cigarettes. It's the kind of odd fact which sticks with you.

I don't know if it's enough to cause a fire, but twice lately I have gotten a painful shock from static electricity.  Once was when I went to flick the lock switch of my car door as I was exiting the vehicle.  That was bad.  And then flicking a light switch in a bedroom in our house--that one hurt to high heaven and my arm ached for an hour afterwards.  There was a significant spark, too.  I actually initially thought that something was wrong with the electrical system and it had given me a shock, it was that bad.

Especially given that the first one was from leaving a car, I could totally see a spark like that causing a fire.  At the same time, I don't *ever* remember getting a shock that bad from a car in my life, so I'd imagine it's not all that common.