Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5238907 times)

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bopper

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25530 on: February 13, 2014, 02:55:47 PM »


Jersey Girl here...the first time you have to pump gas I assure you that you are convinced that you are convinced you are going to blow everything up!   Also our gas is cheapter and you don't have to pump it..I can see why one would not want to have to pay more to pump it yourself!

Only me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25531 on: February 13, 2014, 03:02:47 PM »
Not sure who the SS is, but I'm guessing him. :)

I drive my roommate to work and back at least 4 of 5 days. We've been rooming together for about 10 years. He has always automatically gotten out to pump the gas when I say I need some. Except this winter, its just been so cold. Afte the first snow fall I stopped for gas and then just sat there, well so did he. I had to ask him if he was pumping gas and got "its your car". So out I got, and so did he to clean the windows.

Really and he wonders why he's not married  ???

SCMagnolia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25532 on: February 13, 2014, 03:03:18 PM »
Quote
Also our gas is cheapter and you don't have to pump it..I can see why one would not want to have to pay more to pump it yourself!

Here in PA -- and probably in most other states where there might be an option of full-serve vs. self-serve -- full service is more!

The reason our gas is so expensive here in PA isn't because of the self-serve option, it's because of the ridiculous gas taxes.

gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25533 on: February 13, 2014, 03:04:33 PM »
... I had to ask him if he was pumping gas and got "its your car". So out I got, and so did he to clean the windows. ...

"It's your car."

"And it's your ride!"
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 03:06:09 PM by gramma dishes »

AfleetAlex

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25534 on: February 13, 2014, 03:13:38 PM »
I taught my mom how to pump gas. Actually I insisted she learn. When I was growing up she always said the deal was Dad would fill the gas tank (he worked and she didn't during our early years), and I do remember over the years times when she was freaking out about being low on gas and yelling at my dad about it once she finally made it home (which in turn upset us kids). It wasn't that she didn't have the money, it's that she didn't want to learn how to pump gas - that was Dad's job.

So when I learned to drive, I made her get out of the car and watch me pump gas so she would know how to do it and not get stranded somewhere. She does it now, especially since she has her own car and Dad has his.

It may be a generational thing, and I admit I am an SS about this toward her, but her occasional chosen lack of independence both aggravates me AND has made me very self-sufficient.
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25535 on: February 13, 2014, 03:24:24 PM »
The officer asked Kathy if she wanted to press charges, but she said no. She was so rattled by the whole thing, she just couldn't bear seeing the idiot again. It makes me mad even thinking about it >:(!

How horrible for her!  >:( :o

I understand her reasoning but it's a shame Kathy didn't press charges. Having to face consequences for his actions might have helped him. If he decides to get unreasonably infuriated enough to do that to someone who was looking for trouble, the results could be disastrous.

I'd press charges, too. A driver who's mad enough to do that is a menace on the road!

I don't understand this "Kathy gets to decide whether to press charges." It's not Kathy's law; it's the state's law, it's "the people's" law; that's why criminal cases are "The People of the State of Idaho vs. ..."

The question should be, "Will you sign a statement or otherwise cooperate if we pursue charges?"

Kathy is not a complainant; she's a witness and a victim. Of course the prosecution doesn't want to go to all the trouble if their main witness is going to refuse to cooperate.

This actually makes me mad, this sort of thing. Individual victims don't "press charges"; the people of their state do, via the governmental prosecutors.

Fi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25536 on: February 13, 2014, 06:20:28 PM »
Depends on where you are. Both DH and I have told the police we're quite happy to press charges if the police wish to do so. In DH's case, local kids were explicitly told what ciuld have happened to them and have never been a problem since; in my case, bloke's sentence (no jail) involved treatment for his addiction. I had the bonus of the copper taking my statement stop dead and say "my wife is from where you are. You 'looked' at him. I almost feel sorry for him."

Mind you, the best possible circumstances to give a police statement is when you and the officer are both rolling your eyes.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 07:09:44 PM by Fi »

Sebastienne

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25537 on: February 13, 2014, 06:36:25 PM »
I do have to say that, as a Jersey girl, my first time pumping gas out of state was pretty intimidating. It wasn't just the pumping part (and being convinced I was going to blow up the Mobil station), but I only had cash, and I had no idea how to pay! What if I gave them $20 and I only need $18 in my tank? What if I gave them $20, and I put $21 in my tank? Seriously, the mechanics of a self-serve gas station were confounding.

I've lived out of state for 15 years now, and I still only pay for gas with a card...
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 06:55:51 PM by Sebastienne »

Miss March

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25538 on: February 13, 2014, 06:39:33 PM »
I remember being confused the first time I drove a new car and I went to pump my gas and I couldn't flip the tank cover open. It was completely smooth! How was I supposed to pull it ajar so I could fill the gas tank? Luckily for me, a kind person saw my dilemma and explained to me that many cars now have buttons on the interior that you need to press in order to open the gas tank cover.  ::)  Boy, did I feel dumb.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2014, 12:04:07 PM by Miss March »
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MrTango

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25539 on: February 13, 2014, 06:47:11 PM »
The officer asked Kathy if she wanted to press charges, but she said no. She was so rattled by the whole thing, she just couldn't bear seeing the idiot again. It makes me mad even thinking about it >:(!

How horrible for her!  >:( :o

I understand her reasoning but it's a shame Kathy didn't press charges. Having to face consequences for his actions might have helped him. If he decides to get unreasonably infuriated enough to do that to someone who was looking for trouble, the results could be disastrous.

I'd press charges, too. A driver who's mad enough to do that is a menace on the road!

I don't understand this "Kathy gets to decide whether to press charges." It's not Kathy's law; it's the state's law, it's "the people's" law; that's why criminal cases are "The People of the State of Idaho vs. ..."

The question should be, "Will you sign a statement or otherwise cooperate if we pursue charges?"

Kathy is not a complainant; she's a witness and a victim. Of course the prosecution doesn't want to go to all the trouble if their main witness is going to refuse to cooperate.

This actually makes me mad, this sort of thing. Individual victims don't "press charges"; the people of their state do, via the governmental prosecutors.

I agree that "pressing charges" can be poor wording, but since the state has the burden of proof, they aren't going to pursue charges unless they think they can count on the cooperation of the victim.  Trying to get a conviction without the cooperation of the victim (unless, of course, there's video of the crime being committed) is virtually impossible, and therefore the state usually sees it as a waste of money.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25540 on: February 13, 2014, 07:47:09 PM »
I do have to say that, as a Jersey girl, my first time pumping gas out of state was pretty intimidating. It wasn't just the pumping part (and being convinced I was going to blow up the Mobil station), but I only had cash, and I had no idea how to pay! What if I gave them $20 and I only need $18 in my tank? What if I gave them $20, and I put $21 in my tank? Seriously, the mechanics of a self-serve gas station were confounding.

I've lived out of state for 15 years now, and I still only pay for gas with a card...

I still hate paying in cash for this very reason  :P  I always end up putting in less than I think I'll need ($20 versus "filling it all the way" like I would with a credit card) because I hate the idea of having to go inside more than once!

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25541 on: February 13, 2014, 08:22:04 PM »
For those who didn't know how to open their gas tank and other things about pumping gas. In the Late 70's Mom got a new to her car. We were driving somewhere and it got dark. She turned on the lights and they were on high. She felt for that button on the floor with her foot and couldn't find it. She pulled off onto a residential road. Got out and was looking on the floor for the button.

At this point I jumped over the seat and showed her how to turn them off. The strange thing was Dad's car had the newer turn the brights on by flicking the stem from the column thing, and she drove that car.

The stonecold and the freezing weather reminded me of this one.

Late 90's San Angelo ISD got a new superintendent from up north.
First he freaks out about the kids going out to recess in 100+ weather. It is August in West Texas. He doesn't want them outside till it hits the 80's - what no recess, PE, or FOOTBALL (bow your head) till October. The board gets him over that hump.

Then came the ice storm. Everyone is sure the world is ending - and he refuses to close the schools. TexDOT has ordered people to stay off the road but he is sending the buses out because this is nothing and what is going to happen when winter really hits. The buses don't have to travel on the freeway/bridges. They can stick to the surface roads. There are few roads without bridges in San Angelo. They aren't big honking up in the sky bridges. They are little bitty low water crossing - over dry creek beds. But rain and temps below 32 those things freeze FAST. You got cold air and rain on top, you got cold air and dry creek bed below. The road is sandwiched in sub freezing air. 

Now I've noticed that if you aren't raised around low water bridges you don't see them - especially if they are over a dry creek bed. http://goo.gl/W6UurM shows what I'm talking about - except it is flooded.
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PastryGoddess

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25542 on: February 13, 2014, 08:55:53 PM »
That is a BRIDGE???   :o

LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25543 on: February 13, 2014, 09:10:16 PM »
Quote
My dad taught me to change a tire as a condition of learning to drive.

I had to do this too, as a condition of getting my license.   Along with learning to check all the fluids, change the oil, rotate the tires, and other basic maintenance things.   Dad's a mechanic.  He taught my sister and I this stuff for two reasons:  One, he won't always be around and he didn't want some less-than-honest person taking advantage of us when we needed our cars worked on, and two, he wanted very self-sufficient daughters. 

I think he succeeded.   Sissy and I now do most all our basic maintenance (oil changes, brakes, tire rotations, etc.) ourselves.  Dad will help, just because he likes working on cars with his girls, and because he has all the really good tools!

He also taught both of us that when we did rotate tires, to hand-tighten the lug nuts.  If the lug nuts are tightened all the way with an air wrench, they are next to impossible to break loose with just that tire-iron tool they give you with your spare.  It's not much good knowing how to change a tire if you can't get the lug nuts loose to get the tire off in the first place!

And as a hint, on most new cars, if you look at the gas gauge on the dash, there is a little arrow or triangle next to it pointing either left or right.   That tells you which side of the car the tank is on.

Ditto. As soon as I got my permit, I had to learn to drive a standard, rotate tires, do a basic oil change and tune up, and pump gas. And I had to learn on all of the family's cars. Dad had a full size van, mom had a Blazer, sis had a buick (can't remember what it was), and I had a 72 Impala. Pretty wide range to learn on. No drivers license allowed until I had done all of that.
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VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25544 on: February 13, 2014, 09:22:21 PM »
We left San Angelo in 1992, never to return to live there (knock on mesquite, live oak, or pecan wood) - VorGuy's parents and sister's family live there.  We visit.

Seriously, folks, in college in the 1970s, 1/4" (yes, that is one quarter of an inch) of snow caused accidents as people spun out of control on icy streets.

There were no snow tires in town - certainly no one around the college was using any, the few snow shovels had been brought by accident when moving from "up north" or were gotten as gag gifts (a joke). 

No one knew how to drive on snow - especially not the little 18 year old college freshman who hit our new red Pinto (only time I remember getting a brand new car - it was an accident magnet, I swear) when she spun out of control trying NOT to hit someone slowing to make a turn in front of her - no traction meant no control.

Students were walking in the snow because it was less likely to cause slips & falls than trying to walk on sidewalks frozen as slick as glass...I was one of them! 

There were a lot of us from the area who hadn't seen snow in eight years or so.  And there was no sand, salt, or snowplows closer than a six or eight hour drive due north in warm weather (meaning you could go fast, not creep along on snow covered roads). 

I remember one of the dry creek beds flooding and there was a foot of water washing over the "bridge" at a park as well as under the bridge - they had to install a new bridge later that year, as it washed out....the area is "semi-arid".  And windy - so wind chill will freeze any available moisture a lot faster than you might think it would.
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