Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5238019 times)

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Bluenomi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25695 on: February 27, 2014, 08:19:43 PM »
For every baby who is in tiny clothes for ages there is one who lasts in them for maybe a week. The problem is knowing which baby is which!

zyrs

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25696 on: February 27, 2014, 08:28:45 PM »
Ar thread in the 'family and children' section reminded me of this story.

We moved to a new city when I was about 5 and my mother wanted to be friends with the mother of a female child about the same age who lived in our neighborhood.  I knew the girl from school and did not like her at all.  I am male, and at that time had a fairly neat room, because I really do like everything in its place.

Mom invited the girl to our house to play...

The girl went through my dresser drawers and threw all my clothing onto the floor, tossed a bunch of my things around, broke some of them and then demanded that I give her others.  I couldn't stop her from doing any of this - asking her not to didn't work and I knew that I wasn't supposed to touch or hit her - all I could do was refuse to give her the things she demanded.

So then she went out, told my mom I was being a bad host and went home.

Mom was already angry about my being a poor host, so when she came in and saw the state of my room she got even angrier - how dare I make a mess and break my stuff and then lie about "perfect neighbor girl" being the one to do so. 

From then on, mom thought of me as a messy liar.  The only good thing about it was she felt so embarrassed at how horrible I was that she never invited 'perfect neighbor girl" over to the house again.

The special snowflakiest part?  Perfect neighbor girl couldn't understand why I was not interested in her when we got into Junior High and High School.
So for years and years, before AND after Perfect's visit, the condition of your room wasn't evident?  Did your mother think that you did all that all the time, and just stuffed everything under the bed before she came in?

Pretty much.

BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25697 on: February 27, 2014, 09:40:35 PM »
Ar thread in the 'family and children' section reminded me of this story.

We moved to a new city when I was about 5 and my mother wanted to be friends with the mother of a female child about the same age who lived in our neighborhood.  I knew the girl from school and did not like her at all.  I am male, and at that time had a fairly neat room, because I really do like everything in its place.

Mom invited the girl to our house to play...

The girl went through my dresser drawers and threw all my clothing onto the floor, tossed a bunch of my things around, broke some of them and then demanded that I give her others.  I couldn't stop her from doing any of this - asking her not to didn't work and I knew that I wasn't supposed to touch or hit her - all I could do was refuse to give her the things she demanded.

So then she went out, told my mom I was being a bad host and went home.

Mom was already angry about my being a poor host, so when she came in and saw the state of my room she got even angrier - how dare I make a mess and break my stuff and then lie about "perfect neighbor girl" being the one to do so. 

From then on, mom thought of me as a messy liar.  The only good thing about it was she felt so embarrassed at how horrible I was that she never invited 'perfect neighbor girl" over to the house again.

The special snowflakiest part?  Perfect neighbor girl couldn't understand why I was not interested in her when we got into Junior High and High School.
So for years and years, before AND after Perfect's visit, the condition of your room wasn't evident?  Did your mother think that you did all that all the time, and just stuffed everything under the bed before she came in?

Pretty much.

Did you ever set her straight about the neighbor girl and the damage to your room?

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25698 on: February 27, 2014, 10:35:46 PM »

When giving clothes as a shower gift, I go for the larger sizes.  Eventualy the kid will grow into it.

Everyone does. I got no really small things when my daughter was born.

I always figure that, in a pinch, a baby can wear larger clothes.  But not smaller.  It did drive me crazy when they were little in large clothes, though, and they'd bring their feet up to their chest and the legs would come out of the leg holes.  So you'd be carrying your child and she'd look like a tiny double amputee, sleeper legs dangling.  It didn't seem to bother her much, though.

zyrs

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25699 on: February 28, 2014, 02:07:27 AM »

Did you ever set her straight about the neighbor girl and the damage to your room?

I told her what happened at the time.  She decided I was lying.  Once my mother decides something is the truth, she will not change her mind about it.


BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25700 on: February 28, 2014, 09:20:40 AM »

Did you ever set her straight about the neighbor girl and the damage to your room?

I told her what happened at the time.  She decided I was lying.  Once my mother decides something is the truth, she will not change her mind about it.

I meant to say, as an adult?

There were a number of things that I had to tell my mother about her "church friends" and how they treated me.  She didn't believe me as a child, but when I told her again once as an adult, she realized I was telling the truth and apologized.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25701 on: February 28, 2014, 10:38:30 AM »
^ My mother doesn't believe anything negative about anyone but her children. And I am 45 years old.

gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25702 on: February 28, 2014, 10:46:24 AM »

Did you ever set her straight about the neighbor girl and the damage to your room?

I told her what happened at the time.  She decided I was lying.  Once my mother decides something is the truth, she will not change her mind about it.

I have a suspicion that your Mom saw the girl's mother as a potential very desirable friend (for whatever reason) and might not have wanted to admit to herself that that friendship never materialized in quite the way she had imagined or hoped for because the other mother simply didn't want it.   So YOU must be to blame for mistreating her potential friend's "sweet" daughter.

Lorelei_Evil

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25703 on: February 28, 2014, 11:43:53 AM »
POD.  She was trying to score points with the mother, and you got blamed when it didn't work out the way she planned. 

Been there.

zyrs

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25704 on: February 28, 2014, 06:48:09 PM »

Did you ever set her straight about the neighbor girl and the damage to your room?

I told her what happened at the time.  She decided I was lying.  Once my mother decides something is the truth, she will not change her mind about it.

I meant to say, as an adult?

There were a number of things that I had to tell my mother about her "church friends" and how they treated me.  She didn't believe me as a child, but when I told her again once as an adult, she realized I was telling the truth and apologized.

My mother will not change her mind once she has decided something is the truth.  Over the years I have found that it's better to just let things go and mentally roll my eyes.

The only reason I even remembered "perfect female child" was a follow up comment an OP had in a thread in the "family and children" section.

Dawse

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25705 on: March 01, 2014, 07:24:00 AM »
Youse guys are gonna LOVE this.

I live in a terraced house, with some on-street parking, and more room in a little 'car park' area at the end of the road. Usually, the on-street parking is taken up by about six in the evening, but pretty empty during the day, and there's always loads of room in the car park area. The car park area is less than thirty seconds walk from my front door, and there are only two houses further away from it than us, resulting in a maximum walking time of I would guess around forty seconds. You will need to know this to appreciate the SS-ness.

Last week, on my day off, someone knocks on my door mid-afternoon. I'd worked the day before, so had got up late and hadn't got dressed yet - I still had pajamas and slippers on - but slung a dressing gown on and went to answer the door. On the other side, there's a man - I'd guess around 35, in jeans and a blazer - looking surly. He asks (rudely!) 'Is your car parked on the street?' (Unusually for that time of day, there were several cars parked in front of houses, although there was still room for a couple on the end of the row - I looked afterwards.)

I'm a bit taken aback, so I ask why. He repeats, still rude, 'Is your car parked on the street?' I figure at this point, maybe a rogue bin has attacked someone's car or someone's left a window open in the rain and he's just trying to let someone know, even if he's not doing it very nicely, so I say 'Yes, why?'

He says, 'You need to move it.' I'm seriously wondering what on earth is going on now, and I'm certainly not going to anything this very rude man is telling - not asking, telling - me to do without a very good explanation. I channel the polite spine spirit of Ehell, and say as politely as I can manage, 'Why do I need to move my car?'

This is the bit where I had to restrain myself from laughing. His reply, still surly: 'It's raining and my mother doesn't want to walk from the parking area in the rain.' I'm so surprised I blurt 'excuse me?' without really thinking, and he repeats himself - 'My mother doesn't want to walk that far in the rain. You need to move your car so I can park there.' I say, 'I'm sorry, I can't help you' and shut the door.

I mean, REALLY?!?! There are so many things wrong with this my brain hurts. I didn't recognize this guy AT ALL, and I know most of my neighbours by sight at least, so I'm assuming they were visiting someone - but who goes knocking on doors in the middle of the afternoon (or at all, really) with this kind of demand? Your mother doesn't want to walk thirty seconds in the rain, so you want ME to go out of my house in the rain, move my car, and then walk back to my house in the same rain your mother has such a dread of? IN MY PAJAMAS AND DRESSING GOWN? I don't think so, buddy. She's not going to dissolve.

And, as I mentioned, there WAS still some on-street parking left. Plus, he doesn't know which one my car is - for all he knows it's the furthest away from where they want to be. The entitlement, it boggles.


Edited because I can spell, promise.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2014, 07:34:05 AM by Dawse »
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sevenday

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25706 on: March 01, 2014, 10:24:44 AM »
Mr. Wicked Witch of the West could have brought his car to his mother, unless she is disabled enough to require assistance moving from house to car.  I have seen plenty of situations in grocery stores - person emerges, stands in the little covered area, and waits.  A car pulls out and stops in front of them.  Person dashes out and quickly stuffs bags into the trunk, then gets in the passenger seat - gone in a minute.  When my parents come to pick me up to take me to a function, they pull up out front and don't even park - they know I'm watching and will come right out.  I go out, lock the door, go down the ramp and get into their van - gone in a minute.  Of course, I'm fairly mobile.  This... person's... mother might have a walker, wheelchair, etc.  Even so, surely he can park in front/behind your car (so, down one parking space)?  By your description I can't imagine it was wall to wall cars on the street.  Or perhaps he could... GASP! ... walk with his mother and hold her umbrella.  LOOK! NO RAIN!  IT'S A MIRACLE!

BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25707 on: March 01, 2014, 11:21:36 AM »
I have been Mr. Wicked Witch of the West.  Hear me out, though:

After my dad died, Mom gave his car to my sister.  She allowed the neighbor family to park one of their numerous vehicles in her driveway, to give the appearance of someone being home.  Unfortunately, they also parked in front of her house and every other house in the neighborhood.  When I took my mother grocery shopping, we'd come home to her driveway and every other parking spot on the block taken by this family's vehicles.  The street was unfortunately so narrow that to double-park would completely block traffic.  So yes, I was a bit surly when I had to help my elderly mother and her several bags of groceries walk an entire city block.

At that point, I told my mother that she needed to rescind permission for them to park in the driveway.  Didn't stop them, though, so I had to call police on them several times.

Dawse

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25708 on: March 01, 2014, 06:22:42 PM »
Mr. Wicked Witch of the West could have brought his car to his mother, unless she is disabled enough to require assistance moving from house to car.  I have seen plenty of situations in grocery stores - person emerges, stands in the little covered area, and waits.  A car pulls out and stops in front of them.  Person dashes out and quickly stuffs bags into the trunk, then gets in the passenger seat - gone in a minute.  When my parents come to pick me up to take me to a function, they pull up out front and don't even park - they know I'm watching and will come right out.  I go out, lock the door, go down the ramp and get into their van - gone in a minute.  Of course, I'm fairly mobile.  This... person's... mother might have a walker, wheelchair, etc.  Even so, surely he can park in front/behind your car (so, down one parking space)?  By your description I can't imagine it was wall to wall cars on the street.  Or perhaps he could... GASP! ... walk with his mother and hold her umbrella.  LOOK! NO RAIN!  IT'S A MIRACLE!

That was what I was thinking to myself, too - ours is a dead end road, very quiet especially in the middle of the day, so even if he'd double parked to unload his mother, I doubt he'd have caused a hold up.

And you know what? If he'd asked, very politely, with lots of 'please' and 'thank you' and 'sorry to bother you' if I would mind moving my car up to a different parking space as his elderly mother has trouble walking - I probably would have done it.

I did think about offering him an umbrella, but decided I probably wouldn't get it back  ;D
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BB-VA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25709 on: March 01, 2014, 06:33:01 PM »
At the baby shower when I was pg with my eldest, I got a LOT of outfits for 3-6, 6-9 months and my aunts told me that he wouldn't be in the newborn stuff very long and their children seemed to pop out fitting into the 3-6 already.  Ironically, first Piratechild was swimming in the newborn outfits and it took a while before I could stop rolling up the pants of the 0-3 months clothes, mostly cause the child was long in the torso and had very short legs.

He's now closing in on 13, with very long legs and nearly as tall as I am (5'2")

One of my nieces was born wearing *doll clothes* (1-lb preemie), and now at age 14, she's as tall as I am.(5'8")  Her twin sister is even taller.    Yup,we grow them TALL in my family.

As an interesting note, I made clothes for the girls when they were young, and that one wore the SAME SIZE from age 2 to age 6.  She just kept getting taller those years.  It was very odd.

My daughter was kind of like that too.  Just got taller, but didn't fill out much.  She had a couple of cute little A-line type dresses (no waistline) that I used for dressy tops with pants for her for several years. 
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