Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5297438 times)

1 Member and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

audhs

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1819
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25740 on: March 05, 2014, 04:55:27 PM »
The coaches were just tired. 

I have to admit: I hate hearing this excuse.

If you are supervising children in a public place, then you need to supervise the children.  It doesn't matter how tired you are, and it doesn't matter how high-energy the children are.  If you bring children into a public place, they're your responsibility.

I was thinking the same thing. 


gramma dishes

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8060
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25741 on: March 05, 2014, 08:36:43 PM »
The coaches were just tired. 

I have to admit: I hate hearing this excuse.

If you are supervising children in a public place, then you need to supervise the children.  It doesn't matter how tired you are, and it doesn't matter how high-energy the children are.  If you bring children into a public place, they're your responsibility.

I was thinking the same thing.

Sometimes all it takes is a statement of your expectations IN ADVANCE.

You say
"Look kids.  We're so pleased with how hard you're trying and you're doing a great job, so we've decided to take you out for ice cream.  Here is how it is going to go. 
We will walk in together. 
We will line up.  Coach A will be at the beginning of the line and I (Coach B) will be at the end. 
Each person makes their ice cream choice quickly and orders, then the next person in line. 
As soon as you have ordered you will go over *there* to wait for your ice cream. 
As soon as you have your ice cream you go sit down and stay there. 
When everyone has finished we will go out to the cars together as a group. 
Whether or not we ever do this again will depend on how well you are able to follow these rules today."

Usually the results are pretty good if the children know with certainty what is expected of them and that there will be future consequences if the are unable/unwilling to comply.

LOL, I had forgotten how much I did this when I was teaching and then again as a mother of young children.   ;D

LadyDyani

  • Freelance Editor
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 502
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25742 on: March 05, 2014, 08:44:44 PM »
Bittybartfast finally managed (after many failed attempts over the last several months) to break the screen on my iPad yesterday, so I took it down to the Apple store to see what they could do.  (The answer was not much, but they "repair" it by trading it in for an identical replacement.)  I joked with the employee about how I hated to do that because I didn't want to lose all my progress in the games I had on there, and they probably heard that all the time.

She said she had a guy come in just the previous day absolutely foaming at the mouth because his iPhone said he was on level 236 of Candy Crush, but his Facebook account said he was on level 272, and what did she propose to do about it?  Apparently it took three employees to convince him that frontline employees at a physical location of an Apple store weren't the ones to yell at when you have Candy Crush/Facebook problems . . .

Wow. That guy left a review. I was looking at the reviews the other day because I was having a problem with Candy Crush, and I wanted to see if anyone else was having the same problem. I came across a review that was complaining about level 236 on the phone, but 272 on Facebook.

He gave them one star.
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

VorFemme

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12787
  • Strolls with scissors! Too tired to run today!
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25743 on: March 05, 2014, 08:55:00 PM »
English also produces hybrid words by fraternizing with the other language....it doesn't care which way it gets new words....and new rules of spelling, punctuation, and grammar.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11664
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25744 on: March 05, 2014, 09:07:36 PM »
I nominate the ladies sitting behind me in church this evening.  It was the Ash Wednesday service, which includes a fairly long bit in the middle where the pastor draws a cross with ash on each person's forehead.  It's done in silence, and it took a while because it was a pretty full service.  You're supposed to pray or think quietly while it's going on.

The ladies behind me kept up a running commentary the whole time.  And I suspect one or both of them don't hear as well as they used to, because they were nowhere near as quiet as they probably thought they were.  They weren't saying anything particularly unkind, per se, but it was definitely an "inner monologue" kind of conversation.  ("Oh, I love what she did with her hair!  Didn't she used to have it red?  The silver streaks suit her.  Wow, her son really got taller - is he in college now?  Ooh, is that his girlfriend with him?  Marge said she thought Ron looked better in red, but he's had that blue vest forever and I don't see any reason he should have to stop wearing it now."  Etc. etc. etc.)

Unfortunately there was no way to let them know everyone could hear them  :-\

wonderfullyanonymous

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2571
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25745 on: March 05, 2014, 10:21:11 PM »
The coaches were just tired. 

I have to admit: I hate hearing this excuse.

If you are supervising children in a public place, then you need to supervise the children.  It doesn't matter how tired you are, and it doesn't matter how high-energy the children are.  If you bring children into a public place, they're your responsibility.

This is a cop out.  My BFF and I were a leader and co leader for a Cub scout den of kids in a school no one else wanted to deal with. Our kids were ADHD, some had behavioral problems.  Along with my BFFs older son, we had her younger son, my DD, my ODS and later YDS. All of these kids knew how to behave, and always behaved accordingly when we were in public any where. There were always glitches, but usually a look from us stopped the bad behavior before it escalated.

TeamBhakta

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2571
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25746 on: March 05, 2014, 10:39:55 PM »
The coaches were just tired. 

I have to admit: I hate hearing this excuse.

If you are supervising children in a public place, then you need to supervise the children.  It doesn't matter how tired you are, and it doesn't matter how high-energy the children are.  If you bring children into a public place, they're your responsibility.

This so much. There is currently a video on YouTube where a guy tapes his 8, 4 and 2 year old repeatedly running screaming around the house, while he sits there looking like "womp womp, you can't control kids." I had some very uncharitable thoughts when he said it was to show how parenting really is, he can't help they have so much energy, etc 

Very funny article about the people in Whole Foods stores. I particularly like Birdman. Warning for language though.

https://medium.com/race-class/d778c31aa9be

I've shopped in Whole Foods for years and have never run into anyone like this. I'm wondering just how much he exaggerated in the article.

I find that article odd, too. The one I show at is the polar opposite. The shoppers at my Whole Foods are super crunchy, very polite and extremely apologetic if they get in your way  ;D
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 10:46:04 PM by TeamBhakta »

Zizi-K

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 668
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25747 on: March 05, 2014, 10:42:57 PM »
I nominate the ladies sitting behind me in church this evening.  It was the Ash Wednesday service, which includes a fairly long bit in the middle where the pastor draws a cross with ash on each person's forehead.  It's done in silence, and it took a while because it was a pretty full service.  You're supposed to pray or think quietly while it's going on.

The ladies behind me kept up a running commentary the whole time.  And I suspect one or both of them don't hear as well as they used to, because they were nowhere near as quiet as they probably thought they were.  They weren't saying anything particularly unkind, per se, but it was definitely an "inner monologue" kind of conversation.  ("Oh, I love what she did with her hair!  Didn't she used to have it red?  The silver streaks suit her.  Wow, her son really got taller - is he in college now?  Ooh, is that his girlfriend with him?  Marge said she thought Ron looked better in red, but he's had that blue vest forever and I don't see any reason he should have to stop wearing it now."  Etc. etc. etc.)

Unfortunately there was no way to let them know everyone could hear them  :-\

How about a discrete shush? Or a friendly look back with your finger to your lips?

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11664
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25748 on: March 05, 2014, 11:10:14 PM »
I nominate the ladies sitting behind me in church this evening.  It was the Ash Wednesday service, which includes a fairly long bit in the middle where the pastor draws a cross with ash on each person's forehead.  It's done in silence, and it took a while because it was a pretty full service.  You're supposed to pray or think quietly while it's going on.

The ladies behind me kept up a running commentary the whole time.  And I suspect one or both of them don't hear as well as they used to, because they were nowhere near as quiet as they probably thought they were.  They weren't saying anything particularly unkind, per se, but it was definitely an "inner monologue" kind of conversation.  ("Oh, I love what she did with her hair!  Didn't she used to have it red?  The silver streaks suit her.  Wow, her son really got taller - is he in college now?  Ooh, is that his girlfriend with him?  Marge said she thought Ron looked better in red, but he's had that blue vest forever and I don't see any reason he should have to stop wearing it now."  Etc. etc. etc.)

Unfortunately there was no way to let them know everyone could hear them  :-\
How about a discrete shush? Or a friendly look back with your finger to your lips?

They were a few rows back from me and two or three people to one side, or I would have   :-\

violinp

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3543
  • cabbagegirl28's my sister :)
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25749 on: March 06, 2014, 12:38:56 AM »
I nominate the ladies sitting behind me in church this evening.  It was the Ash Wednesday service, which includes a fairly long bit in the middle where the pastor draws a cross with ash on each person's forehead.  It's done in silence, and it took a while because it was a pretty full service.  You're supposed to pray or think quietly while it's going on.

The ladies behind me kept up a running commentary the whole time.  And I suspect one or both of them don't hear as well as they used to, because they were nowhere near as quiet as they probably thought they were.  They weren't saying anything particularly unkind, per se, but it was definitely an "inner monologue" kind of conversation.  ("Oh, I love what she did with her hair!  Didn't she used to have it red?  The silver streaks suit her.  Wow, her son really got taller - is he in college now?  Ooh, is that his girlfriend with him?  Marge said she thought Ron looked better in red, but he's had that blue vest forever and I don't see any reason he should have to stop wearing it now."  Etc. etc. etc.)

Unfortunately there was no way to let them know everyone could hear them  :-\
How about a discrete shush? Or a friendly look back with your finger to your lips?

They were a few rows back from me and two or three people to one side, or I would have   :-\

The same kind of thing happened at our service, except it was two choir members...during the prelude! I finally just jabbed my fingers in my ears, took them out, and then started praying (all while never looking at them) to give them a big clue that, no, I really don't want to hear how your mom feels about the price of wheat in Indiana or whatever it was they were discussing. I need silence, or at least just the sounds that are supposed to happen, so I can be contemplative and get in a good mindset.

The heck of it is, our music director has a big sign up in the loft that the prelude should be for quiet prayer and contemplation - talk really distracts him, and he's playing some really hard pieces as it is. I just boggle at the amount of disrespect you'd have to have to just keep visiting, knowing that you're being terribly distracting.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


o_gal

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 564
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25750 on: March 06, 2014, 07:40:44 AM »
The heck of it is, our music director has a big sign up in the loft that the prelude should be for quiet prayer and contemplation - talk really distracts him, and he's playing some really hard pieces as it is. I just boggle at the amount of disrespect you'd have to have to just keep visiting, knowing that you're being terribly distracting.

This. And for this, I nominate an entire church full of people.

I play handbells. We were playing prelude for a service last fall. This was a big, event-filled service, with tons of extra people. Normally there is some noise in the sanctuary as we play, as people file in and choose seats. Sometimes there is some talking but nothing too bad. We also usually get put in a wide arc rather than the U-shaped configuration that we use in the room we practice in, so we have to get used to it sounding a little different.

So the church is filling with all these extra people and it's loud. They are all talking and since no one else is being quiet, I think it gives them the impression that they don't have to be quiet. It's seriously very, very loud in there. We start playing and find that people down in the bass bells can't hear the treble, and the treble ringers can't hear the bass. Luckily we hung in there and got through the piece but seriously people? You didn't think hearing the music director play the glockenspiel was enough to signal that prelude is beginnning? Then those 15 people up there waving those big shiny bronze thingies around isn't enough to let you know that you should maybe, oh, shut up, sit down now, and listen?  ::)

AfleetAlex

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 426
  • Proud cat mom and Auntie
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25751 on: March 06, 2014, 12:01:59 PM »
If I've told this story here before, feel free to skip over this.

A couple of years ago some friends and I went to New York City for vacation and one of the things we wanted to do was see a Broadway show. We didn't have a lot of money for tickets so we ended up in the very last row, and we were behind a group of high-school-aged kids (all wearing matching shirts from the same camp). That would have been fine, except in the row in front of us one girl jabbered to her friend for the ENTIRE show. The counselor at the end of the row (maybe 4 people down) didn't say a thing.

I think I had indicated to her to be quiet a couple of times (a look, a finger to lips, nothing impolite) but she completely ignored me. So (shocking my friends as I am usually easy-going) I got up and leaned over to her and told her politely but firmly that she needed to stop talking so the rest of us could hear the performance, or she should go to the lobby. She looked startled and said, "I was just telling my friend something," and I said, "You've been telling her something the whole show. Please be quiet." I believe she quieted down after that, but really, no counselor thought to tell her to behave? The counselors, to be fair, were probably college students, so not much older and apparently not really interested in discipline.

Sadly, I remember more about my encounter with this girl than the show itself.  >:(
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

GlitterIsMyDrug

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1120
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25752 on: March 06, 2014, 12:31:09 PM »
I cannot stand rude theater behavior!

I started doing community theater when I was around 6 or 7, before I was every allowed to perform on stage, I had to learn to be an appropriate audience member. No cat-calling, so feet on the seats, no talking, even what was and wasn't appropriate to wear to a show and how to figure out when to dress up and when to dress down.

When I was 9 my mom and I went to see The Nutcracker. During the ballet she leaned over to asking me how I was liking it, I looked at her, and put my fingers to my lips and said "Intermission is for talking" and went back to watching. I was annoyed by the other kids who came with us because they did not have proper theater behavior and I maintained this was very rude to the performers who worked very hard on the show.

I'm still the same way. Pull out your phone during a performance and you get the evil stare of death from me. Seriously, don't even check the time. Watch the performance.

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8662
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25753 on: March 06, 2014, 02:24:17 PM »


 

When I was 9 my mom and I went to see The Nutcracker. During the ballet she leaned over to asking me how I was liking it, I looked at her, and put my fingers to my lips and said "Intermission is for talking" and went back to watching. I was annoyed by the other kids who came with us because they did not have proper theater behavior and I maintained this was very rude to the performers who worked very hard on the show.

 

This reminded me of this past Christmas, when I went with a friend to see the Nutcracker. I hadn't seen it in years, and love it. My friend, in her 60's never had. So in front of us there is a group consisting of a mom, her son, mom and dad, and their daughter, and grandma to one of them. The kids were clearly friends, and maybe 5 or 6, dressed to the nines, and absolutely adorable!  they were fabulous during the show; the little boy fidgeted a bit during the second half, but was quiet. Not a peep, and during the first half, they were transfixed. It was so nice to see them enjoying it!

TeamBhakta

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2571
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25754 on: March 06, 2014, 03:24:53 PM »
A blizzard of snowflakes: fashion editors stealing from Chanel's fake supermarket at Fashion Week, even after being told to only take the fruits & vegetables

http://racked.com/archives/2014/03/04/security-guards-take-back-the-chanel-stuff-people-stole.php

http://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/19111/1/looting-chanel-in-60-minutes
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 03:27:05 PM by TeamBhakta »