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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6553659 times)

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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26640 on: May 03, 2014, 04:52:58 AM »
My husband is a Marketing Mgr for a Bud Distributor, and part of what he does is coordinate visits from a Clydesdale hitch for special events and such.  They come to town for a week or so and make appearances, have visiting hours etc.  I frequently attend these events, helping DH out where I can. 

It is unbelievable to me how many people throw fits because they are not allowed to take their picture sitting on one of the horses.  Huge work horses who are not raised for riding.  Also, when the team is hitched up to the wagon, absolutely no one other than their professional handlers are allowed to touch them.  No petting, no getting within touching distance.  This is obviously (to me at least) a safety policy - if one of the horses were to startle or rear, it could cause them all to, and you can imagine how much 6-8 Clydesdales AND a huge wagon weighs.  Things could get ugly very fast.  But people will whine and moan about how their little snowflake is different, she just loves "horsies", she should be allowed to get up close, blah blah blah.

Sounds like it's more trouble than it's worth to have the horses there.  That's such a shame, that SS people get to spoil it.

VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26641 on: May 03, 2014, 09:49:39 AM »
I can't imagine letting your kids try to pet the buffalo, either.  We crept through the Custer State Park's herd a couple of years ago, as they ambled along and across the road -- and the pair of young teenage boys in the back seat said they were very glad that there was glass between the buffalo and the people!   There were buffalo noseprints on the outside of the windows, where they'd stuck their noses in, maybe to see if people would feed them?  There are idiots who try to feed bears, so there must certainly be those who would feed buffalo crackers or cookies.  We took our closeups from inside the van.

Didn't Roger Miller advise (in song) "You Can't Roller Skate in a Buffalo Herd"?

The problem is, that's an old song, nobody LISTENS to it any more!
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Library Dragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26642 on: May 03, 2014, 11:13:37 PM »
The SS attending a luncheon last week.  When ordering a ticket it was mandatory to indicate if you (general) wanted the regular, vegetarian, or gluten free meal.  There was also a mandatory allergy yes or no box to check.  If yes, a box to indicate what type. SS didn't indicate that she had a lettuce allergy or any allergy.  The main dish was a southwestern salad with lots of lettuce.  We would never have selected it if we had known.

She whined and complained the entire meal, including during the speeches.

There was one person allergic to broccoli and let us know when ordering her ticket.  We didn't have broccoli at any meal event. 

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iridaceae

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26643 on: May 04, 2014, 12:51:46 AM »
I think I have told this story before but back in the 1970s we went to South Dakota on vacation and one day we decided to drive through Custer. We were on some dinky little side road and got to the end- or possibly a no further sign; I no longer remember which - and turned around and were suddenly in the middle of a herd of buffalo. We could only go as fast as they did and it took us about half an hour  to go 3/4 of a mile. I still remember how our car shook when they brushed up against us.
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snowfire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26644 on: May 04, 2014, 02:44:34 PM »
You don't want to argue with Buffalo or Beefalo.  A friend of mine used to work on a cattle ranch.  Most cattle will move out of the way for a horse or truck.  Buffalo & beefalo will broadside the horse or the truck just for fun because they have an attitude & a very hard head.

Adelaide

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26645 on: May 04, 2014, 03:55:16 PM »
I was talking about how I'd lost a lot of weight and gotten fitter recently and a woman said "Oh yeah? I'm flabby because I brought a beautiful life into the world. Where has your toned body gotten you?"

If there was ever a time I wanted to be catty, it was this one. But I avoided it. Barely.

newbiePA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26646 on: May 04, 2014, 04:07:04 PM »
I was talking about how I'd lost a lot of weight and gotten fitter recently and a woman said "Oh yeah? I'm flabby because I brought a beautiful life into the world. Where has your toned body gotten you?"

If there was ever a time I wanted to be catty, it was this one. But I avoided it. Barely.

Wow, what a horrible thing for her to say.  I don't know if I would have been able to hold my tongue.  And in any case, I have a two year old and a three month old, and am in the best shape of my life.  I didn't know that motherhood removed the ability for one to become fit and/or toned.

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mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26647 on: May 04, 2014, 04:28:37 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

Addy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26648 on: May 04, 2014, 05:51:50 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26649 on: May 04, 2014, 06:22:14 PM »
We've talked a bit about SS groups saving seats in crowded theatres and DH and I found one that had a great solution for packed shows. They had a sign informing people that their entire party had to be gathered before they entered the cinema for the first time and if you left to get snacks then you needed a pass out. I'm not sure how strictly they enforced it as the theatre is rather easy going, but they did tell people to close the gaps between them as it was a full house.

This was to see the Star Wars marathon, but there were more people who showed up for Gone With the Wind. That was full full, not a spare seat in the house. And despite the full house, DH and I saw quite a few empty seats near us, but we were in the front row.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26650 on: May 04, 2014, 06:26:42 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

He's not off leash in public very often, but by "take down", I mean tackle and hold until a human in charge gets there.  Also, I've never seen him respond to "whiney child who doesn't want to go home".  He knows the difference.  I mean a child who's genuinely terrified.  For example: we were at the beach.  A father went to beat his 5ish year old child with an umbrella for daring to get wet.  The dog placed himself between the father and the child and snarled while bystanders called the cops. Every time the father tried to swing the umbrella, the dog got in the way.  His instinct is not to bite, but to use his size to *prevent*, if that makes any sense. In the situation I described above, he was on leash, but the father and child were close enough for the dog to respond, and frankly, I had no intent on making him move at that moment.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

wheeitsme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26651 on: May 04, 2014, 06:38:34 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

He's not off leash in public very often, but by "take down", I mean tackle and hold until a human in charge gets there.  Also, I've never seen him respond to "whiney child who doesn't want to go home".  He knows the difference.  I mean a child who's genuinely terrified.  For example: we were at the beach.  A father went to beat his 5ish year old child with an umbrella for daring to get wet.  The dog placed himself between the father and the child and snarled while bystanders called the cops. Every time the father tried to swing the umbrella, the dog got in the way.  His instinct is not to bite, but to use his size to *prevent*, if that makes any sense. In the situation I described above, he was on leash, but the father and child were close enough for the dog to respond, and frankly, I had no intent on making him move at that moment.

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gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26652 on: May 04, 2014, 06:52:21 PM »
Good dog, indeed! 

I hope the police let you and him (your dog) know that he'd done a good job and that neither of you were in even the remotest danger of getting into any kind of trouble for not allowing the father hit his child with an umbrella.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26653 on: May 04, 2014, 07:03:09 PM »
Good dog, indeed! 

I hope the police let you and him (your dog) know that he'd done a good job and that neither of you were in even the remotest danger of getting into any kind of trouble for not allowing the father hit his child with an umbrella.

The father wound up having outstanding warrants for custodial interference and was taken into custody.  CPS was called in to take custody of the child until another relative could be found.  After it was all said and done, one of the officers stayed behind to chat with me a bit. Baxter was given doggie treats by that officer, who was very interested in his breed as an option for police dogs.  His breed is actually used by the county north of where this occurred.  He asked me how I trained him to do that.  I told him that was pure instinct.  His instinct is never to bite first, but to intimidate using his sheer size and either a very deep "Hi, I'm the big dog in charge" bark, or a low, grumbly growl while staring somebody down.  He also has this "I really want to bark at this person who's walking by the house, but you say I can't so I'll go mope in a corner" growl.  I find that one hysterical.
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HoneyBee42

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26654 on: May 04, 2014, 07:37:40 PM »
Good dog, indeed! 

I hope the police let you and him (your dog) know that he'd done a good job and that neither of you were in even the remotest danger of getting into any kind of trouble for not allowing the father hit his child with an umbrella.

The father wound up having outstanding warrants for custodial interference and was taken into custody.  CPS was called in to take custody of the child until another relative could be found.  After it was all said and done, one of the officers stayed behind to chat with me a bit. Baxter was given doggie treats by that officer, who was very interested in his breed as an option for police dogs.  His breed is actually used by the county north of where this occurred.  He asked me how I trained him to do that.  I told him that was pure instinct.  His instinct is never to bite first, but to intimidate using his sheer size and either a very deep "Hi, I'm the big dog in charge" bark, or a low, grumbly growl while staring somebody down.  He also has this "I really want to bark at this person who's walking by the house, but you say I can't so I'll go mope in a corner" growl.  I find that one hysterical.
That's funny--I had an Akita, and my parents have had a Great Dane (and now have a Great Dane puppy), and my experience was that the bark was this really soft little "woof" that sounded really funny from such large dogs.  Kind of a "this is your warning, don't make me break out the real bark".  My Akita also did the stand in between me and anyone she didn't know, and no attempts to move around the room were able to change that (meter guy who was really all right and my former BIL who was almost as much of a jerk as my actual ex--my other BIL is a decent man).