Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5042464 times)

6 Members and 6 Guests are viewing this topic.

Addy

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 486
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26655 on: May 04, 2014, 06:51:50 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1719
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26656 on: May 04, 2014, 07:22:14 PM »
We've talked a bit about SS groups saving seats in crowded theatres and DH and I found one that had a great solution for packed shows. They had a sign informing people that their entire party had to be gathered before they entered the cinema for the first time and if you left to get snacks then you needed a pass out. I'm not sure how strictly they enforced it as the theatre is rather easy going, but they did tell people to close the gaps between them as it was a full house.

This was to see the Star Wars marathon, but there were more people who showed up for Gone With the Wind. That was full full, not a spare seat in the house. And despite the full house, DH and I saw quite a few empty seats near us, but we were in the front row.

mmswm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2145
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26657 on: May 04, 2014, 07:26:42 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

He's not off leash in public very often, but by "take down", I mean tackle and hold until a human in charge gets there.  Also, I've never seen him respond to "whiney child who doesn't want to go home".  He knows the difference.  I mean a child who's genuinely terrified.  For example: we were at the beach.  A father went to beat his 5ish year old child with an umbrella for daring to get wet.  The dog placed himself between the father and the child and snarled while bystanders called the cops. Every time the father tried to swing the umbrella, the dog got in the way.  His instinct is not to bite, but to use his size to *prevent*, if that makes any sense. In the situation I described above, he was on leash, but the father and child were close enough for the dog to respond, and frankly, I had no intent on making him move at that moment.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

wheeitsme

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3960
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26658 on: May 04, 2014, 07:38:34 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

He's not off leash in public very often, but by "take down", I mean tackle and hold until a human in charge gets there.  Also, I've never seen him respond to "whiney child who doesn't want to go home".  He knows the difference.  I mean a child who's genuinely terrified.  For example: we were at the beach.  A father went to beat his 5ish year old child with an umbrella for daring to get wet.  The dog placed himself between the father and the child and snarled while bystanders called the cops. Every time the father tried to swing the umbrella, the dog got in the way.  His instinct is not to bite, but to use his size to *prevent*, if that makes any sense. In the situation I described above, he was on leash, but the father and child were close enough for the dog to respond, and frankly, I had no intent on making him move at that moment.

Good Dog!

gramma dishes

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7908
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26659 on: May 04, 2014, 07:52:21 PM »
Good dog, indeed! 

I hope the police let you and him (your dog) know that he'd done a good job and that neither of you were in even the remotest danger of getting into any kind of trouble for not allowing the father hit his child with an umbrella.

mmswm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2145
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26660 on: May 04, 2014, 08:03:09 PM »
Good dog, indeed! 

I hope the police let you and him (your dog) know that he'd done a good job and that neither of you were in even the remotest danger of getting into any kind of trouble for not allowing the father hit his child with an umbrella.

The father wound up having outstanding warrants for custodial interference and was taken into custody.  CPS was called in to take custody of the child until another relative could be found.  After it was all said and done, one of the officers stayed behind to chat with me a bit. Baxter was given doggie treats by that officer, who was very interested in his breed as an option for police dogs.  His breed is actually used by the county north of where this occurred.  He asked me how I trained him to do that.  I told him that was pure instinct.  His instinct is never to bite first, but to intimidate using his sheer size and either a very deep "Hi, I'm the big dog in charge" bark, or a low, grumbly growl while staring somebody down.  He also has this "I really want to bark at this person who's walking by the house, but you say I can't so I'll go mope in a corner" growl.  I find that one hysterical.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

HoneyBee42

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 591
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26661 on: May 04, 2014, 08:37:40 PM »
Good dog, indeed! 

I hope the police let you and him (your dog) know that he'd done a good job and that neither of you were in even the remotest danger of getting into any kind of trouble for not allowing the father hit his child with an umbrella.

The father wound up having outstanding warrants for custodial interference and was taken into custody.  CPS was called in to take custody of the child until another relative could be found.  After it was all said and done, one of the officers stayed behind to chat with me a bit. Baxter was given doggie treats by that officer, who was very interested in his breed as an option for police dogs.  His breed is actually used by the county north of where this occurred.  He asked me how I trained him to do that.  I told him that was pure instinct.  His instinct is never to bite first, but to intimidate using his sheer size and either a very deep "Hi, I'm the big dog in charge" bark, or a low, grumbly growl while staring somebody down.  He also has this "I really want to bark at this person who's walking by the house, but you say I can't so I'll go mope in a corner" growl.  I find that one hysterical.
That's funny--I had an Akita, and my parents have had a Great Dane (and now have a Great Dane puppy), and my experience was that the bark was this really soft little "woof" that sounded really funny from such large dogs.  Kind of a "this is your warning, don't make me break out the real bark".  My Akita also did the stand in between me and anyone she didn't know, and no attempts to move around the room were able to change that (meter guy who was really all right and my former BIL who was almost as much of a jerk as my actual ex--my other BIL is a decent man).


Kimblee

  • I look good in white....
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6673
  • "Hugs don't go Boom." "They don't? Since when?"
    • My Blog
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26662 on: May 04, 2014, 09:16:14 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

Depending on the dog, it may be on leash but not stay there if there's a danger.

A Great Dane we used to have broke a tow chain that was holding him in our yard when I wandered into traffic. He was a vicious thing, hated everything over about 16 years old. My dad could kinda keep Brute under control. And by under control I mean he didn't actively try to bite or maul Dad. More than once I wandered into "Brute's yard" and my mother had to call my father home from work to get me back out because while he would NEVER harm me, he had no problem lunging at her. (The fact this happened multiple times makes me wonder where the heck mom was when I was opening gates and playing with "my" dog)

Then one day, during a family picnic I tried to wander onto the highway in front of our house. Cue Brute breaking his chain, leaping a five foot fence and knocking me into the ditch off the road. TRIGGER He wasn't fast enough to protect himself though. A car hit his back legs and he had to be put down. I'm told he tried to bite the vet one last time. He... was a complicated dog. But a hero.

JenJay

  • I'm a nonconformist who doesn't conform to the prevailing standards of nonconformity.
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5784
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26663 on: May 04, 2014, 09:24:40 PM »
He also has this "I really want to bark at this person who's walking by the house, but you say I can't so I'll go mope in a corner" growl.  I find that one hysterical.

Our black lab did this low chuff non-bark in the same spirit. It was like "You told me not to bark, and technically I'm obeying, but I don't have to like it!"  ;D

Edited- Oops, just noticed this is the SS thread, sorry for derailing.

Shea

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26664 on: May 04, 2014, 10:25:51 PM »
I think people like that don't see animals as beings with brains. Or they're of the thought process that no animal should EVER be in public that can't handle things like a child running up to them (and in some cases I think that's true, but in most cases; it's just not realistic).

Some horses can have years of training but still not be able to deal with small things darting around. They are prey animals after all.

My best friend has a horse who has been in training for years. He's a good boy, he knows the rules. A look, a growl, a shift in my body and he knows what I want and he listens. But he's very reactive. Had that been him on that trail? He would have left and that little girl would have gotten hurt in the process. He goes out in public (shows, the vet, etc), but my friend and myself are always aware that the most random things can set him off. He may never get over that, so we are as diligent as we can be to keep him and everybody around him safe.

One of her other horses is nearly 30. He's seen it all. There's very very little that gets him wound up. Except for boats. In his little brain boats do not belong on land. They belong in the water. A boat on land is absolutely not to be trusted. He's the safest horse in the world. I would put a rank beginner on him in a heartbeat, but the last time I rode him, I nearly came off because we crossed paths with a boat on land and that just wasn't right.

I had a horse growing up who was pretty level headed.  I was out with my 4-H group on a trail ride when we encountered a rattlesnake right in the middle of the path.  Good Boy very calmly moved with the rest of the group around the snake (giving it a wide berth) and went on his merry way.

5 minutes later, we rounded a curve to head back to camp.  He saw the camp dumpster and promptly lost his mind.

I had an Arabian when I was a teenager. Like many of her breed, she was on the spooky side, but I was good at handling her. One day on a trail ride, a ground squirrel skittered out from its burrow and across the trail, literally between her front hooves. She pricked her ears and looked at it, but didn't spook a bit. Then, as we were riding back to the barn, she caught sight of a barrel (that, I might add, had been in that exact same location for weeks), jumped three feet sideways and bolted. You never know what's going to set them off.


If a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, librarians are a global threat.

StarFaerie

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1154
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26665 on: May 04, 2014, 10:46:18 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

He's not off leash in public very often, but by "take down", I mean tackle and hold until a human in charge gets there.  Also, I've never seen him respond to "whiney child who doesn't want to go home".  He knows the difference.  I mean a child who's genuinely terrified.  For example: we were at the beach.  A father went to beat his 5ish year old child with an umbrella for daring to get wet.  The dog placed himself between the father and the child and snarled while bystanders called the cops. Every time the father tried to swing the umbrella, the dog got in the way.  His instinct is not to bite, but to use his size to *prevent*, if that makes any sense. In the situation I described above, he was on leash, but the father and child were close enough for the dog to respond, and frankly, I had no intent on making him move at that moment.

If your dog "took me down" because I smacked my child or dragged them to the car when they were misbehaving or anything like that, you'd be up for one heck of a law suit and probably a dog that I would insist on being put down as a dangerous dog, and I am a dog lover. I grew up with large dogs so I have no fear or misconceptions about them, but anyone or anything who gets between me and my child is in for trouble. I certainly hope you keep that dog on a tight leash at all times and use your human brain to decide when you let him intervene and when there is a real danger to a child rather than just a situation that he has misinterpreted. If he goes on alert at a parent yelling at their own child, it sounds as though he regularly misinterprets situations.

Piratelvr1121

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10804
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26666 on: May 04, 2014, 10:50:39 PM »
Speaking of dogs, a friend of ours and her stbx owned an Alaskan Malamute who was sweet as can be but also very hyper and poorly trained because the SS STBX thought he knew more about training than the trainers at the pet store and so as a result the dog never did learn how to behave on or off leash.

We avoided going over there after one time the dog terrified my middle child who was about 4 at the time, I think. My son had not approached the dog, in fact he usually tried to avoid him because the dog made him nervous.  I believe the dog had come in from outside (it's been a long time, my memory's admittedly not perfect) and gone after my oldest, who was about 6 and he handled it alright (froze, let dog sniff him calmly)  but then the dog went to the 4 year old who backed up and fell over and burst into tears. 

Friend went on the defensive, insisting the child was "being silly for being so afraid of the dog!" Yeah, sorry, there are adults who get nervous around large or even average sized breeds. This was a four year old boy who was easily outweighed by this dog and it scared him.

They eventually gave the dog up, which in all truth was probably in the best interests of the dog in the long run.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

wheeitsme

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3960
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26667 on: May 04, 2014, 11:02:24 PM »
Back on dogs:  He's a mastiff, not a child killer.  Actually, if he's out in public and you are yelling out your own child, a child he doesn't even know, he will go on high alert to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  If anybody threatens your child in any way, even though he's never met your child before, and just because he knows that this little person is a child, he will go into all out protective mode.  Every child in his range is fully protected from kidnapping or worse, as he'd do everything in his power to take down the person hurting any child, no matter if said child is one of his boys or just some random stranger.

That said, I ran into another "Giant dog must be horrible!" person a few days ago.  If you're seriously that afraid of big dogs, don't go to pet stores where they're welcome.

Regarding the bolded, is your dog off-leash in public? This actually seems dangerous to me, if your dog will attack if he thinks a child is in danger. What if a parent were playing a chasing game with a child and the kid was shrieking? Or just having a melt down while a parent needed to get the kid into a car to head home?

He's not off leash in public very often, but by "take down", I mean tackle and hold until a human in charge gets there.  Also, I've never seen him respond to "whiney child who doesn't want to go home".  He knows the difference.  I mean a child who's genuinely terrified.  For example: we were at the beach.  A father went to beat his 5ish year old child with an umbrella for daring to get wet.  The dog placed himself between the father and the child and snarled while bystanders called the cops. Every time the father tried to swing the umbrella, the dog got in the way.  His instinct is not to bite, but to use his size to *prevent*, if that makes any sense. In the situation I described above, he was on leash, but the father and child were close enough for the dog to respond, and frankly, I had no intent on making him move at that moment.

If your dog "took me down" because I smacked my child or dragged them to the car when they were misbehaving or anything like that, you'd be up for one heck of a law suit and probably a dog that I would insist on being put down as a dangerous dog, and I am a dog lover. I grew up with large dogs so I have no fear or misconceptions about them, but anyone or anything who gets between me and my child is in for trouble. I certainly hope you keep that dog on a tight leash at all times and use your human brain to decide when you let him intervene and when there is a real danger to a child rather than just a situation that he has misinterpreted. If he goes on alert at a parent yelling at their own child, it sounds as though he regularly misinterprets situations.

I've found that dogs can tell the difference between loving discipline and abuse.  That's why even the growliest ones give us sad eyes when we say "Bad Dog".


Micah

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 551
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26668 on: May 05, 2014, 04:56:47 AM »
I have a dog who is obsessed by 'babies'. Or what she thinks are babies. I've figured out that she seems to go by size, which has led to confusion in the past. Prime example is a friend's tiny, but adult chihuahua. That had her completely confuzzled.

She is extremely protective about her 'babies' though and her babies include any and all visiting animals and children. In her mind babies must be watched with an eagle eye. If they stray too far from their parent or caretaker she very carefully blocks them with her body and pushes them back in the right direction. If this doesn't work she runs to the parent, barks hysterically and leads them to the recalcitrant 'baby.'

Kittens are babies until they reach a certain size. Up until this point they have to put up with her constantly monitoring their whereabouts and subjecting them to vigorous full body washings. After they've reached a certain size, she just ignores them.

I've actually used her to find my son when he was younger. He went through a stage where he'd hide somewhere bizarre in the house and refuse to answer to any calls or summons. An instruction of 'find him, where'd he go!" to the dog would have her hunting the entire house until she found him. She'd then stand and bark at him until I reached her side. Of course son loved this.  ::)

Mulder: "So...Lunch?"
Scully: "Mulder, toads just fell from the sky!"
Mulder: "Maybe their parachutes didn't open."

MissRose

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2920
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26669 on: May 05, 2014, 08:22:02 AM »
I got to love some of the SS's when I went up north with my parents to see my grandmother:

*The ever present drivers with cell phones glued to one ear

*People cutting across lanes without using blinkers especially on the expressway

*I took my parents and grandma to evening Mass .  The announcement ahead of time said please silence or turn off ALL electronic devices, and please take noisy babies/kids to either cry room or outside the sanctuary.  Someone's cell phone went off during one of the most important parts of Mass (the consecration) when it is usually VERY quiet.   

...And last but not least, my mother the backseat driver.  I nearly pulled off the road and demanded she drive due to her constant criticism of my driving but she said I don't want to drive on the freeway in the rain and the dark as we leave early in the morning.  I am a safe and good driver, and I never heard my dad and grandma complain at any time about my skills.  She then needed some duct tape for her mouth as on the way home she decided to criticize my dad and me for a short time.  I was so glad to get home.