Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5361587 times)

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26715 on: May 07, 2014, 08:24:13 AM »
My mother tried to teach me to drive a stick and it just didn't go very well.  She had been saying for a while, "you should just learn by watching!" But I'm not very good at learning simply by watching someone else do it. It's one thing if they're explaining as they drive why they're shifting at a certain time.  Or with anything else, I want to know what it is they're doing rather than simply watching. 

So when DH bought a car with a manual transmission once we were married, he put me behind the wheel, told me how to start it off, when to shift and how to tell by the sound of the engine when to shift.  He taught the basics of starting and getting it going, then let me figure out the rest.  Now that frustrated me but oh man I learn and I have to say, now we have a van with automatic, I actually miss driving a stick.

It's funny too, I could be driven to a location several times but not remember how to get there, but after I've driven myself there once I rarely forget.

As for living near a ball park, that's one reason I wonder why someone would live near a golf course, as I'd be worried about stray balls breaking windows or hitting people in the head, or people wandering into a yard to get the balls.
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nayberry

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26716 on: May 07, 2014, 08:29:08 AM »
Special Snowflake "Didn't Check The Location When She Moved" edition

A cricket team in Oxfordshire have been forced to ban hitting sixes* because of one resident who has threatened to sue them if any more balls come into her back garden.

The reason I say she's a special snowflake is this: The cricket ground has been there 80 odd years. She is (so the news article said) in her 60s. In other words, the cricket ground is older than she is - or, to put it another way, the cricket ground was there when she bought the house. Given that, I'm not sure she'd get anywhere if she did attempt to sue** - but the cricket club, like a lot of amateur sports clubs, can't afford to take that risk.


*a six is when the ball reaches the boundary without touching the ground - I think it's probably equivalent to a home run in baseball
**not legal opinion; just an observation from having dealt with similar situations in the past

I'm going to play devil's advocate here and say I can partly see her side of this.

Yes, she should have done more research into the area, and yes, threatening to sue is never a nice thing to do, and yes, it's an overreaction in this case but I can understand her frustration if balls coming into her garden is a regular occurrence. She could be concerned about the possibility of pets or grandchildren getting hurt (if she has them) or her plants or windows getting damaged. Not to mention, as a 60 year old woman, she could be quite intimidated by strange men she doesn't know either knocking on her door to retrieve a ball or trying to jump her fence to grab it, and even if they don't do so, she could be worried they might.

Without more info, all I can make is assumptions, but most people don't go from 0 - "I'll sue!" It's entirely possible that she has tried the polite approach first and been shrugged off, and is now having to resort to more drastic action to make sure the club is paying attention.

i'd only see her side if the cricket club was new after she had bought the house.  she moved there well after the CC was established and has the gall to complain?

i live in an area where i can, within 10-15 miles, find approx 8 cricket clubs.  one of which has a deal with a pub across the road from it, that if a player hits a six and breaks a window the player will have to buy a round at the bar, which more than covers the window cost.  the CC has been there 40 years longer than the pub.


Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26717 on: May 07, 2014, 08:37:27 AM »
I learned to drive, and took my test on a stick.  In the 70s, when I learned, gas prices were just starting to climb, and at the time, stick shifts were better on gas. (Nowadays, automatics are so efficient that it doesn't matter anymore).  HOWEVER....when I was in my 20s, driving a stick meant that I never had to loan my car to my friends, and now that I'm old and gray, driving a stick means that my car is less likely to be stolen!

Driving stick also makes you look cool.   8)  I play ball on a couple of teams with a bunch of 20 somethings with a sprinkle of 30 somethings.  I'm mid 40's.  Impresses the heck out of the young kids that the old girl drives stick.   ;D

(Stick shifts are still better on gas, unless it is a CVT, based on the research I did last fall when I was buying my latest vehicle.)
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26718 on: May 07, 2014, 09:33:15 AM »
Dad would slap Stepsister on the leg whenever she used her left foot on the brake.   She was learning to drive in summer and was wearing shorts.  She would have a red leg when she got out of the car.

That said, she did learn to drive and had her license by the end of the year.  Still, I didn't want him to teach me.   So I did take Driver Ed and my DH (then boyfriend) taught me to drive a stick.

That's why it's a very good idea to learn how to drive a stick shift in the first place. The left foot never gets used for anything but the clutch.


We've had the opposite experience.  I don't know how people learn to drive autos in the US, but here in the UK I was taught to drive one using my right foot only so my left foot isn't used at all.  My DH learned to drive in a manual, and when he started using an auto his left foot flapped around he found it difficult to remember not to lift his foot off the accelerator when the gears were changing (this can be felt, in an auto, IME).

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26719 on: May 07, 2014, 09:35:57 AM »
I was one confused little puppy learning to drive.  Our truck was 3 on the tree, the car was 5 on the floor and the driver's ed car was automatic.  I almost gave the instructor whiplash the first time he took me out because I ended up with both feet on the brake.

He didn't call it that but he directed my left foot to the dead pedal and told me to leave it there, somewhat forcefully.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26720 on: May 07, 2014, 09:39:04 AM »
"Dead pedal"?

BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26721 on: May 07, 2014, 09:53:51 AM »
"Dead pedal"?

There's an elevated "ridge" in some cars - I think that might be the "dead pedal."

My father used to drive a semi, so he would "double-brake" when driving his car.  He was stopped and warned by the police so many times, they were on a first-name basis.

Seven Ate Nine

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26722 on: May 07, 2014, 09:55:34 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I can't figure out why people move into subdivisions in the middle of farms/other rural type communities.  It's the worst of both worlds.  20 minutes to the nearest gas station and 10 feet from your neighbor.  Where I live is no longer really farmland, but most people have acreage and many keep cows/chickens/extensive gardens.  There is a dairy farm nearby (mmmm, ice cream) a berry farm a few miles away, and a few people that have fields of crops.  In the middle of that, a contractor is trying to build one of those new subdivisions with huge houses that are right up next to each other.  I don't think I've seen a new house started since we moved here two years ago.

Midge

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26723 on: May 07, 2014, 10:03:48 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I can't figure out why people move into subdivisions in the middle of farms/other rural type communities.  It's the worst of both worlds.  20 minutes to the nearest gas station and 10 feet from your neighbor.  Where I live is no longer really farmland, but most people have acreage and many keep cows/chickens/extensive gardens.  There is a dairy farm nearby (mmmm, ice cream) a berry farm a few miles away, and a few people that have fields of crops.  In the middle of that, a contractor is trying to build one of those new subdivisions with huge houses that are right up next to each other.  I don't think I've seen a new house started since we moved here two years ago.

That's the kind of subdivision my ILs--both MIL and FIL, and SIL and BIL--live in. In fact, right across the street from each other! (But that's a rant for another day). You can't walk anywhere, because even something theoretically within walking distance is across a freeway, and they all live in these big houses with 20 feet in between them on two, maybe three sides. No privacy, but out in the middle of nowhere. Worst of both worlds, indeed.

And they all complain about the noise and dirt when another house is built out there. Apparently their houses were built silently overnight.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26724 on: May 07, 2014, 10:06:52 AM »
"Dead pedal"?

There's an elevated "ridge" in some cars - I think that might be the "dead pedal."

My father used to drive a semi, so he would "double-brake" when driving his car.  He was stopped and warned by the police so many times, they were on a first-name basis.

In most cars I've driven, there is a flat area off to the left, right at the wall.  Sometimes, it is even rubberized like the top of the regular pedals.  I've taken two defensive driving courses (skid school) and the instructors always told us that your left foot should stay on the dead pedal.  Something about giving you the most stability if you need to make quick manouvers with the other foot, as well as keeping it out of the way.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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pwv

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26725 on: May 07, 2014, 10:11:37 AM »
Years and decades ago, county officials contacted the Navy base my father was stationed at to ask advice on building a civilian airport.   Dad and the other pilots offered their advice and comments, one of which was that the county should buy excess land surrounding the airport to create a buffer.  Since the site was in the middle of nowhere, not near anything, the county ignored this piece of advice because they didn't think it was necessary.  Dad and the other pilots kept trying to explain why it was necessary, but couldn't convince the county officials.  Eventually the land around the airport was bought up and houses were built closer and closer to the airport, and the residents began complaining about the noise and being in the flight path, etc.  Eventually they managed to get the airport shut down, even though it had been there for years and years before the houses had been built.

JenJay

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26726 on: May 07, 2014, 10:31:14 AM »
Years and decades ago, county officials contacted the Navy base my father was stationed at to ask advice on building a civilian airport.   Dad and the other pilots offered their advice and comments, one of which was that the county should buy excess land surrounding the airport to create a buffer.  Since the site was in the middle of nowhere, not near anything, the county ignored this piece of advice because they didn't think it was necessary.  Dad and the other pilots kept trying to explain why it was necessary, but couldn't convince the county officials.  Eventually the land around the airport was bought up and houses were built closer and closer to the airport, and the residents began complaining about the noise and being in the flight path, etc.  Eventually they managed to get the airport shut down, even though it had been there for years and years before the houses had been built.

DH was an MP on an air station (mostly jets, but also big planes and helicopters) and had that problem with people calling the base to complain. And like your scenario, the base had been there long before the neighborhood  ::). I don't understand the fuss, personally. When he got stationed there I was so incredibly thrilled, having grown up with posters of the Blue Angels on my walls instead of teenaged heartthrobs. I understand that the roar of a jet isn't for everyone but my favorite thing was to sit on the porch every morning with a cup of coffee and watch them come and go!!

(They did have some fun with it, though. They'd tell the complainer that they needed the serial number off the jet's tail so they could identify which squadron it belonged to and have the flight path re-routed. He always wondered how many people tried to run outside and catch the number before they realized they'd been had.)

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26727 on: May 07, 2014, 10:48:57 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I posted about something similar, earlier in this thread. (My goodness! 5 years ago! This thread has sure been going on a long time.)

Mrs. Snowflake and the turkey farm

Nutrax
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26728 on: May 07, 2014, 11:05:53 AM »
There is (was?) an abbatoir that used to be on the outskirts of Toronto.  Over many years, the abbatoir was slowly surrounded by urban sprawl but with a fair bit of land left undeveloped around it.  As is bound the happen, the land close to the abbatoir was eventually sold and developed into medium density housing - town homes and the like, rather than single family detached homes but not apartments, if I recall correctly.

The new owners of that medium density housing?  Demanded that the abbatoir be shut down.  The owners of the abbatoir were of the 'We were here first' opinion and had no interest in closing down.

I never did hear how it was resolved.

When I purchased my home, I knew I was within a mile or so of the city landfill site.  I figured I'd get some odours once in a while and I wasn't too worried.  But what I didn't know is that there is also a large scale chicken farm about 5 miles away.  The odour from the farm is far worse than anything I've ever experienced from the landfill site, even when they were mining* to extend its lifetime.  Sure, I complain to my colleagues at work (we receive lots of public complaints about both of these sites) but do I expect the chicken farm to close up shop?  Nope.  I just close the windows on the days they do the barn cleanouts, which is when it smells the most.

*mining is when they dig down into older, closed cells, removing recyclables and moving the rest into rehabbed cells with better protection to prevent leaching into the water table.  The emptied cell is then rehabbed and eventually used for garbage again.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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hermanne

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26729 on: May 07, 2014, 11:07:22 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I posted about something similar, earlier in this thread. (My goodness! 5 years ago! This thread has sure been going on a long time.)

Mrs. Snowflake and the turkey farm

I'd ask the farm if they had Thanksgiving deals! And eggs! (Pig farm near us used to have eggs, with bright orange yolks.)

Did you ever find out what happened with Mrs. Snowflake?
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