Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5536140 times)

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Yarnspinner

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26745 on: May 07, 2014, 02:16:42 PM »
I grew up surrounded on all sides by large family farms, mostly dairy, but also chicken.  Cow manure wasn't a problem, but chicken droppings made my eyes water.  Absolute worst was when my nominative uncle and his boys would spread the silage, which seemed to be ground up grass and a combo of manures...and they always seemed to do it when they KNEW the family was going to be having a cookout/party what have you. 

Sort of in the "we were here first" category, but not quite....my father tells of one of his friends, back in the 1950s, wanting to close all the local farms down, take the land away from them and have it divided up into affordable housing because "it wasn't fair that they were wasting all that land on animals and growing food for animals when people needed cheap places to live."  He tried to do it, too, at every town meeting, demanding that the town confiscate all farm properties (there were about seven family farms at the time) and turn it into housing for "the people".

Finally, at one of his more heated performances, a town council member said "John, can I ask a question?  Is this something you think that should be done with ALL farms?"

"Of course" John replied "we should be closing down all the farms in this country and turning the land into housing tracts."

"ALL the farms, John?"

"ALL of them.  We don't need farms.  Why do you want to perpetuate such unfair land use?"

"Well, John, where do you think we should then get eggs, butter, cream, meat, poultry and so on?"

This man, who was otherwise NOT an idiot, became incensed and said "Well, we'll get that stuff at the grocery story like we do now.  Why do we need farms when we can go to the grocery store?"

Three of the farms are still operating, as far as I know.

Margo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26746 on: May 07, 2014, 02:50:41 PM »
Dad would slap Stepsister on the leg whenever she used her left foot on the brake.   She was learning to drive in summer and was wearing shorts.  She would have a red leg when she got out of the car.

That said, she did learn to drive and had her license by the end of the year.  Still, I didn't want him to teach me.   So I did take Driver Ed and my DH (then boyfriend) taught me to drive a stick.

That's why it's a very good idea to learn how to drive a stick shift in the first place. The left foot never gets used for anything but the clutch.


We've had the opposite experience.  I don't know how people learn to drive autos in the US, but here in the UK I was taught to drive one using my right foot only so my left foot isn't used at all.  My DH learned to drive in a manual, and when he started using an auto his left foot flapped around he found it difficult to remember not to lift his foot off the accelerator when the gears were changing (this can be felt, in an auto, IME).
I haven't driven in the UK, but on first thought, this makes sense - your cars are reversed from US cars, right?  (Driver's side is opposite, so everything else is opposite?)  I remember when I hired a car to take me to the airport, I realized the gear shift was on the driver's left and realized that even if I knew how to drive a manual in the US, I would have issues in the UK, as the muscle memory/instinct would be in the wrong side.

The driver is on the opposite side but the pedals are the same way round - accelerator on the right, brake in the middle and clutch on the left.  When I visited the US and hired a car I was concerned that I might find it difficult to adjust to the gear lever being on the wrong' side but it wasn't really an issue. I actually had more difficulty getting used to the fact that the ignition was in a different place to my car so I kept trying to put the key in the wrong place (had exactly the same problem when I changed me car earlier this year)


alkira6

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26747 on: May 07, 2014, 02:56:00 PM »
 ::)  We lived about 2 miles away from an airport for about a year.  Best apartment we ever had.  We acclimated to the noise within a week, cheap rent because *airport*, neighbors who were mostly pilots, so very little neighbor noise.  Best of all, $350 for a nicely sized 2 bedroom/1 bath with a patio because *airport* and no one else but us wanted to live there.

Dindrane

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26748 on: May 07, 2014, 02:58:43 PM »
My family took a trip to Ireland several years ago, and we rented a car to drive to a few different cities. My dad is of the generation that grew up driving stick (because that's all there was), and is a generally good driver. He was mostly fine with the actual operation of the manual car we ended up with, but ended up trying to shift the door handle whenever he was stressed. Which was kind of a lot, because he found it very difficult to position the car correctly in the lane from the "wrong" vantage point.

Other than that, though, he seemed to do fine. I hadn't even thought about the possibility of the pedals being the other way around, but I doubt he'd have been comfortable attempting to drive in an unfamiliar country if they had been.


siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26749 on: May 07, 2014, 03:02:06 PM »
I grew up not too far from Newark Liberty Airport, and some of the flight paths went right over my house. I can recall, growing up, the powers that be wanted them changed, as our town was an "upscale" town, and therefore shouldn't have to deal with the noise. FTR, it wasn't that bad, and after a while, you didn't even notice it.

My last apt was also in a flight path for that airport, plus i lived less than 5 miles from a small municipal airport that catered to mostly corporate jets, as well as being on the route for helicopters heading to the local hospital where there's a Level 1 trauma center. At times, esp with the helicopters, and due to the old cruddy windows, they'd fly low and they'd rattle, but again, nothing you couldn't deal with.

what was worse for me was right after 9/11, when all airspace was shut down, was the quiet. I'd been so used to the background noise of planes, when there was nothing, it was kind of creepy.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26750 on: May 07, 2014, 03:02:32 PM »
See, in my town...the SS won on that one, shadowfox.  All the streets in my town have...interesting names.  (So much so that when you give your address for something, if the person is familiar with the area, they say, "Oh, you live in X.")

So one of the streets was Satan Wood Drive.  Had been for AGES.  People started complaining.  After a few months, the name was changed to Satin Wood Drive.  My attitude was....the name was there when you moved in.  If yer that offended...don't move there!

I disagree with that idea, that you can't change something afterward. It's one thing if what you want to change means someone loses their livelihood. But changing the name of your street? I don't think that's such a horrible thing to want to do. Or to work toward. And it was "people," not one person. So if the majority of the people on the street want to have a different name (or even if not a majority--if there really isn't a huge vocal opposition), what's the big deal?

And Satan Wood is pretty bad. So is Sodom Lane, actually.

Eh, I have to go with Toots on this one as I could see someone finding a house they absolutely loved and then think "But I really wish the street name was different!"

Though I do have to laugh, as the name change made me think of "Wreck It Ralph" Since there is a character who looks like Satan but insists it's pronounced "Sateen". 

The area I grew up in also had themed names and each neighborhood (they were referred to as "villages" to make them sound more quaint than they really were) had its own theme.

At my university, all students are assigned a personal identification number of 7 digits. We have no control over the numbers. Since I have worked here, for 7 years, I have had two students complain that their number was "evil" because of digits in it. We didn't change it for them since we can't.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26751 on: May 07, 2014, 03:24:37 PM »
::)  We lived about 2 miles away from an airport for about a year.  Best apartment we ever had.  We acclimated to the noise within a week, cheap rent because *airport*, neighbors who were mostly pilots, so very little neighbor noise.  Best of all, $350 for a nicely sized 2 bedroom/1 bath with a patio because *airport* and no one else but us wanted to live there.

I think I remember an episode of Cheers where Carla was looking for a house and it was priced so cheaply that she was worried that there had been a murder in the house or it was haunted or something.  And then a plane flew over that sounded like it was going to land in the living room of said house.  She asked the real estate agent if that was why it was priced so low.  Once she got the affirmative answer, she threw her arms wide and yelled, 'Honey, I'm home!'.
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Ontario

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26752 on: May 07, 2014, 03:30:56 PM »
Quote
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I live out in the country and I love having a large farm across the street, it means fewer neighbors!  We have had some development in our area and new homeowners tend to have come from close-in suburbs.  Once they get here, they complain about the lack of services (we don't pay city income taxes, so we don't get many services), the lack of sidewalks and lighting and the manure from the farms. 

They do like all of the space available for riding horses though and just don't understand why the farmers get upset when they ride on the farmers' land without permission.  It's not like they are hurting that newly planted field!

tinkytinky

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26753 on: May 07, 2014, 03:35:03 PM »
Oh, how we can relate to the farm stories!
BG: I live on my DH's family farm, SIL is next door, and FIL next to her. We deal mostly with crops, but neighbor on the south side of the road has pasture with cattle. We live about 20 miles North of Major City. end BG

There is a knock on my door. When I answer standing there with her hand on her hip is City Transplant Neighbor Lady (CTNL).
Me (stepping onto the porch): Good afternoon! how are you?
CTNL: your need to get your cow.
Me: Sorry?
CTNL: your cow is by the road and I need to get thru.
Me: Oh, that must be Kind Neighbor's cow. I'll call his house right now.
CTNL: No, its yours. it's on your side of the road eating the grass. I could have hit it!
Me: Oh, it is getting close to the field. Let me call Kind Neighbor quickly,we don't want someone getting hurt, and we don't want his cow to founder in the corn.
CTNL: NO! ITS YOUR COW! IT STEPPED OVER YOUR FENCE! SEE OVER THERE? ITS ON THE GROUND.
Me: It's on the ground because we are replacing some fence posts. We don't have cows......
CTNL: get out there and get your cow!
Me (dialing the phone): I'm calling neighbor. He will be there in a few minutes to get his cow. *I tell neighbor about his cow being out and where it is.
CTNL: I demand you go get your cow. Now! I didn't move out here to herd cattle! I moved here to raise horses!
Me: Excuse me, please. I need to check on my children.
CTNL: Don't you step off of this porch! GET YOUR COW!
Me: Ma'am, as I said, it isn't my cow. If you are worried about it, you can drive your car to the crest of the hill, there, and wait until Kind Neighbor gets the cow back into his pasture.
CTNL: WELL! When I lived in Major City my neighbors never talked like this to me!
Me: well, with all due respect ma'am, your neighbors in Major City probably never had a cow either!

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jedikaiti

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26754 on: May 07, 2014, 04:08:33 PM »
Dad would slap Stepsister on the leg whenever she used her left foot on the brake.   She was learning to drive in summer and was wearing shorts.  She would have a red leg when she got out of the car.

That said, she did learn to drive and had her license by the end of the year.  Still, I didn't want him to teach me.   So I did take Driver Ed and my DH (then boyfriend) taught me to drive a stick.

That's why it's a very good idea to learn how to drive a stick shift in the first place. The left foot never gets used for anything but the clutch.


We've had the opposite experience.  I don't know how people learn to drive autos in the US, but here in the UK I was taught to drive one using my right foot only so my left foot isn't used at all.  My DH learned to drive in a manual, and when he started using an auto his left foot flapped around he found it difficult to remember not to lift his foot off the accelerator when the gears were changing (this can be felt, in an auto, IME).

US here, and when I learned to drive, it was on an automatic, and I was taught not to use my left foot at all, so it wouldn't be such a problem if/when I learned to drive a manual. No major problems transitioning between the two, aside form the occasional slip when I hit the brake looking for the clutch that isn't there in an auto. <G>
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26755 on: May 07, 2014, 04:11:41 PM »
A friend in college lived with her mom off campus since they lived relatively close to campus and as they usually got along it made sense for her to live at home rather than pay to live on campus. 

Anyway, her mom and several neighbors had chicken houses and I can't remember why but at a certain time of the year the whole area stunk to high heaven.  It was so awful that when I'd drive to her house I'd sit in the car, get all my things together, take a deep breath and hold it before running to her door and hoping they'd open it quickly.  That stench was one of the foulest I've smelled in my life!
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rose red

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26756 on: May 07, 2014, 04:23:23 PM »

CTNL: WELL! When I lived in Major City my neighbors never talked like this to me!


Probably because they already know she doesn't listen >:( ::)

Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26757 on: May 07, 2014, 04:43:07 PM »
Special Snowflakes of 'The Great Turkey Shoot'

The little town in which I grew up was almost rural.  People owned guns and hunted during deer season.  A major social event in town was the annual 'Thanksgiving'Turkey Shoot'. 

It was an innocent thing put together as a fund-raiser for the Volunteer Fire Department and the Volunteer Ambulance Corps.  Residents would pay a certain amount of money to fire their weapons at paper targets.  The best shots would then win a dressed and ready to cook turkey donated by a local butcher. There was also a bake sale, a rummage sale and and a refreshment stand. All proceeds went to the Fire House and the Ambulance Corps. The Turkey Shoot was very family-friendly. 

In the mid 1950s the Tappan Zee bridge opened.  Housing developments grew around us As quickly as mushroom farms.  Most of the new people were nice enough but they didn't understand local traditions. 

When notices of the 'Turkey Shoot' went out in the local newspaper and on the local radio station the
response was immediate and very vehement. 

New people thought that locals would be actually firing bullets or arrows at living birds. How barbaric was that? Could these sophisticated city people (who loved the idea of living in the country) allow their children to attend the slaughter of a 'Turkey Shoot'?

It took a while for the local media to calm that down but the message finally got across. 

In the spring, it was also traditional to have an Easter 'Ham Shoot'. The radio station had a lot of fun with that one. 

'Oh, the inhumanity of it!  People are firing at these innocent, little hams running in fear of their lives.'

After that first year,there were no protests against the Turkey or Ham shoots. 



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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26758 on: May 07, 2014, 04:57:52 PM »
Our neighborhood is right under the approach to Laguardia Airport.  During peak hours we can get a plane going by every 90 seconds or so.  Because the planes are still quite high, the noise isn't terrible but it's a fact of life if you choose to live here. 

Every few years, new arrivals try to get the airport approaches changed.  After all, they pay top dollar to live here and deserve peace and quiet, don't they?   

Sorry guys.  It ain't gonna happen.

They're already getting planes rerouted because they pay top dollar to live there: LaGuardia airport closes at something like 11 p.m., while JFK is open all night. I once had a flight into LGA delayed by weather, and landed at JFK. For me, that was a higher cab fare; I suspect it was rather more of an annoyance for any fellow-passengers who had cars in the long-term parking at LaGuardia.
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Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26759 on: May 07, 2014, 05:08:44 PM »
tinky tinky's story reminds me of when our neighbor banged on our door, demanding that we come get our cat out of her garden.  Now, as a backstory, our three cats (who all happen to be black) used to be outdoor cats, but they wandered into her garden once too many times and she threatened to kill them.  So, to keep the peace, they became indoor cats.

Me:  It's not our cat.  Ours are all indoors.
Her:  Yes, it is! 
Me:  It's not.  See?  All three of ours are sitting right there.
Her:  It HAS to be your cat - it's BLACK!

Because no-one besides us has ever owned a black cat, I guess.