News: All new forum theme!  See Forum Announcements for more information. 

  • May 04, 2015, 04:11:18 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6309467 times)

9 Members and 9 Guests are viewing this topic.

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2167
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27360 on: June 08, 2014, 02:14:48 AM »
I always thought they use lights and sirens to get to the patient, and may not use them taking the patient to the hospital unless it's urgent as the siren can annoy the patient in the back.

When I was in an ambulance for my miscarriage, it pulled up with lights and sirens but didn't on the way to the hospital.

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1311
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27361 on: June 08, 2014, 07:08:16 AM »
A peculiarly British instance of (at least potential) special-snowflakery here, I suppose; connected with an especial British oddity. The traditional way things work in British pubs is that one goes up to the bar (installed at waist / arms level), and orders one's drink(s) there. The bar-person fills the glasses as per request; the customer pays the cost of the drink(s) to the bar-person; then takes the drink(s) to their selected spot in the pub.

A spot which a few customers often select, is right at the bar, with their drinks resting on its level top; they spend their time in the pub, drinking actually at the bar -- usually standing up, sometimes sitting on tall stools. This of course makes it a little difficult for customers who want to order drinks -- which most of them will consume at chairs-at-tables elsewhere in the pub -- to reach the edge of the bar to get the drinks from the bar-persons. The whole thing is rather impractical, and to many, a tad annoying; but universally gets a pass as a bit of characterful time-honoured British strangeness. It is almost always negotiated in a good-humoured way: the drinkers at the bar move aside a little, to let the orderers get to where they need, and do their stuff.

A couple of weeks ago I encountered -- for the first time ever, to the best of my recollection -- an "advance" on this practice, which occasioned raised eyebrows on my part. In a quiet country pub, an oldish couple were sitting on high stools at the bar, eating a fairly elaborate cold lunch. It was not a highly extensive bar; perhaps eight or nine feet long, in two halves joining in the middle at a gentle angle. The couple and their meal were occupying one of the halves in its entirety. Admittedly it was late lunchtime, with few customers; my companion and I were able easily to get our drinks at the unoccupied half of the bar.

Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. One had to wonder: what if a large party had suddenly arrived, all wanting to order drinks -- with half the bar, "to be served at", being totally blocked to them?  Perhaps the lunching couple would have behaved graciously, and inconvenienced themselves in whatever way would have given the newcomers a fair shot at the whole bar. There is an inclination, though, to suspect that if they had been used to exercising consideration and empathy, they would have thought beforehand of the possible turn of events just described; and would have -- as nearly everyone having a meal in a pub, does -- eaten their lunch at a table.  I suppose I should give them the benefit of the doubt; but it is hard not to feel that a traditional oddity by which a degree of inconsiderateness is allowed and consented to, was being taken an unacceptable stage further.

BarensMom

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2647
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27362 on: June 08, 2014, 11:58:52 AM »
Besides which, they're working. And they're working for all of us. So if it saves them 15 minutes to get to wherever they're going, even if it isn't an emergency, I don't consider it to be out of line. It's police business.

Donut shop, well.....

My local firefighters don't use the sirens when they're taking the fire engine to the supermarket.


And neither do my local cops.  In the case of the cop car turning into the donut shop,  did you hang around long enough to see they buy donuts,  or is it possible they just used the parking lot as a turn around spot.   Where I live there are not enough cops and it's not unusual for cops on a routine job (like ambo escort) to be called for a robbery in progress where they are the closest police officers.  Or they could have been called to the donut shop because there was a call for them to go to the donut shop.       People think the police are turning into my C store for chicken or donuts, or a coffee break,  when in reality I've called them because some drunk is harassing the deli guy,  or me (the cashier) or the other customers.   Not every call the police respond to is an emergency.

Here's the lesson I learned about not making assumptions:

Years ago, I was visiting my mother and we were taking a walk to Andy's Donut Shop a few block away.  On the way, there were 3 police cars tearing down the street with sirens and lights.  I told Mom, "Oh, they just want to get to Andy's for their break."  When we arrived, the police were indeed at Andy's, but they had the owner in handcuffs.  They had arrested him for something to do with illegal weapons/ammo. 

Unfortunately for us, we didn't get our donuts that day.  I don't remember the resolution of the case, but Andy's did reopen after a few weeks. 

Now I'm wanting an apple fritter.

wolfie

  • I don't know what this is so I am putting random words here
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7481
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27363 on: June 08, 2014, 12:04:43 PM »
Besides which, they're working. And they're working for all of us. So if it saves them 15 minutes to get to wherever they're going, even if it isn't an emergency, I don't consider it to be out of line. It's police business.

Donut shop, well.....

My local firefighters don't use the sirens when they're taking the fire engine to the supermarket.


And neither do my local cops.  In the case of the cop car turning into the donut shop,  did you hang around long enough to see they buy donuts,  or is it possible they just used the parking lot as a turn around spot.   Where I live there are not enough cops and it's not unusual for cops on a routine job (like ambo escort) to be called for a robbery in progress where they are the closest police officers.  Or they could have been called to the donut shop because there was a call for them to go to the donut shop.       People think the police are turning into my C store for chicken or donuts, or a coffee break,  when in reality I've called them because some drunk is harassing the deli guy,  or me (the cashier) or the other customers.   Not every call the police respond to is an emergency.

Here's the lesson I learned about not making assumptions:

Years ago, I was visiting my mother and we were taking a walk to Andy's Donut Shop a few block away.  On the way, there were 3 police cars tearing down the street with sirens and lights.  I told Mom, "Oh, they just want to get to Andy's for their break."  When we arrived, the police were indeed at Andy's, but they had the owner in handcuffs.  They had arrested him for something to do with illegal weapons/ammo. 

Unfortunately for us, we didn't get our donuts that day.  I don't remember the resolution of the case, but Andy's did reopen after a few weeks. 

Now I'm wanting an apple fritter.

I also once made a joke about cops and donuts to a former cop and then he told me why cops tend to go to donut shops. Because in some places people don't like cops and might be inclined to do something to their food - and a beat cop can't go outside his area during his lunch break and be back in time. So they go to donut shops and the like because the food is prepared in front of them and so they know noone did anything to it.

Jocelyn

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3490
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27364 on: June 08, 2014, 12:36:31 PM »
Another reason why cops like doughnut shops is that they tend to be open long hours, so it's a place where third watch officers can get food and use the bathroom. And doughnut shops like cops, because their workers would be vulnerable to robbery, except that robbers know that cops might be dropping by at any time.
Plus, doughnuts are tasty snacks.  ::)

rose red

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8339
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27365 on: June 08, 2014, 12:38:46 PM »
I also once made a joke about cops and donuts to a former cop and then he told me why cops tend to go to donut shops. Because in some places people don't like cops and might be inclined to do something to their food - and a beat cop can't go outside his area during his lunch break and be back in time. So they go to donut shops and the like because the food is prepared in front of them and so they know noone did anything to it.

I was told that another reason was that years ago, before life was 24/7, donut shops were the only places open at off hours.

Jocelyn posted at the same time :).

Jocelyn

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3490
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27366 on: June 08, 2014, 12:42:29 PM »

Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. 

Perhaps they were eating at the bar because they wanted to converse with the bartender? You said it was after the rush, so maybe they were regulars and knew that there wasn't going to be so many people coming in at that time, that their meal would impair the bartender's ability to serve people who were arriving. And perhaps the bartender told them it would be OK.

Mary Lennox

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 276
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27367 on: June 08, 2014, 12:53:02 PM »
Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. One had to wonder: what if a large party had suddenly arrived, all wanting to order drinks -- with half the bar, "to be served at", being totally blocked to them?

Unless the bar tender magically multiplied or got extra hands, they were going to have to wait their turn anyway. Plus, as a former bar tender, a smaller serving area is much easier to tell who is next in line.

Margo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1993
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27368 on: June 08, 2014, 01:13:34 PM »
Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. One had to wonder: what if a large party had suddenly arrived, all wanting to order drinks -- with half the bar, "to be served at", being totally blocked to them?

Unless the bar tender magically multiplied or got extra hands, they were going to have to wait their turn anyway. Plus, as a former bar tender, a smaller serving area is much easier to tell who is next in line.

Yes, this would not raise the slightest blip on my 'SS  Radar' - the bar wasn't busy, they weren't obstructing anyone, and the staff had not issue with them being there. Unless it was an unusually busy oub, the liklihood of it suddenly being swamped to the extent that it would be an issue were probably pretty low, and the staff probably know better than anyone else whether that is likely to happen.

I have to say, I've never really found that people standing at the bar makes it particularly difficult to order - maybe you have to be bread to it ;)

greencat

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3238
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27369 on: June 08, 2014, 01:59:22 PM »
A peculiarly British instance of (at least potential) special-snowflakery here, I suppose; connected with an especial British oddity. The traditional way things work in British pubs is that one goes up to the bar (installed at waist / arms level), and orders one's drink(s) there. The bar-person fills the glasses as per request; the customer pays the cost of the drink(s) to the bar-person; then takes the drink(s) to their selected spot in the pub.

A spot which a few customers often select, is right at the bar, with their drinks resting on its level top; they spend their time in the pub, drinking actually at the bar -- usually standing up, sometimes sitting on tall stools. This of course makes it a little difficult for customers who want to order drinks -- which most of them will consume at chairs-at-tables elsewhere in the pub -- to reach the edge of the bar to get the drinks from the bar-persons. The whole thing is rather impractical, and to many, a tad annoying; but universally gets a pass as a bit of characterful time-honoured British strangeness. It is almost always negotiated in a good-humoured way: the drinkers at the bar move aside a little, to let the orderers get to where they need, and do their stuff.

A couple of weeks ago I encountered -- for the first time ever, to the best of my recollection -- an "advance" on this practice, which occasioned raised eyebrows on my part. In a quiet country pub, an oldish couple were sitting on high stools at the bar, eating a fairly elaborate cold lunch. It was not a highly extensive bar; perhaps eight or nine feet long, in two halves joining in the middle at a gentle angle. The couple and their meal were occupying one of the halves in its entirety. Admittedly it was late lunchtime, with few customers; my companion and I were able easily to get our drinks at the unoccupied half of the bar.

Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. One had to wonder: what if a large party had suddenly arrived, all wanting to order drinks -- with half the bar, "to be served at", being totally blocked to them?  Perhaps the lunching couple would have behaved graciously, and inconvenienced themselves in whatever way would have given the newcomers a fair shot at the whole bar. There is an inclination, though, to suspect that if they had been used to exercising consideration and empathy, they would have thought beforehand of the possible turn of events just described; and would have -- as nearly everyone having a meal in a pub, does -- eaten their lunch at a table.  I suppose I should give them the benefit of the doubt; but it is hard not to feel that a traditional oddity by which a degree of inconsiderateness is allowed and consented to, was being taken an unacceptable stage further.

Because there's a definite divide here between places that serve food as their primary business and places that serve alcohol as their primary business, there's only one place that I frequent that has a similar environment to a pub - the bar at the bowling alley where my trivia team plays.  It is primarily a bar, so it doesn't have proper waitstaff, and you either sit at the bar counter and eat and drink, which is perfectly normal, or you order at the bar counter and take your drinks and your food is brought out to you.   It is considered perfectly normal to eat and drink at the bar counter - probably because in restaurants with bars, you can sit at the bar and eat and drink and it doesn't disrupt service because the table orders are handled by waitstaff, and in bars that don't serve food, it's normal to sit at the bar to drink if they provide bar stools, which most do, and people ordering drinks either wedge in between the stools or go to an end of the bar to order.

marcel

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2068
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27370 on: June 08, 2014, 04:32:41 PM »
A peculiarly British instance of (at least potential) special-snowflakery here, I suppose; connected with an especial British oddity. The traditional way things work in British pubs is that one goes up to the bar (installed at waist / arms level), and orders one's drink(s) there. The bar-person fills the glasses as per request; the customer pays the cost of the drink(s) to the bar-person; then takes the drink(s) to their selected spot in the pub.

A spot which a few customers often select, is right at the bar, with their drinks resting on its level top; they spend their time in the pub, drinking actually at the bar -- usually standing up, sometimes sitting on tall stools. This of course makes it a little difficult for customers who want to order drinks -- which most of them will consume at chairs-at-tables elsewhere in the pub -- to reach the edge of the bar to get the drinks from the bar-persons. The whole thing is rather impractical, and to many, a tad annoying; but universally gets a pass as a bit of characterful time-honoured British strangeness. It is almost always negotiated in a good-humoured way: the drinkers at the bar move aside a little, to let the orderers get to where they need, and do their stuff.

A couple of weeks ago I encountered -- for the first time ever, to the best of my recollection -- an "advance" on this practice, which occasioned raised eyebrows on my part. In a quiet country pub, an oldish couple were sitting on high stools at the bar, eating a fairly elaborate cold lunch. It was not a highly extensive bar; perhaps eight or nine feet long, in two halves joining in the middle at a gentle angle. The couple and their meal were occupying one of the halves in its entirety. Admittedly it was late lunchtime, with few customers; my companion and I were able easily to get our drinks at the unoccupied half of the bar.

Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. One had to wonder: what if a large party had suddenly arrived, all wanting to order drinks -- with half the bar, "to be served at", being totally blocked to them?  Perhaps the lunching couple would have behaved graciously, and inconvenienced themselves in whatever way would have given the newcomers a fair shot at the whole bar. There is an inclination, though, to suspect that if they had been used to exercising consideration and empathy, they would have thought beforehand of the possible turn of events just described; and would have -- as nearly everyone having a meal in a pub, does -- eaten their lunch at a table.  I suppose I should give them the benefit of the doubt; but it is hard not to feel that a traditional oddity by which a degree of inconsiderateness is allowed and consented to, was being taken an unacceptable stage further.
I first wanted to point out that what you call a bit of time honoured British strangeness, is what I call normal almost anywhere I have ever been in any country.

Furthermore, i have seen people eat at the bar almost anywhere as well, so as long as the place has no rule against it, and noone requests they eat somewhere else and they refuse, nothing SS there either.
Wherever you go..... There you are.

zyrs

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2122
  • spiffily male.
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27371 on: June 08, 2014, 04:45:07 PM »
A peculiarly British instance of (at least potential) special-snowflakery here, I suppose; connected with an especial British oddity. The traditional way things work in British pubs is that one goes up to the bar (installed at waist / arms level), and orders one's drink(s) there. The bar-person fills the glasses as per request; the customer pays the cost of the drink(s) to the bar-person; then takes the drink(s) to their selected spot in the pub.

A spot which a few customers often select, is right at the bar, with their drinks resting on its level top; they spend their time in the pub, drinking actually at the bar -- usually standing up, sometimes sitting on tall stools. This of course makes it a little difficult for customers who want to order drinks -- which most of them will consume at chairs-at-tables elsewhere in the pub -- to reach the edge of the bar to get the drinks from the bar-persons. The whole thing is rather impractical, and to many, a tad annoying; but universally gets a pass as a bit of characterful time-honoured British strangeness. It is almost always negotiated in a good-humoured way: the drinkers at the bar move aside a little, to let the orderers get to where they need, and do their stuff.

A couple of weeks ago I encountered -- for the first time ever, to the best of my recollection -- an "advance" on this practice, which occasioned raised eyebrows on my part. In a quiet country pub, an oldish couple were sitting on high stools at the bar, eating a fairly elaborate cold lunch. It was not a highly extensive bar; perhaps eight or nine feet long, in two halves joining in the middle at a gentle angle. The couple and their meal were occupying one of the halves in its entirety. Admittedly it was late lunchtime, with few customers; my companion and I were able easily to get our drinks at the unoccupied half of the bar.

Perhaps I'm being too hard on these folk in seeing them as could-be SS's: but, two people being established side by side at the bar, with a meal "in sundry parts", made it in this location, all but impossible for them to move aside at all, to let a drink-orderer reach that part of the bar. One had to wonder: what if a large party had suddenly arrived, all wanting to order drinks -- with half the bar, "to be served at", being totally blocked to them?  Perhaps the lunching couple would have behaved graciously, and inconvenienced themselves in whatever way would have given the newcomers a fair shot at the whole bar. There is an inclination, though, to suspect that if they had been used to exercising consideration and empathy, they would have thought beforehand of the possible turn of events just described; and would have -- as nearly everyone having a meal in a pub, does -- eaten their lunch at a table.  I suppose I should give them the benefit of the doubt; but it is hard not to feel that a traditional oddity by which a degree of inconsiderateness is allowed and consented to, was being taken an unacceptable stage further.

Because there's a definite divide here between places that serve food as their primary business and places that serve alcohol as their primary business, there's only one place that I frequent that has a similar environment to a pub - the bar at the bowling alley where my trivia team plays.  It is primarily a bar, so it doesn't have proper waitstaff, and you either sit at the bar counter and eat and drink, which is perfectly normal, or you order at the bar counter and take your drinks and your food is brought out to you.   It is considered perfectly normal to eat and drink at the bar counter - probably because in restaurants with bars, you can sit at the bar and eat and drink and it doesn't disrupt service because the table orders are handled by waitstaff, and in bars that don't serve food, it's normal to sit at the bar to drink if they provide bar stools, which most do, and people ordering drinks either wedge in between the stools or go to an end of the bar to order.

Most places I have been to with a "order at the bar" setup (all of them in the USA) have a designated area to order drinks from the bar.  If you aren't sitting at a stool  at the bar already you walk to that area, if someone is in front of you you wait in a line, and you order your drinks in that spot.  It is usually very well-marked.

nayberry

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 922
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27372 on: June 08, 2014, 05:08:46 PM »
former barmaid opinion,  if there are seats along the bar then they are perfectly entitled to sit and eat there.
we didn't have stools as the bar would've gotten too crowded so people came up, stood wherever along the bar and ordered drinks/foods/complain that the jukebox wasn't on etc etc.

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1311
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27373 on: June 09, 2014, 07:24:17 AM »
In view of the overall sentiments expressed in responses to my post -- am tending to feel that it's perhaps me who am the peevish, difficult character wanting everything to be his way; and that drinking prolongedly, positioned at the bar, is maybe not even a partcularly British thing ! -- and the general "take" seems to be, that I'm being too hard on the poor old pair in question.

While taking on board, the views mentioned above; I'd mildly say in my defence, that a good many fellow-Britons of my acquaintance feel, as I do, that the drinking-at-the-bar and thus making access a bit difficult for those buying drinks at said bar, is annoying (though well below white-hot-rage level) for those who wish just to buy drinks and sit elsewhere in the hostelry. A letter to the editor in the latest issue of the house magazine of one of Britain's pub chains, reads as follows: "The only complaint I have [about your pubs] is the number of customers who, once they have been served, stand at the bar, drinking and talking, while other customers are trying to get served, even when there are tables and chairs begging to be occupied. It is unnecessary and extremely annoying. I have seen customers walking out because of these ignorant people.  Please let it be stopped."

The editor's response was, basically, blandly saying not much; but the just-quoted, would seem to indicate that there are Brits who find the business of consumers of the wares, hogging the bar to consume them there; a good deal more irritating than even my friends and I, do.

123sandy

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 548
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27374 on: June 09, 2014, 07:33:57 AM »
In view of the overall sentiments expressed in responses to my post -- am tending to feel that it's perhaps me who am the peevish, difficult character wanting everything to be his way; and that drinking prolongedly, positioned at the bar, is maybe not even a partcularly British thing ! -- and the general "take" seems to be, that I'm being too hard on the poor old pair in question.

While taking on board, the views mentioned above; I'd mildly say in my defence, that a good many fellow-Britons of my acquaintance feel, as I do, that the drinking-at-the-bar and thus making access a bit difficult for those buying drinks at said bar, is annoying (though well below white-hot-rage level) for those who wish just to buy drinks and sit elsewhere in the hostelry. A letter to the editor in the latest issue of the house magazine of one of Britain's pub chains, reads as follows: "The only complaint I have [about your pubs] is the number of customers who, once they have been served, stand at the bar, drinking and talking, while other customers are trying to get served, even when there are tables and chairs begging to be occupied. It is unnecessary and extremely annoying. I have seen customers walking out because of these ignorant people.  Please let it be stopped."

The editor's response was, basically, blandly saying not much; but the just-quoted, would seem to indicate that there are Brits who find the business of consumers of the wares, hogging the bar to consume them there; a good deal more irritating than even my friends and I, do.

"Ignorant people"???

I've been drinking in British bars for 35 years and people have always stood/sat at the bar without it causing problems. I've also worked in bars and been able to serve people without a problem. When did this become a big thing?