Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5095581 times)

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LadyClaire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27420 on: June 13, 2014, 08:26:38 AM »
Last night at a restaurant, a family had their toddler with them. I'd say the kid was probably a little younger than 2 years old. They were sitting at a table, with an empty booth behind them. They plunked the toddler into the empty booth and ignored him while they ate. The kid was grabbing the rolled cutlery and tossing it, climbing up onto the table, and knocking over the salt and pepper shakers all while squealing at the top of his lungs. As we were getting up to leave a rather irritated looking manager was heading in the direction of their table. Hopefully to tell them to get their kid out of the booth, because by that point it had been more or less trashed.

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27421 on: June 13, 2014, 09:03:57 AM »
On the flip side of people who try to cut in line at the doctor's office are those that don't understand triag.


Someone who comes in having anaphylactic allergic reaction gets jumped to the front of the line in most circumstances. I can't tell you how many times someone has yelled at me or my family because I got rushed to the back and put on O2 and a O2 monitor before the doc even got there. I get that being in an ER can be scary. But the staff can't tell you my information. Honestly I think those experiences are part of the reason I'm so up front about both the peanut and skin disorder. My parents would calmly tell the agitated person, "My daughter's throat is swelling closed and her heart is being overloaded due to a life threatening allergic reaction. If they don't put her on Oxygen now she will suffocate. The person backed down almost every time. Triage people would thank my parents for handling the situation. On the flip side my parents never went off on the triage people when they had to wait for sis's broken bones to be handled.


After being treated I'm supposed to follow up with my GP. Not so much now but when I was  kid that meant no waiting room. Dr. George had 3 regular treatment rooms then one off to the other side of the hall. We would walk in and one of the the nurses would whisk me back to that one to the side and close the door, before mom could even check me in. Other Moms would start complaining we were here first. Why is she going back now. It didn't mean we got seen before our turn. That room was for patients who were immune suppressed for some reason. In my case because of being on steroids.  Sis wasn't allowed in. She had to stay in the waiting room or sit on a bench in the hallway. Again my Mom would explain that I was temporary immune suppressed and had to be isolated while we waited our turn. When we left, we weren't out the door before someone started scrubbing that room down.
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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27422 on: June 13, 2014, 09:06:06 AM »
Likewise someone going into sepsis from a raging infection that has gone untreated.

I think people get fixated on the numbering systems used in certain settings and the idea that everyone has to wait their turn.

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27423 on: June 13, 2014, 09:36:47 AM »
Likewise someone going into sepsis from a raging infection that has gone untreated.

I think people get fixated on the numbering systems used in certain settings and the idea that everyone has to wait their turn.
And the fact they are scared for their family member. I have to remember that most people don't make into double digit er visits before they leave high school.
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MrsVandy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27424 on: June 13, 2014, 09:58:32 AM »
I ran in to a not understanding triage snowflake a few nights ago.
I had to go to the ER because I was having some complications after having our baby. Since I was 3 days postpartum and had my newborn with me, I was sent to the front of the line.
 As I'm headed back to the exam area, a guy in the waiting room gets in the nurse's face and aggressively says "Hey, she's after me! I've been waiting an hour already."
The nurse handle it quite well she just said something like how "Sir we realize you have been waiting but she's here for something more serious and needs to be first. You will be seen shortly"
To be fair in my area 8 hour long waits are not uncommon, so this guy seemed extra SS considering. Also there were only 3 other people waiting so he really wouldn't have to wait much longer.

*I'm fine, the complication was minor although still ranked higher then whatever he was in for.





















wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27425 on: June 13, 2014, 10:00:56 AM »
I think it wasn't the check writing or even the fumbling in her purse for the checkbook that was the special snowflakiness.  I think it was the adding on extra things to her purchase, pushing it into an amount that she, being a manager at that store, would know would require manager approval, and doing so piecemeal so that the transaction had to be recalculated multiple times, that made her a special snowflake.

This.  She knew how to make the transaction quicker and decidedly chose not to, purposefully inconveniencing those around her.


From a cashiers point of view, this person was SS. It is a minor irritation for someone to write a check, however, the express lanes are just that, fast service.

I don't mind if you are writing a check, but, if you are digging through your purse, looking for your checkbook, then, you fill in the register first, then you write the check, then decide to add things to the order, you are not only irritating the cashier, but the people that are in line, and lining up behind. The really grumpy customers will then yell at me, because the person causing the delay has delayed them even more.

I don't know how other stores work, but cashiers are timed on how long it takes to start and finish a customers order, and when someone takes that much time, it affects negatively on the cashier. Customers don't know that, but I will tell them if they ask.

Or she's scatterbrained.

Sorry, I'm not on board with this verdict.

RegionMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27426 on: June 13, 2014, 10:54:59 AM »
In HS, I had cut myself at a fast food job, and needed stitches.  I had received the numbing shot, and the needle and thread items were on the tray, ready to go, when an immeidate emergency came in to the ER.

After an hour or so, jsut chatting with my fellow "bunk mates," someone came back to do the stitching. 
"Hey, I can feel that!!" 
"But you already received your pain shot?!"
"Yes, long enough that it has worn off."
"Oh."
 checks chart. 
Shoots me again.

barely any  scar now. 

I did not mind waiting. 

When DS was under 2, he was having a breathing issue.  They took him back without even asking his name, let alone our insurance information.  Fastest I have ever had treatment!

(He is fine, 18 now, heading off to college.  It was "just" croup.)


On to a sort of special snowflake, thinking of waiting-

I had to renew my drivers licence a few years ago, and for some reason, there was an intimidating cop at the front door.  (Have had kids get their licensees in the meantime, and have never seen a cop in that same station since)

"State your social security number Ma'm!"
"555-"
"NO!  Not your phone number, your social!"
"555-"
"Did you not understand me?  Your social security number!"

since I was at a legal govt' office doing legal govt paper work, I had my card on me, and pulled out, to show him that YES, the first three numbers I had stated were correct.

And, I was perturbed enough when he brushed me off with a sneer of disbelief, to respond,
"yes, I looked the entire country over and decided that I had to settle in the county that has the telephone area code the exact same three digits as the first three of my social, jsut to make memorizing the numbers easier."

He just looked on and barked out to the next person, and I walked in. 

if he had not been on a power trip of barking orders, or given me time to pull my card (Usually it is done inside, at the desk/check-in) he would have saved himself the time and my (admittedly) snarky, comment. 

 

« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 10:57:07 AM by RegionMom »
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Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27427 on: June 13, 2014, 11:03:40 AM »
Why was there  a cop there in the first place, demanding people's SS#?

The first three numbers of my Social Security# is the same as the first three of my driver's license.  DL# is not based on SS#, but on a soundex of the first few letters of my last name.  So by the cop's thinking, I married DH and moved to Maryland just to get those 3 numbers to match.
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Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27428 on: June 13, 2014, 11:16:52 AM »
I've had similar misunderstandings about my name.  My last name is hyphenated, so often when someone asks for my last name and I start to say "Piggott-Higgenbottom" (for example), they'll think that I'm giving my full name and will bark "I said last name!"  "That is my last name!  It's hyphenated!"

I've now learned to say "My last name is Piggott (pause) hyphen Higgenbottom."  Saves some confusion.  :)

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27429 on: June 13, 2014, 11:17:59 AM »
Quote
Why was there  a cop there in the first place, demanding people's SS#?

Yeha, that's weird.
What was he doing with those numbers? Just making you state them aloud?

Was he checking them against a list or something?

Or was he just making sure that everybody could -answer- that question, so he could weed out people who didn't have their SSN either memorized or with them, so they wouldn't waste time in the line?

Or so he could find people who didn't have a SSN, such as undocumented persons?

goldilocks

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27430 on: June 13, 2014, 11:20:26 AM »
I think it wasn't the check writing or even the fumbling in her purse for the checkbook that was the special snowflakiness.  I think it was the adding on extra things to her purchase, pushing it into an amount that she, being a manager at that store, would know would require manager approval, and doing so piecemeal so that the transaction had to be recalculated multiple times, that made her a special snowflake.

This.  She knew how to make the transaction quicker and decidedly chose not to, purposefully inconveniencing those around her.



From a cashiers point of view, this person was SS. It is a minor irritation for someone to write a check, however, the express lanes are just that, fast service.

I don't mind if you are writing a check, but, if you are digging through your purse, looking for your checkbook, then, you fill in the register first, then you write the check, then decide to add things to the order, you are not only irritating the cashier, but the people that are in line, and lining up behind. The really grumpy customers will then yell at me, because the person causing the delay has delayed them even more.

I don't know how other stores work, but cashiers are timed on how long it takes to start and finish a customers order, and when someone takes that much time, it affects negatively on the cashier. Customers don't know that, but I will tell them if they ask.

Or she's scatterbrained.

Sorry, I'm not on board with this verdict.

My husband's elderly aunt was like this.   Now, I realize that you can be sort of caught up in watching the scanner so you don't realize that you need to write a check until she's done.   THat was not the case with aunt.  She would not even unzip her purse until the cashier told her the total.   while standing in line, we'd remind her to take out her checkbook and start filling in the store name, date, etc.   

Her reply "I don't do that.   They (the people behind her) can just wait".

That is a special snowflake.  She had no reason for inconveniencing those around her, only that she just didn't care and wanted to do it her way.

hjaye

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27431 on: June 13, 2014, 11:26:15 AM »
I had to renew my drivers licence a few years ago, and for some reason, there was an intimidating cop at the front door.  (Have had kids get their licensees in the meantime, and have never seen a cop in that same station since)

"State your social security number Ma'm!"
"555-"
"NO!  Not your phone number, your social!"
"555-"
"Did you not understand me?  Your social security number!"


I don't know exactly how many years ago this was, but I know if I had been asked to do that anytime within the past 10 years I would have refused.  There is no way I'm going tell anyone what my social security number is in public.  You never know who is listening, and it just takes being in ear shot of the wrong person to create a world of trouble for me.  Besides, how would the cop know you were telling the truth?  If he's  not using the number to look up your name and verify who you are, a person could make up any number.  Three numbers - two numbers - four numbers.

A bit more off topic, but I don't know if anyone remembers the SS cards they gave out back when I first got mine (early 60's) it said right on the front of the card "Not to be used for identification purposes"  I don't know when they took it off, but I've had to get my card replaced around twenty or so years ago, and it's definitely not  on there now.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27432 on: June 13, 2014, 01:49:09 PM »
My DH's SS card says that, he was born in 1971 and got it in his teens.

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27433 on: June 13, 2014, 02:31:44 PM »
It's still not truly identification. It has to be paired with an actual ID, and even then all it proves is that you have an SSN.

http://www.nationalnotary.org/bulletin/best_practices/tips/hotline_tip_is_social_security_card_a_valid_id.html

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27434 on: June 13, 2014, 05:03:13 PM »
Likewise someone going into sepsis from a raging infection that has gone untreated.

I think people get fixated on the numbering systems used in certain settings and the idea that everyone has to wait their turn.
And the fact they are scared for their family member. I have to remember that most people don't make into double digit er visits before they leave high school.

It can also be that, while there's no life-threatening emergency, it's hard work to stay at the waiting room for that long.  When my oldest was around 1, she had a high white blood cell count and we were sent to the ER.  12 hours later, we were finally seen.  Know what it's like to try to keep a starving-to-death (or so she is acting like) 1-year-old at the ER for 12 hours, missing lunch, dinner, naps and bedtime galore, etc.?  We did wait patiently, because I know that people with dire emergencies come in and need to be seen first, but I'll admit that I was very, very upset with my doctor when I found out that we could have gone to an urgent care clinic instead of the children's hospital in downtown DC with the 12 hour wait (and an 11-hour wait the next night for "follow up").