Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5627406 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27420 on: June 13, 2014, 09:36:47 AM »
Likewise someone going into sepsis from a raging infection that has gone untreated.

I think people get fixated on the numbering systems used in certain settings and the idea that everyone has to wait their turn.
And the fact they are scared for their family member. I have to remember that most people don't make into double digit er visits before they leave high school.
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MrsVandy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27421 on: June 13, 2014, 09:58:32 AM »
I ran in to a not understanding triage snowflake a few nights ago.
I had to go to the ER because I was having some complications after having our baby. Since I was 3 days postpartum and had my newborn with me, I was sent to the front of the line.
 As I'm headed back to the exam area, a guy in the waiting room gets in the nurse's face and aggressively says "Hey, she's after me! I've been waiting an hour already."
The nurse handle it quite well she just said something like how "Sir we realize you have been waiting but she's here for something more serious and needs to be first. You will be seen shortly"
To be fair in my area 8 hour long waits are not uncommon, so this guy seemed extra SS considering. Also there were only 3 other people waiting so he really wouldn't have to wait much longer.

*I'm fine, the complication was minor although still ranked higher then whatever he was in for.





















wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27422 on: June 13, 2014, 10:00:56 AM »
I think it wasn't the check writing or even the fumbling in her purse for the checkbook that was the special snowflakiness.  I think it was the adding on extra things to her purchase, pushing it into an amount that she, being a manager at that store, would know would require manager approval, and doing so piecemeal so that the transaction had to be recalculated multiple times, that made her a special snowflake.

This.  She knew how to make the transaction quicker and decidedly chose not to, purposefully inconveniencing those around her.


From a cashiers point of view, this person was SS. It is a minor irritation for someone to write a check, however, the express lanes are just that, fast service.

I don't mind if you are writing a check, but, if you are digging through your purse, looking for your checkbook, then, you fill in the register first, then you write the check, then decide to add things to the order, you are not only irritating the cashier, but the people that are in line, and lining up behind. The really grumpy customers will then yell at me, because the person causing the delay has delayed them even more.

I don't know how other stores work, but cashiers are timed on how long it takes to start and finish a customers order, and when someone takes that much time, it affects negatively on the cashier. Customers don't know that, but I will tell them if they ask.

Or she's scatterbrained.

Sorry, I'm not on board with this verdict.

RegionMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27423 on: June 13, 2014, 10:54:59 AM »
In HS, I had cut myself at a fast food job, and needed stitches.  I had received the numbing shot, and the needle and thread items were on the tray, ready to go, when an immeidate emergency came in to the ER.

After an hour or so, jsut chatting with my fellow "bunk mates," someone came back to do the stitching. 
"Hey, I can feel that!!" 
"But you already received your pain shot?!"
"Yes, long enough that it has worn off."
"Oh."
 checks chart. 
Shoots me again.

barely any  scar now. 

I did not mind waiting. 

When DS was under 2, he was having a breathing issue.  They took him back without even asking his name, let alone our insurance information.  Fastest I have ever had treatment!

(He is fine, 18 now, heading off to college.  It was "just" croup.)


On to a sort of special snowflake, thinking of waiting-

I had to renew my drivers licence a few years ago, and for some reason, there was an intimidating cop at the front door.  (Have had kids get their licensees in the meantime, and have never seen a cop in that same station since)

"State your social security number Ma'm!"
"555-"
"NO!  Not your phone number, your social!"
"555-"
"Did you not understand me?  Your social security number!"

since I was at a legal govt' office doing legal govt paper work, I had my card on me, and pulled out, to show him that YES, the first three numbers I had stated were correct.

And, I was perturbed enough when he brushed me off with a sneer of disbelief, to respond,
"yes, I looked the entire country over and decided that I had to settle in the county that has the telephone area code the exact same three digits as the first three of my social, jsut to make memorizing the numbers easier."

He just looked on and barked out to the next person, and I walked in. 

if he had not been on a power trip of barking orders, or given me time to pull my card (Usually it is done inside, at the desk/check-in) he would have saved himself the time and my (admittedly) snarky, comment. 

 

« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 10:57:07 AM by RegionMom »
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Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27424 on: June 13, 2014, 11:03:40 AM »
Why was there  a cop there in the first place, demanding people's SS#?

The first three numbers of my Social Security# is the same as the first three of my driver's license.  DL# is not based on SS#, but on a soundex of the first few letters of my last name.  So by the cop's thinking, I married DH and moved to Maryland just to get those 3 numbers to match.
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Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27425 on: June 13, 2014, 11:16:52 AM »
I've had similar misunderstandings about my name.  My last name is hyphenated, so often when someone asks for my last name and I start to say "Piggott-Higgenbottom" (for example), they'll think that I'm giving my full name and will bark "I said last name!"  "That is my last name!  It's hyphenated!"

I've now learned to say "My last name is Piggott (pause) hyphen Higgenbottom."  Saves some confusion.  :)

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27426 on: June 13, 2014, 11:17:59 AM »
Quote
Why was there  a cop there in the first place, demanding people's SS#?

Yeha, that's weird.
What was he doing with those numbers? Just making you state them aloud?

Was he checking them against a list or something?

Or was he just making sure that everybody could -answer- that question, so he could weed out people who didn't have their SSN either memorized or with them, so they wouldn't waste time in the line?

Or so he could find people who didn't have a SSN, such as undocumented persons?

goldilocks

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27427 on: June 13, 2014, 11:20:26 AM »
I think it wasn't the check writing or even the fumbling in her purse for the checkbook that was the special snowflakiness.  I think it was the adding on extra things to her purchase, pushing it into an amount that she, being a manager at that store, would know would require manager approval, and doing so piecemeal so that the transaction had to be recalculated multiple times, that made her a special snowflake.

This.  She knew how to make the transaction quicker and decidedly chose not to, purposefully inconveniencing those around her.



From a cashiers point of view, this person was SS. It is a minor irritation for someone to write a check, however, the express lanes are just that, fast service.

I don't mind if you are writing a check, but, if you are digging through your purse, looking for your checkbook, then, you fill in the register first, then you write the check, then decide to add things to the order, you are not only irritating the cashier, but the people that are in line, and lining up behind. The really grumpy customers will then yell at me, because the person causing the delay has delayed them even more.

I don't know how other stores work, but cashiers are timed on how long it takes to start and finish a customers order, and when someone takes that much time, it affects negatively on the cashier. Customers don't know that, but I will tell them if they ask.

Or she's scatterbrained.

Sorry, I'm not on board with this verdict.

My husband's elderly aunt was like this.   Now, I realize that you can be sort of caught up in watching the scanner so you don't realize that you need to write a check until she's done.   THat was not the case with aunt.  She would not even unzip her purse until the cashier told her the total.   while standing in line, we'd remind her to take out her checkbook and start filling in the store name, date, etc.   

Her reply "I don't do that.   They (the people behind her) can just wait".

That is a special snowflake.  She had no reason for inconveniencing those around her, only that she just didn't care and wanted to do it her way.

hjaye

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27428 on: June 13, 2014, 11:26:15 AM »
I had to renew my drivers licence a few years ago, and for some reason, there was an intimidating cop at the front door.  (Have had kids get their licensees in the meantime, and have never seen a cop in that same station since)

"State your social security number Ma'm!"
"555-"
"NO!  Not your phone number, your social!"
"555-"
"Did you not understand me?  Your social security number!"


I don't know exactly how many years ago this was, but I know if I had been asked to do that anytime within the past 10 years I would have refused.  There is no way I'm going tell anyone what my social security number is in public.  You never know who is listening, and it just takes being in ear shot of the wrong person to create a world of trouble for me.  Besides, how would the cop know you were telling the truth?  If he's  not using the number to look up your name and verify who you are, a person could make up any number.  Three numbers - two numbers - four numbers.

A bit more off topic, but I don't know if anyone remembers the SS cards they gave out back when I first got mine (early 60's) it said right on the front of the card "Not to be used for identification purposes"  I don't know when they took it off, but I've had to get my card replaced around twenty or so years ago, and it's definitely not  on there now.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27429 on: June 13, 2014, 01:49:09 PM »
My DH's SS card says that, he was born in 1971 and got it in his teens.

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27430 on: June 13, 2014, 02:31:44 PM »
It's still not truly identification. It has to be paired with an actual ID, and even then all it proves is that you have an SSN.

http://www.nationalnotary.org/bulletin/best_practices/tips/hotline_tip_is_social_security_card_a_valid_id.html

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27431 on: June 13, 2014, 05:03:13 PM »
Likewise someone going into sepsis from a raging infection that has gone untreated.

I think people get fixated on the numbering systems used in certain settings and the idea that everyone has to wait their turn.
And the fact they are scared for their family member. I have to remember that most people don't make into double digit er visits before they leave high school.

It can also be that, while there's no life-threatening emergency, it's hard work to stay at the waiting room for that long.  When my oldest was around 1, she had a high white blood cell count and we were sent to the ER.  12 hours later, we were finally seen.  Know what it's like to try to keep a starving-to-death (or so she is acting like) 1-year-old at the ER for 12 hours, missing lunch, dinner, naps and bedtime galore, etc.?  We did wait patiently, because I know that people with dire emergencies come in and need to be seen first, but I'll admit that I was very, very upset with my doctor when I found out that we could have gone to an urgent care clinic instead of the children's hospital in downtown DC with the 12 hour wait (and an 11-hour wait the next night for "follow up").

judecat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27432 on: June 13, 2014, 10:22:50 PM »
It's still not truly identification. It has to be paired with an actual ID, and even then all it proves is that you have an SSN.

http://www.nationalnotary.org/bulletin/best_practices/tips/hotline_tip_is_social_security_card_a_valid_id.html


The social security card itself is not ID,  but the number sure is used as proof of identity now days. 
Back in the late 60's,  early 70's the only thing the number was used for was for your social security account.  Someone had the not too bright idea to replace military serial numbers with you SS#,  which was printed or written along with your name and rank on every article of your uniform,  and gear.  But it still wasn't used for anything else.
10 Years later you needed your SS# to get utilities,  and a former friend couldn't use her own because of over due bills,  so she used mine,  which she had gotten off of the duffel bag that I gave to her son when I got out of the army.  And she got a couple credit cards in my name using the same information,  and went to the DMV and got a photo ID again using my information.  (So she had a drivers licence in her own name,  and a Photo ID in mine.  I had a non photo drivers licence from another state.   First I start getting bills from collection agencies,  then I give up my drivers license and got to get a state ID,  and find out that I already have one,  with the picture and address of my former friend.  Took almost 15 years to straighten out that mess.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27433 on: June 14, 2014, 12:11:50 PM »
Quote
Someone had the not too bright idea to replace military serial numbers with you SS#,  which was printed or written along with your name and rank on every article of your uniform, and gear.  But it still wasn't used for anything else.
As some of you know, Mr. Nutrax recently pass away. He turned out to be a major packrat who saved many things, including every letter he ever received while in the Army in the mid 1960s. Every one of the envelopes is addressed to "[Military Rank] Nutrax, 000-0000-000."

Since I am receiving certain benefits based on Mr. Nutrax's history, his SSN is still "live," so I had to make sure all those envelopes went into the shred box instead of the recycle box.

Which actually belongs more in the Scammer thread.

So, I'll add the Carry On Hall of Shame. I'm not sure this is the best way to go about it, but it's a newspaper columnist's efforts to call attention to people who insist on taking huge pieces of luggage as carry on.

And this from the "overheard in public" section of a SF Chronicle column. Snowflakey-ness would depend on the exact demands made on guests, although the costume part comes close. "Did you get our invitation to the birthday party? We hired a limo, rented a red carpet and are asking all the kids to come as their favorite celebrities. Can't believe she's turning 3.""

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Dindrane

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #27434 on: June 14, 2014, 02:01:21 PM »
So, I'll add the Carry On Hall of Shame. I'm not sure this is the best way to go about it, but it's a newspaper columnist's efforts to call attention to people who insist on taking huge pieces of luggage as carry on.

Some of the pictures on there show legitimately ridiculous and oversized luggage taken as carry ons, but one thing that I can't quite get behind is the idea that it's automatically rude and unacceptable to have a rolling suitcase and a backpack or small duffel bag.

I kind of figure that airlines can enforce the fact that only one carry on gets to go in the overhead bin, and anything you're calling your "personal item" should fit under the seat in front of you safely. But most backpacks, large purses, or small duffel bags do fit with room to spare, and some of the smaller rolling bags will even fit under the seat.

I think it's snowflakey to bring more than two bags, or bring more than one that can't fit under the seat, or put both bags into the overhead (unless the flight is empty and there's lots of space, but that almost never happens these days). But just having two bags as large as the airline allows is not by itself rude.

I end up bringing a rolling suitcase (not small, but not the largest size allowed) and a tote-bag-as-purse most of the time, just because I no longer trust airlines not to delay my bags, take things out of them, or keep them dry after a variety of experiences. I therefore keep everything I truly care about with me, along with stuff to do on the flight and a change of at least underwear/socks/shirt and my pajamas in case my bag is delayed. That typically fills my two bags completely full. However, my rolling suitcase fits easily in all overheads that fit any rolling suitcases (and I gate check it on planes too small to accommodate them), and I keep my tote bag under the seat, along with my coat if I have one with me.