Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5376834 times)

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songbird

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28095 on: July 22, 2014, 08:57:05 PM »
I know I'm a bit late, but I have to weigh in on the daughter driving the car story.

I am the mother of a young woman who has had several minor accidents. 

I am also licensed to practice law in NY.


And my daughter was sued as a result of one of those minor accidents.  I wasn't with her at the time of the accident, she was 19, and it wasn't until she was being deposed that I found out what she said to the other driver.  She told the other driver that she had been having problems with her brakes.

That, my friends, is what a lawyer calls "an admission against interest."

So honestly, had I been in the car when my teenage daughter had the accident, I probably would not have allowed her to speak to the other driver, and I probably would have handled the exchange of information myself.

That doesn't excuse rudeness, of course.  I would have been polite about it.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28096 on: July 22, 2014, 10:56:00 PM »
Am I allowed to post an article here?  I thought #16 (the first one posted) was rather pertinent to special snowflakes.  :)  http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_244_16-lessons-you-wish-theyd-taught-in-school/  (cracked.com is generally NSFW and may have offensive stuff/language)

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28097 on: July 23, 2014, 08:53:02 AM »
I know I'm a bit late, but I have to weigh in on the daughter driving the car story.

I am the mother of a young woman who has had several minor accidents. 

I am also licensed to practice law in NY.


And my daughter was sued as a result of one of those minor accidents.  I wasn't with her at the time of the accident, she was 19, and it wasn't until she was being deposed that I found out what she said to the other driver.  She told the other driver that she had been having problems with her brakes.

That, my friends, is what a lawyer calls "an admission against interest."

So honestly, had I been in the car when my teenage daughter had the accident, I probably would not have allowed her to speak to the other driver, and I probably would have handled the exchange of information myself.

That doesn't excuse rudeness, of course.  I would have been polite about it.

I don't want to get into legalities, but it is pretty bad as a motorist to drive a vehicle with a safety hazard.

bloo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28098 on: July 23, 2014, 09:28:37 AM »
I know I'm a bit late, but I have to weigh in on the daughter driving the car story.

I am the mother of a young woman who has had several minor accidents. 

I am also licensed to practice law in NY.


And my daughter was sued as a result of one of those minor accidents...

-snip

...So honestly, had I been in the car when my teenage daughter had the accident, I probably would not have allowed her to speak to the other driver, and I probably would have handled the exchange of information myself.

That doesn't excuse rudeness, of course.  I would have been polite about it.

I don't want to get into legalities, but it is pretty bad as a motorist to drive a vehicle with a safety hazard.

Yeah, I don't think it would have been good to protect someone from the consequences of neglect or poor decisions - in this case driving a vehicle that one knows is unsafe. In your DD's inexperience she owned up to her own culpability and that's not a bad thing. Going forward your DD, no doubt, understands the importance of proper vehicle maintenance. I'm sure she drives more carefully now. I'd be pretty nervous to ride with someone young that had many minor accidents.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28099 on: July 23, 2014, 09:50:14 AM »
This guy is, unfortunately, all too common, but . . .

the dude in line at the airport yesterday.  We were all standing around at the gate, waiting for our delayed plane.  The woman next to me was reading something on her phone and had headphones in - the universal symbol for "come hit on me," right?  Yeah.

Dude: "Hey, so are you from [destination city]?"

Woman: [doesn't acknowledge him]

Dude: [reaches to tug on her headphone cord] "Hey, are you from [destination city]?"

Woman: [taking earbud out and giving him the side-eye] "Hmmm?  Yes."

Dude: "Whereabouts?"

Woman: "Um, [suburb.]"

Dude: "Oh."

Woman: [goes to put earbud back in]

Dude: "So where are you from, like, originally?"

Woman: [taking it back out] "Pardon?"

Dude: "I mean, like, what kind of hispanic are you?"

Woman: [very curtly] "Cuban.  Excuse me."  [Puts earbud back in, walks away to stand in a different part of the line]


I felt like trying to get his attention and pointing out all the ways he was being a complete [eHell-non-acceptable-word].  Seriously: she's not there to entertain you.  She's clearly not interested in you.  She's busy doing something else.  Her heritage is none of your @#$@#$ business.  And you have no right to touch her - or her headphones - without her permission.

Sheesh.

ETA: I should mention I considered talking to her, too, because she had these absolutely amazing iridescent sandals and a really flattering dress on and I wanted to tell her she looked great.  But I didn't, because a) that's a bit weird even from another woman, and b) see above about the headphones and the phone and the obviously not wanting to be bothered . . .
« Last Edit: July 23, 2014, 09:52:15 AM by Slartibartfast »

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28100 on: July 23, 2014, 11:11:22 AM »
Quote
Dude: [reaches to tug on her headphone cord]

Oh my goodness, that would send me into a blind fit of rage. 

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28101 on: July 23, 2014, 12:58:49 PM »
Quote
Dude: [reaches to tug on her headphone cord]

Oh my goodness, that would send me into a blind fit of rage.

Yeah, the nicest I would be about that is saying in a loud, defensive voice, "Do. Not. Touch. Me." I do not suffer people invading my personal space, and if I were in her position, I would be scared if he tried to grab my property.


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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28102 on: July 23, 2014, 01:01:53 PM »
The only exception is if I was on fire. I would want someone to tell me.

bloo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28103 on: July 23, 2014, 03:15:01 PM »
The only exception is if I was on fire. I would want someone to tell me.

POD.

Yeah they could even touch me.

With, like, water.

Or a blanket.

 ::)

songbird

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28104 on: July 23, 2014, 07:48:14 PM »
I know I'm a bit late, but I have to weigh in on the daughter driving the car story.

I am the mother of a young woman who has had several minor accidents. 

I am also licensed to practice law in NY.


And my daughter was sued as a result of one of those minor accidents...

-snip

...So honestly, had I been in the car when my teenage daughter had the accident, I probably would not have allowed her to speak to the other driver, and I probably would have handled the exchange of information myself.

That doesn't excuse rudeness, of course.  I would have been polite about it.

I don't want to get into legalities, but it is pretty bad as a motorist to drive a vehicle with a safety hazard.

Yeah, I don't think it would have been good to protect someone from the consequences of neglect or poor decisions - in this case driving a vehicle that one knows is unsafe. In your DD's inexperience she owned up to her own culpability and that's not a bad thing. Going forward your DD, no doubt, understands the importance of proper vehicle maintenance. I'm sure she drives more carefully now. I'd be pretty nervous to ride with someone young that had many minor accidents.

I guess we are on different pages, because as a lawyer I would tell you to keep your mouth shut and say nothing to the other driver except "are you ok?" And "Here's my insurance card."  Don't lie or mislead, but let your insurer  handle the matter.  Even a simple "I'm sorry" can turn into an admission of fault.

That "brakes" comment resulted in a lawsuit for a nonexistent injury.  The plaintiff collected $$$ from my insurance company for a soft tissue injury -- something legally hard to disprove.  I'm convinced she decided to sue because of what my daughter said.  Can't prove it, but I've handled a few auto claims and you develop a sense of when someone is ...exaggerating their injury.

So yes, when asked the question under oath, of course she told the truth. But we wouldn't have been at that deposition at all if...

Well, anyhow, she's older now, took defensive driving, and I don't worry about her driving anymore.


songbird

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28105 on: July 23, 2014, 08:01:14 PM »
Or rather, I should say the lawyer for the insurance company felt the jury might not agree with us, and therefore decided to settle rather than take a chance on a jury verdict.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28106 on: July 23, 2014, 08:19:23 PM »
I saw an auto accident in my rear-view mirror today.  I don't think anybody was a special snowflake in the extreme, but a combination of partial special snowflakiness must have added up to one whole snowflake.  Which is an interesting concept--if one person shows a small amount of special snowflake behavior, it might not cause problems.  But if several people do it, it may sometimes have an additive effect.

It was one of those construction zones where everybody has to merge into the right lane.  Car #1 might be the one considered at fault legally?  He was in the left lane and decided, rather than getting right, to zoom down the now-empty left lane to get ahead of everybody else.  His speed compared to everybody else's (everybody else was almost at a standstill, he was probably doing 40) was a contributing factor.

Car #2 was in the stopped traffic in the right lane, and noticed Car #3 in the parking lot to the right wishing to cross the stopped traffic to make a left turn.  So Car #2 left a space in front so that Car #3 could pass in front, cross the (empty) left lane and make a left turn (there was an opening in the median there and it's usually legal to make a left turn at that spot).

Car #3 saw the opening, pulled through in front of Car #2, and started to cross (empty) left lane when suddenly the left lane was no longer empty, because Car #1 was speeding along.  The line of cars from Car #2 back blocked Car #3's view, so Car #3 was attempting to drive blindly into the left lane on the assumption that everybody had gotten over.

Smash!  Cars #1 and #3 looked fairly smooshed.  Car #2 is going to be sitting there for a long time, as there wasn't room to pass the smooshed cars.  Same fate for all cars behind #2.

Car #3 probably also had some fault for attempting to make that left turn when the heavy stopped traffic made it impossible to see clearly all the way across the road.  I'm not sure, but it's possible #2 will also have some fault if they indicated for #3 to cross, but probably not if they didn't, as it's *possible* that the space wasn't a deliberate attempt to leave room for Car #3 but just space between them and the next car (or that they could argue that's all it was).

Lady Snowdon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28107 on: July 23, 2014, 08:41:40 PM »
The area just south of where I work is under a lot of construction - highway construction, side street construction, building construction, you name it!  Right now, one street goes down to one lane at an intersection, and there is a no left turn sign that's been put up, presumably to keep traffic from being at a standstill as people try and turn left.  So far this week, I've seen no less than 8 drivers turn left at that light.  Many of them also turned left as the light was turning red, compounding their poor choice.  I'm left to wonder how many people in this city know what a no left turn sign means, and how many of that set of people believe it could actually apply to them...

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28108 on: July 23, 2014, 08:52:29 PM »
Those of us in Northern climes know that there are really only two seasons:  winter and construction.
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greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #28109 on: July 23, 2014, 08:57:11 PM »
I'm in Florida.  Road construction is the only season!