A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

Special Snowflake Stories

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HermioneGranger:
What it is about movie theaters that brings out the worst of people?   ???  I'm another one who gets there early for a good seat, and I'll be darned if I'm going to move for someone who can't manage their time better. 

Xallanthia:

--- Quote from: Firecat on February 03, 2009, 09:14:43 AM ---
--- Quote from: SisJackson on February 03, 2009, 03:41:01 AM ---The theater employee called down the row and asked if everyone was willing to move down two seats.  My friend piped up again.  "No, we are not going to move, but we will let people go past us if they want to."

Another person in the row spoke up.  "Do we have to move?  Or is it optional?"

"Well, you don't have to," said the usher.

The other patron continued.  "Well, I don't think any of us should have to move.  We all got here really early to make sure we got good seats.  I don't think any of us should be punished because other people can't be bothered to plan."  At that, there was a smattering of applause from nearby people.

There was a hushed conference between the four double-daters and the theater employee, after which all five left the theater.  We learned from the people nearest the end of the row that they'd been offered a refund of their ticket price.

--- End quote ---

I love this! I really, really hate it when the theater employees stand in the theater and start yelling at everyone to "move in." I understand that this means that the showing is likely sold out. And I know that it's annoying to have to get past people. But I don't think that I should have to move out of the seat I got there early to be able to pick out, just for the convenience of those who chose to get there later, and who should have been well aware that the movie in question is very popular (recent examples would be Iron Man and The Dark Knight). DH and I get there early so that we can get seats we want, and so that we can sit together.

It wasn't wrong for them to ask people to move, but it was definitely wrong for them to demand it. And, I think, definitely wrong for them to try to get the theater employee to "force" you to move. I understand why the theater offered the refund (honestly, I wouldn't have wanted to deal with the Special Snowflakes any longer than I had to, either), but I don't think they should have had to. I don't think there's any guarantee that you'll be able to find exactly the seats you want...especially not ten minutes before the showing of a popular movie.

--- End quote ---

See, at an opening weekend showing of a big movie, a sold-out show, I don't mind the ushers asking people to move down, as long as it isn't a big move.  Many times, at movie theaters, people leave a seat between themselves and the next party, which is inconvenient at a sold-out show.  If it's myself and 2 other people, for example, I usually look for the combination 1 seat->group->two seats, and ask the group nicely if they'd mind moving down one seat.  IMO, that's normal, and polite, and moving one seat won't usually change the group's experience significantly.

However, in the situation this poster described the people were certainly being rude.  There were four of them and two sets of two seats... if it was a double date, they could just split up, and deal, rather than move the ENTIRE row.  (I would never ask the entire row to move, either).  Or if it was all just friends, same deal.  Just split up, it isn't a big deal.  It's not as though someone would've had to sit alone.

I do have to say, if it was the same situation but with one seat to either side of the poster and her friend, there weren't other seats available, and I asked nicely if they minded moving down just one seat so DH and I could sit together, I'd probably think they were being rather selfish if they said no.  I try to arrive at a theater soon enough to have my pick of seats, but sometimes it just isn't possible.

2littlemonkeys:
This was years ago and I honestly can't remember how it was handled, if it even was.

I was at a local grocery store and at that time, you could buy stamps at the customer service desk (now they sell them right at the register).  That particular day, I was on my lunch break and there was a bit of a line for stamps and other customer service issues.  Our Special Snowflake breezed to the front of the line and cut in front of the person who was next.  When the people in line protested, she turned around and informed us all that SHE was on her lunch break and needed to go first.

OOOOHHHHH.  Well in that case... ::)

Then there was day we caught a neighbor lifting her dog OVER our fence (it was short, probably less than 3 feet tall) so he could do his business in our yard.  When my DH told her to take a hike, she became very indignant and informed him that Mr. Fluffykins did NOT like to poop on cement and needed grass.  We now have a 6 foot fence.  Not because of the dog but it sure solved that problem.  Who knows how long she had been doing this, we did have the occasional mystery poo in the yard but one of our tenants had a dog and we thought it was him (and blaming him for something he probably didn't even do.   :-\)  

Firecat:

--- Quote from: Xallanthia on February 03, 2009, 09:46:41 AM ---I do have to say, if it was the same situation but with one seat to either side of the poster and her friend, there weren't other seats available, and I asked nicely if they minded moving down just one seat so DH and I could sit together, I'd probably think they were being rather selfish if they said no.  I try to arrive at a theater soon enough to have my pick of seats, but sometimes it just isn't possible.

--- End quote ---

Normally, I'd agree with you. I don't mind so much being asked - nicely - to move a seat or two over by an individual patron. But for some reason, when it's the usher standing there yelling at the whole theater, I find it annoying. And when I'm settled in my seat, with my coat, purse, popcorn, etc., it is kind of irritating to have to pick up everything and shift over. But maybe it has more to do with the yelling than with the request itself.

In the situation in the OP, though, with the gap in front of them, I don't think the OP would be selfish to refuse to move one seat over. If it wouldn't change the experience significantly, sure. But, in this particular situation, it would have changed the OP's experience. As a...er..."vertically challenged" person myself, I can appreciate how great it was for the OP to find seats where no one would be blocking the view of the screen. So it was arguably a somewhat unique situation.

TylerBelle:

--- Quote from: missmolly on February 03, 2009, 01:11:18 AM ---Madame Special Snowflake says to my mother: 'I have a child'
Mum, bless her, points to me and says: 'Me too! Aren't they great'.
--- End quote ---
Hee! Perfect!


This came to mind, I don't know if it's conveys pure Snowflake behavior, but I think it could be a relative. I'd stopped to by the supermarket's customer service to get stamps (if I remember correctly) one day and there was a lady in a wheelchair (WL) being assisted/pushed by a store employee (SE) right in front of me. After WL was through, the SE deposited her to the side for someone was going to come get her. I didn't move up immediately in order to give room for the SE to get WL settled and move away herself. Though perhaps I'd waited a bit too long for right as I stepped to the counter, WL had grabbed its edge and promptly pulled herself back in front of the line, I had to jump back to get out of her way. Her business was finished, she just sat there, sideways, like an obstacle between the line and the desk. She turned to glare at me, which at my height we were nearly eye level. I had to conduct my business - buying my stamps over her. I got out of there as quick as I could, though I guess until she was fetched, I supposed everyone else in line had to work around her, too.

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