Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5512528 times)

6 Members and 9 Guests are viewing this topic.

Midge

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 147
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12510 on: November 25, 2011, 11:41:48 AM »

The thing that seem especially snowflakey was when after the movie I came out of the restroom only to find the mother blocking half of the only entrance/exit to the restroom creating a bottleneck just so she could take a picture of her girl against the tile in the entrance way and had to get the picture just so.

That's one for the scrapbook! "Here's Lydia in the bathroom at the movie theater!"  ::)

artk2002

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12982
    • The Delian's Commonwealth
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12511 on: November 25, 2011, 12:13:49 PM »
Coworker told me this story and I honestly couldn't believe people could be so nosy !!!

CW took her DD and DD's friend out to dinner. They both ordered the virgin version of an alcoholic drink. Once they were served them, an older couple at the next table kept giving dirty looks. After a few moments, they pulled a waitress aside and demanded to know just what they were drinking and that they didn't look old enough. The waitress just tells them that it's a non-alcoholic beverage and then just walks away.

The couple pulled the waitress aside 1 or 2 more times and kept shooting dirty looks, so CW finally says "She[waitress] said NON-ALCOHOLIC."

I mean, pulling the waitress aside once and acting concerned, fine. But they pulled her over after giving dirty looks, and then pulled her over again and wouldn't stop glaring, which made them SSy.  Really. Are you so bored that you need to concern yourself with what's going on at another table ? Especially if the waitress already informs you of what the drinks were, even though she didn't have to ?  ::)

I think pulling the waitress aside the first time was pretty SSy. Unless they knew for sure the girls were underage, it was none of their business.

Unless they work for ABC (or whatever the equivalent is in their state), it's not their business.  Period.  No matter how old or young the kids look.  SS from the get-go.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28613
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12512 on: November 25, 2011, 12:43:34 PM »
The nosy couple concerned about possible underage drinking reminds me of a kurfuffle that happened in my area (Detroit):

A man took his young son to a Tiger baseball game. During the course of the game he gets his son something to drink -- a lemonade, which is what the sign at the concession stand said.

It was not until a stadium employee say the boy with the bottle in his lap that the man found out his son was drinking "Mike's Hard Lemonade" ("Hard" as in containing alcohol -- As I recall the dad was not aware that that was what "Hard" meant -- many people don't.)

The son was taken by ambulance to the hospital and though his blood alcohol level was normal, eventually he was taken to foster care briefly. As I recall, he returned to his family after several days.

IMHO the dad was not a special snowflake but the overzealous child-welfare people that caused a family a great deal of anguish definitely were. Oy!

Oh, dear, Mike and his "lemonade". A constant source of misunderstanding.

My parents had a cottage, which was free to be used by my cousins. They were very respectful and didn't abuse the privileges. In fact, they often stocked the fridge with groceries, which were free for whoever wanted them.

One day my father was over cutting the lawn. It was a hot day, and when finished he came in to get a drink. Since he liked his alcohol, he got a bottle of spirits, and went looking for some mix. Oh, look, Cousin A has left some nice cold lemonade in the fridge! He made himself a double.

Thank goodness he lay down for a nap, and didn't try to drive afterwards.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

nutraxfornerves

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1996
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12513 on: November 25, 2011, 12:48:06 PM »
Quote
Unless they work for ABC (or whatever the equivalent is in their state), it's not their business.  Period.  No matter how old or young the kids look.  SS from the get-go.
Well, I'd say yes and no. If they genuinely feel that kids are drinking and that the booze is a danger to the kids, then they might have a moral obligation to do something. That something might be to call the police if they felt that the situation was out of hand. But sitting and glaring isn't going to protect any child from harm. And ignoring the waitress's assertions that the drinks were not alcoholic just makes you look foolish.

An ER doc told me this story: A couple came in with a comatose boy, about 9 or 10 years old. They'd gone out to dinner and Dad ordered a Long Island Ice Tea (one of those tall drinks that contains a snort of every kind of booze the bar has). Dad insisted that the boy drink it. Not just taste it, but drink it.

The boy said he didn't like the taste and tried to refuse, but Dad insisted that "it's time you learned to drink like a man." Mom apparently was passive throughout all this. The result, of course, was a kid who nearly died from alcohol poisoning.

A doctor is required to notify authorities about possible child abuse and my friend was more than happy to comply. (My friend never heard the outcome).

That's the kind of situation where I think bystanders could help by notifying someone, even if it's just telling the restaurant staff that a little kid is drinking booze.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28613
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12514 on: November 25, 2011, 12:51:31 PM »
nutraxfornerves, I certainly hope that child was taken away to a safe place until the time his father grew some sense (or child reached age of majority, which is likely to happen first).
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Angel B.

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 322
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12515 on: November 25, 2011, 01:13:21 PM »
POD with twik. That poor kid.
My greatest treasure is love beyond measure.
-Il barbiere di Siviglia

TeamBhakta

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2642
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12516 on: November 25, 2011, 01:21:30 PM »
Had a set of parent snowflakes at the movies yesterday.  Went to see Breaking Dawn.  Noticed halfway through the movie that a hispanic couple had brought their two small children, boy looked to be about 6 and the girl 4.  Both children were allowed to climb out of their seats, the boy moved to my row where the dad then sat there and only told him to move back.  Then the little girl ran down their entire aisle as well.  With the entire theatre giving them looks each time we had no more incidents.  There were no ushers in the theatre and going to get one would have cost me 10-15 minutes of the movie as I would have had to walk all the way to the desk since I was in one of the farest theatre they had.

The thing that seem especially snowflakey was when after the movie I came out of the restroom only to find the mother blocking half of the only entrance/exit to the restroom creating a bottleneck just so she could take a picture of her girl against the tile in the entrance way and had to get the picture just so.

Why is the fact that they're Hispanic relevant ? Whether it was your intention or not, pointing out  race in a story generally comes across as "Of course Hispanic people would do that, what can you expect from those people"

*ETA: Was reading an article that explained what to donate and not to donate to food banks (rice, peanut butter, plain cereal, tuna vs ramen, sugar cereal, chips, soda). Some special snowflakes basically complained about "They should take whatever donation I give and like it.  Or maybe I won't donate at all, if they don't like my donations of ramen."  ::)
« Last Edit: November 25, 2011, 01:47:22 PM by TeamBhakta »

Reader

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 642
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12517 on: November 25, 2011, 01:53:28 PM »
I'm sorry that my comment on their race was taken that way I only meant to describe them as non natives (I probably should have said that instead) because it seemed really odd to me to take a picture of a child against tile in the bathroom entrance/exit, granted it is unusal because it is three colors of red, black, and white and a unique design only seen in this line of theatres.  I meant no disrespect.

Ruelz

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1254
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12518 on: November 25, 2011, 01:57:56 PM »
...I only meant to describe them as non natives ...

Just pure curiosity now on my part.  What does non native mean (in this context)?
"The only difference between a rut and a grave is their dimensions." Ellen Glasgow

Reader

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 642
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12519 on: November 25, 2011, 02:04:19 PM »
Non native as not born in the US or not native to the area.

Ruelz

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1254
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12520 on: November 25, 2011, 02:06:16 PM »
Non native as not born in the US or not native to the area.

Thanks!  That clears it up!  ;D
"The only difference between a rut and a grave is their dimensions." Ellen Glasgow

Steve

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 902
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12521 on: November 25, 2011, 02:11:22 PM »


Please don't judge us too harshly from this incident.  I am not sure how long ago this was, but I would say this was probably a massive cultural misunderstanding. 

It was a LONG time ago :). Also, you are right I think. I have spent a year in the US after this. Did not drink a drop of alcohol ofcourse, as it is illegal. I understand the laws involved.

The only thing I could not get my head around is: why would they think it was okay for them to berate my mother like that, at a dining table.  That is the only rude item here I think.



camlan

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8632
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12522 on: November 25, 2011, 04:11:24 PM »
At the Children's Hospital.

My nephew was in the ICU on Thanksgiving, following surgery the day before. I was bringing his younger brother and sister to see him. As you approach the ICU, there are several large signs telling you that you can't use your cell phone, or asking you to turn your cell phone off in the ICU. To me, it doesn't matter *why* the hospital has this rule. The rule is there, it is most likely to help in the care of the children in the unit and you have the choice to follow the rule or leave. There are also several signs pointing out areas where cell phone use is allowed--two waiting rooms right outside the ICU, part of the hall, the rec room down the hall, the hospital lobby, etc. Cell reception in the hospital is pretty bad anyway, so the rule doesn't cause a lot of problems for people anyway.

There was a man who insisted on using his cell phone in the middle of the ICU main hallway. The staff at the desk asked him nicely to stop. A nurse told him to stop. A doctor yelled at him. The security guards ordered him to give up his phone. The police officers handcuffed him and led him away. What phone call could be that important? And more important than the kid he was there to visit?

On the other hand, the nice family next door to my nephew brought in a complete turkey dinner and offered to share with my SIL, who stayed in the room while my brother and the ambulatory kids all went to Uncle Ned's house for Thanksgiving dinner. SIL had two Thanksgiving dinners, because we sent my brother back with a plate of her favorites later in the day.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28613
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12523 on: November 25, 2011, 05:03:11 PM »
I understand that cellphones and other "wireless" devices can affect some of the equipment, leading to difficulties in the readings.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

creativecat

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 102
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #12524 on: November 25, 2011, 06:19:28 PM »
I don't think I shared this one on here before - probably because I didn't handle it well etiquette-wise. :-[ (Back in college, I did not hold my tongue when people offended me or were rude to me, so I know I was partially at fault for escalating this.)

Once, while attempting to find a place to park at the grocery store, I got stuck for about 5-10 minutes, just waiting for the lady in front of me to move her car or park so I could find a spot of my own. There was a car behind me, no room to pull a U turn, and there was no room to go around the woman. She wanted this spot where a man was unloading a cart full of groceries and his wife was strapping in their kids. (They were definitely not in a rush to leave that spot.)

After a while (5 minutes?) I honked and yelled out my window at the lady to move. She got out of her car, walked up to my window and screamed in my face for being impatient. I was already pretty freaked out that she didn't take the clue-by-four when she heard me honk. I told her that she'd parked in the middle, making it impossible to get around her, so she needed to move.

By the time she walked back to her car to move it barely to the side, the people behind me had all backed themselves out, and I was able to back out and find a different lane / spot to park. She was just getting ready to pull in by the time I made it to the door.