Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5081122 times)

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wheeitsme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17985 on: November 13, 2012, 01:07:27 PM »
Mental Mother just told me this yesterday.  She was handing out candy for trick-or-treating this year.  The doorbell rang as per usual and Mental Mother opened the door only to find two adults standing there, not in costume.  As she looked them over, it became apparent to her that there was a baby in a sling across the mother's chest.  Mental Mother asked to see the little one in her costume, except that the 1 month old only had a spot of black on her nose.  Yes, a 1 month old.

And that's why I also have "Baby Mum-Mum"s to hand out.  Individually wrapped, pre-packaged rice husks that babies can actually eat. 

If you are excited about dressing up and dressing up your babe for their first Halloween to show them off, I'm okay with that.  I will probably give you a piece of candy, too.  No costume and just a babe in a sling?  Baby is the only one to get a treat and it's one that baby can actually eat.

Christabeldreams

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17986 on: November 13, 2012, 01:24:26 PM »
-A woman at a comic convention who got upset when a guy bought some sort of superhero figurine that her 12-13 year old son wanted.  And screamed that comic books are for CHILDREN not adults, and what was wrong with this man to go around stealing toys from children?  She was eventually kicked out of the convention.

EvilTraska wants to introduce this woman's children to the Marvel "MAX" imprint.  Or even DC's "Vertigo".
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Edited, because I was silly enough to forget my SS story. A friend of mine works at Party City and despite the fact that it's stated clearly on the receipt, the signs on the cash registers, and told to you by the cashiers, they are still innundated with people DEMANDING to return their halloween stuff THE DAY AFTER HALLOWEEN. They suspect it was a ploy to get free decorations/costumes.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2012, 01:29:39 PM by Christabeldreams »

CakeBeret

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17987 on: November 13, 2012, 02:16:57 PM »
Today's Job Search Special Snowflake, courtesy of Not Always Working

http://notalwaysworking.com/some-coworkers-are-to-be-a-void-ed/27253
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Sirius

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17988 on: November 13, 2012, 03:38:17 PM »
My son was five months old when his first Halloween rolled around. I dressed him up in a monkey costume and took him to see grandparents.

I don't think there's anything wrong with participating in a little of the fun of Halloween as your little ones can. But I do agree door to door trick or treating with one too little does go a bit too far.

A neighbor of my parents' brought over her two older kids and her infant, who was dressed up in a bunny costume.  But that's different - she had two older kids who were trick or treating, and my parents were close neighbors.   

Sirius

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17989 on: November 13, 2012, 03:42:35 PM »
Also - my dad and I are at opposite ends of the political spectrum.  This last election, he started in criticizing my candidate, and I told him that since I knew we would never agree I wasn't going to discuss politics with him.  Strangely enough, he actually dropped the subject and started talking about history.  Maybe he's mellowing in his old age (he's almost 80.)

Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17990 on: November 13, 2012, 03:55:54 PM »
I can't decide if this is SS or brain hurty, so I'm going to drop it here.

My DP, who as many of you know is recovering from a major health issue (5 months in the hospital last year), wanted a grill when we moved to the new place. Not a standard one, mind you - a super fancy, wood pellet burning grill that costs $$$. It's easy to use, environmentally friendly, etc. and since it's got a thermostat and holds its temp, and has a remote to show the temp and such she can operate it with a minimum of standing around waiting for things. It was the one thing she asked for in the move, and I said yes, and we bought the grill. The movers, in their infinite wisdom, managed to hide the grill cover and the bag of wood pellets we'd bought with it, and so it sat, unused, for two months, as we were busy and hadn't had a chance to go anywhere to get more pellets (they aren't something you can just pick up at the store).

Here's the brain hurty/special snowflakey part - we mention that hadn't gotten pellets yet to my parents, who were coming up for a weekend. Mom finds some local to her, and they bring us a big bag of them. We all plan (including DP) for us to have a grilled dinner the second night they were there - steaks, baked potatoes, corn, etc. and mom and dad buy all the stuff. DP gets really sick the morning of the planned dinner - this happens, with some regularity, since her hospital time. Mom and dad, with DP's permission and blessing, get the grill going and make dinner for all of us. DP eats dinner, is gracious, all is well. Until after they leave - when DP says that even though she loves the grill, she wishes she could replace it with another identical one and give the one we have to mom and dad, because it 'no longer feels like hers' since my parents were the first to use it.

I'm baffled by the whole thing.

I can see feeling this way - when you are sick you tend to attach an undue amount of importance to mundane or everyday things. I can only imagine that that would be magnified 1000x when you are sick for an extended period of time. DP has probably been looking forward tremendously to cooking on 'her' grill for a long time and then her illness got in the way at the last moment. That's got to be disappointing. However, I know that personally I would feel silly for feeling that way and would certainly be gracious while guests were there, but may let my disappointment and 'silly' feelings out to DH once they left because he is my 'safe' person and gets to see allllllll my crazy  :)

Now, if you said she was actually insisting on buying a new grill...
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RebeccainGA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17991 on: November 13, 2012, 04:19:19 PM »
I can't decide if this is SS or brain hurty, so I'm going to drop it here.

My DP, who as many of you know is recovering from a major health issue (5 months in the hospital last year), wanted a grill when we moved to the new place. Not a standard one, mind you - a super fancy, wood pellet burning grill that costs $$$. It's easy to use, environmentally friendly, etc. and since it's got a thermostat and holds its temp, and has a remote to show the temp and such she can operate it with a minimum of standing around waiting for things. It was the one thing she asked for in the move, and I said yes, and we bought the grill. The movers, in their infinite wisdom, managed to hide the grill cover and the bag of wood pellets we'd bought with it, and so it sat, unused, for two months, as we were busy and hadn't had a chance to go anywhere to get more pellets (they aren't something you can just pick up at the store).

Here's the brain hurty/special snowflakey part - we mention that hadn't gotten pellets yet to my parents, who were coming up for a weekend. Mom finds some local to her, and they bring us a big bag of them. We all plan (including DP) for us to have a grilled dinner the second night they were there - steaks, baked potatoes, corn, etc. and mom and dad buy all the stuff. DP gets really sick the morning of the planned dinner - this happens, with some regularity, since her hospital time. Mom and dad, with DP's permission and blessing, get the grill going and make dinner for all of us. DP eats dinner, is gracious, all is well. Until after they leave - when DP says that even though she loves the grill, she wishes she could replace it with another identical one and give the one we have to mom and dad, because it 'no longer feels like hers' since my parents were the first to use it.

I'm baffled by the whole thing.

I can see feeling this way - when you are sick you tend to attach an undue amount of importance to mundane or everyday things. I can only imagine that that would be magnified 1000x when you are sick for an extended period of time. DP has probably been looking forward tremendously to cooking on 'her' grill for a long time and then her illness got in the way at the last moment. That's got to be disappointing. However, I know that personally I would feel silly for feeling that way and would certainly be gracious while guests were there, but may let my disappointment and 'silly' feelings out to DH once they left because he is my 'safe' person and gets to see allllllll my crazy  :)

Now, if you said she was actually insisting on buying a new grill...

I'm hoping that once she uses it a time or two she'll feel a little better. Sadly, she hasn't had a chance to yet, between weather and other logistics. Hoping maybe soon, though! Glad to hear it's not totally out of the realm of 'normal' though... I was a bit worried. LOL

Yarnspinner

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17992 on: November 13, 2012, 05:11:10 PM »
Don't know if this belongs here or the Harry Potter thread.

A little background:  thanks to layoffs and the almost constant exodus of staff who won't put up longer with Stonecold's policies, we are down by more than half the staff we used to have to run one big main library and several satellites.  Most days, some of us are on desk alone for an hour or there will be two of us for longer periods of time.  For most of the time we are on desk, we cannot do any kind of paper work or online work because we are constantly getting up to help with questions of the "How do I upload my photos from my IPhone to Facebook?" variety and the every popular "I made an email address for myself six years ago, but I can't remember what it was.  Can you find it for me?"  (Nope).  We are running to get books for people, trying to help people make sense of bills or subpoenas  (yes, we have been asked to explain those, I bet Peter M. has similar tales) and so on and so forth.  So we really cannot sit down and not move for two or three hours at a time to, you know, keep someone honest if they are, say, taking a test.

Enter special snowflake who can't seem to get that WE CAN'T DO THIS. 

He called this morning asking us to proctor an exam.  I have done this before, waaaaaaay back when we had actual staff and time.  It involved me getting several exams mailed to me, me signing several forms and then locking the person in a glassed in room where I could keep an eye on him AND get some work done.  I also had to time him.

My coworker got the original call and the above has always been her proctoring experience, too.  She explained for twenty minutes why we don't do this, including the all important "monitoring" part of the proctoring. 

Well, the patron decided to do some research and came in to tell us that other area libraries said THEY would proctor the test, but they wouldn't monitor him, he was on his own as to the time and they would not sign anything that said they had watched him, but he was certainly welcome to come in and take his test on the honor system.

He shows up with this information and says "You should consider this. I need some help here!"  One of my immediate supervisors pointed out that "What Other Library does isn't called proctoring, it's called you coming in and doing it all on your own.  We can't be responsible for tellling your professor that you followed all the rules when we can't be available to monitor you." 

He continued to argue that the other libraries are willing to proctor him and we should do the same.  We told him again that the other libraries are telling him he can come in and take the exam if he wants, but they aren't going to give h im any assistance or support.  We told him the same "You are welcome to come in here and take the exam, but we are not going to be able to monitor you and since we cannot monitor you we cannot sign the necessary forms saying you followed the rules."

Nothing was resolved when he left except that he had agreed to talk to his professor and see what "proctoring" meant to the professor. 


Nikko-chan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17993 on: November 13, 2012, 07:35:38 PM »

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17994 on: November 13, 2012, 07:55:19 PM »
From Customers Suck. Major language warning--it's laden with F-bombs. The brightest, uniquest, specialest snowflake EVAR!!!

It's a holiday and the banks are closed. SS manages to phone the Corporate Security office of a very large bank with over 600 branches. Security has nothing to do with customers.

1. SS is furious because the security person on duty doesn't immediately recognize his name, since SS is one of the most important customers of the bank.
2. SS demands that Security send someone to the SS's bank branch and open it up so the SS can make a deposit that absolutely must be made that day. Will not take "no" for an answer. "I am a very important customer of this bank! Is this how you treat all your VIPs?"

I saw this!  Wow. truly a special snowflake
I"m wondering how overdrawn he was to throw a fit like that. I figure he wrote a check, the deposit to cover it didn't make it in on time that is why he tried the strong arm tactic.
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doodlemor

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17995 on: November 13, 2012, 07:57:30 PM »
Don't know if this belongs here or the Harry Potter thread.

A little background:  thanks to layoffs and the almost constant exodus of staff who won't put up longer with Stonecold's policies, we are down by more than half the staff we used to have to run one big main library and several satellites.  Most days, some of us are on desk alone for an hour or there will be two of us for longer periods of time.  For most of the time we are on desk, we cannot do any kind of paper work or online work because we are constantly getting up to help with questions of the "How do I upload my photos from my IPhone to Facebook?" variety and the every popular "I made an email address for myself six years ago, but I can't remember what it was.  Can you find it for me?"  (Nope).  We are running to get books for people, trying to help people make sense of bills or subpoenas  (yes, we have been asked to explain those, I bet Peter M. has similar tales) and so on and so forth.  So we really cannot sit down and not move for two or three hours at a time to, you know, keep someone honest if they are, say, taking a test.

Enter special snowflake who can't seem to get that WE CAN'T DO THIS. 

He called this morning asking us to proctor an exam.  I have done this before, waaaaaaay back when we had actual staff and time.  It involved me getting several exams mailed to me, me signing several forms and then locking the person in a glassed in room where I could keep an eye on him AND get some work done.  I also had to time him.

My coworker got the original call and the above has always been her proctoring experience, too.  She explained for twenty minutes why we don't do this, including the all important "monitoring" part of the proctoring. 

Well, the patron decided to do some research and came in to tell us that other area libraries said THEY would proctor the test, but they wouldn't monitor him, he was on his own as to the time and they would not sign anything that said they had watched him, but he was certainly welcome to come in and take his test on the honor system.

He shows up with this information and says "You should consider this. I need some help here!"  One of my immediate supervisors pointed out that "What Other Library does isn't called proctoring, it's called you coming in and doing it all on your own.  We can't be responsible for tellling your professor that you followed all the rules when we can't be available to monitor you." 

He continued to argue that the other libraries are willing to proctor him and we should do the same.  We told him again that the other libraries are telling him he can come in and take the exam if he wants, but they aren't going to give h im any assistance or support.  We told him the same "You are welcome to come in here and take the exam, but we are not going to be able to monitor you and since we cannot monitor you we cannot sign the necessary forms saying you followed the rules."

Nothing was resolved when he left except that he had agreed to talk to his professor and see what "proctoring" meant to the professor.

What a super SS!  Apparently he's too important to proctor the thing himself. 

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17996 on: November 13, 2012, 08:15:01 PM »
Don't know if this belongs here or the Harry Potter thread.

A little background:  thanks to layoffs and the almost constant exodus of staff who won't put up longer with Stonecold's policies, we are down by more than half the staff we used to have to run one big main library and several satellites.  Most days, some of us are on desk alone for an hour or there will be two of us for longer periods of time.  For most of the time we are on desk, we cannot do any kind of paper work or online work because we are constantly getting up to help with questions of the "How do I upload my photos from my IPhone to Facebook?" variety and the every popular "I made an email address for myself six years ago, but I can't remember what it was.  Can you find it for me?"  (Nope).  We are running to get books for people, trying to help people make sense of bills or subpoenas  (yes, we have been asked to explain those, I bet Peter M. has similar tales) and so on and so forth.  So we really cannot sit down and not move for two or three hours at a time to, you know, keep someone honest if they are, say, taking a test.

Enter special snowflake who can't seem to get that WE CAN'T DO THIS. 

He called this morning asking us to proctor an exam.  I have done this before, waaaaaaay back when we had actual staff and time.  It involved me getting several exams mailed to me, me signing several forms and then locking the person in a glassed in room where I could keep an eye on him AND get some work done.  I also had to time him.

My coworker got the original call and the above has always been her proctoring experience, too.  She explained for twenty minutes why we don't do this, including the all important "monitoring" part of the proctoring. 

Well, the patron decided to do some research and came in to tell us that other area libraries said THEY would proctor the test, but they wouldn't monitor him, he was on his own as to the time and they would not sign anything that said they had watched him, but he was certainly welcome to come in and take his test on the honor system.

He shows up with this information and says "You should consider this. I need some help here!"  One of my immediate supervisors pointed out that "What Other Library does isn't called proctoring, it's called you coming in and doing it all on your own.  We can't be responsible for tellling your professor that you followed all the rules when we can't be available to monitor you." 

He continued to argue that the other libraries are willing to proctor him and we should do the same.  We told him again that the other libraries are telling him he can come in and take the exam if he wants, but they aren't going to give h im any assistance or support.  We told him the same "You are welcome to come in here and take the exam, but we are not going to be able to monitor you and since we cannot monitor you we cannot sign the necessary forms saying you followed the rules."

Nothing was resolved when he left except that he had agreed to talk to his professor and see what "proctoring" meant to the professor.

What a super SS!  Apparently he's too important to proctor the thing himself.
I think the SS is the one who needs a proctor because he's taking an exam which requires one.
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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17997 on: November 13, 2012, 08:27:38 PM »
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1286744--fallen-acorns-a-threat-to-kids-with-allergies-vaughan-mother-claims


This woman is quite special snowflakey, in my opinion.
She is also uninformed, and is probably the person causing the anxiety in the kids. According the experts quoted kids can't have a full on reaction to acorns unless they eat them.


I'm saying this as someone with a the most deadly peanut allergy - Nut bans are well intentioned but wrong headed. Kids with nut allergies are going to have learn to live in a peanut/tree nut filled world. They need to start learning young and in a safe place with adults watching to help protect them.


School kitchens should be peanut/nut free (I didn't buy hot lunch all the way through elementary because you had to have a cookie on you tray. They were peanut or chocolate chip served by the same person alternating one then the other)


Individual classrooms should be peanut/nut free


Students who are allergic should be able to move away from someone eating something with peanuts/nuts


Classmates should know to wash their hands after eating something with peanuts/nuts


Any attempt to threaten someone with peanuts/nuts or actually expose them to peanuts/nuts should be treated as a criminal act.


I worry that some kid with peanut allergy is going to switch jackets/hoodies with a friend, and have a reaction to the detergent used to wash the jacket/hoody and no-one is going to believe him/her when s/he tell them s/he has been exposed because the campus is "peanut/nut free". (I've had mild to serious reactions under similar conditions)
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Rohanna

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17998 on: November 13, 2012, 10:59:08 PM »
Don't get me started on the schools that ban *labeled* nut substitues.
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #17999 on: November 13, 2012, 11:16:04 PM »
A friend of mine ("Sherri") works part-time with a campus ministry at a local university - she just finished grad school last year, but she's been a student mentor and the soundboard person for evening worship and the website IT person and a bunch of other little things which probably add up to a lot more hours than she's paid for.  The pastor of the nearest [her denomination] church is the leader of the campus ministry group, then there's an associate pastor who helps out and Sherri who does the majority of the day-to-day work.

The associate pastor "Bob" got married this summer.  Sherri also makes wedding cakes and is trying to start her own bakery, so Bob and his fiancee asked if she would make their wedding cake for them.  He offered $500, with the understanding that the wedding reception would encompass X people (I don't remember the exact number, but I think it was around two hundred).  Most bakers would charge three times that, but Sherri agreed and told Bob the remainder of what she otherwise would have charged would be her wedding present to them.  $500 pretty much covered her materials, but that's a LOT of baking!

A month or two before the wedding, Bob came back to her.  See, there were some extra people they had forgotten to invite, so the reception would be closer to 1.5X people.  And since it would be so much bigger, they weren't having it at the local church, they were having it in his fiancee's hometown - three hours away!  Oh, and his fiancee thought $500 was way too much to pay for a cake because hey, sheet cakes are like ten bucks each at Wal-Mart, so they wanted her to do sheet cakes instead of the fancy ones she had planned and they'd pay $250 instead.

Sherri explained that a) $500 was already assuming $1K worth of wedding present, b) she wasn't going to be driving an extra six hours to deliver these cakes to their new reception, c) she'd have to rent a van and get special equipment to transport sheet cakes instead of the specialized kind she does which are much easier to transport, and d) she was already going to be baking for a solid week to get cake for X people; 1.5X just wasn't going to happen.

As you can probably predict from a special snowflake like this, Bob threw a big fit because Sherri "canceled on him at the last minute" and they had to go get store-bought cakes for the reception instead.  (Which they did buy in his fiancee's hometown, so at least nobody had to drive a van full of cake there!)  Sherri mysteriously never got an invitation to the wedding or the reception.

This actually crosses over into professional darwinism, because the head minister had already noticed some disturbing tendencies in Bob - such as his propensity to take the church's expensive sound equipment home with him for his own personal use whenever it wasn't being used at church (that he knew about).  Sherri did a surprise inventory this month and discovered that of the four Very Expensive Electrical Doohickeys they owned, two were missing (one eventually turned up in Bob's car) and two were broken.  Sherri thinks Bob was borrowing them and just swapped them out when he broke them (which is apparently pretty easy to do if you don't know what you're doing).  It's up to the church board what to do now, but I really doubt Bob will come out of this looking good.