Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 4385225 times)

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humbleonion

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18210 on: November 29, 2012, 09:15:48 PM »
Today the circulations supervisor (we'll call him Pascal) at my library told me a fabulous story that belongs on this thread. I present: The Story of the Special Snowflake Student and How He Got His Comeuppance.

So my library (one of the libraries of a large university) has textbooks for many of the classes offered by the university, but has only a few copies of each, usually between 2 and 4. Students are allowed to check them out for a maximum of 48 hours (in some of the libraries it's only 3 hours). So they're in great demand and students often come in looking for copies when they're all checked out. Naturally, this leads to some Very Special students hiding the textbooks or checking them out and simply refusing to return them, $30/day fines be damned.

The student in question had checked out a textbook and had not returned it, days past the due date. Other students in the class were constantly coming in for the book, and were mightily frustrated to be told that it was still unavailable. Finally, Pascal looked the kid's information up in the library records and called him to tell him that the book was way overdue, and he needed to return it so other students could use it. His response (according to Pascal, this is a direct quote) was, "I don't give a [expletive redacted] about the other students, I need the book!" So Pascal, knowing that showing up at the kid's place of residence and retrieving the book at gunpoint was against library policy, did the next best thing he could think of: he called up the kid's professor and told him what was up.

At the next class, the professor apparently began the class by asking the lecture hall, "Is [Very Special Student] here? Would you stand up, please?" VSS did so, and the professor proceeded to inform the class that VSS was the reason none of them could access the library's copy of the textbook, since he "did not give a [expletive redacted]" about the other students.

While a spontaneous, Life of Brian-style stoning with notebooks, binders and calculators did not, I regret to say, ensue, the Very Special Student apparently left the lecture hall, and returned the book several days later. And he had a fine of upwards of $350. Ah, karma.

The student was indeed a Snowflake, but that's a pretty serious privacy violation on Pascal's part. In my state, it's actually illegal to disclose information about who's checked out what book. At a minimum, it's extremely unethical. As a librarian, I take that sort of thing very seriously. This would be a fire-able offense anywhere I've worked.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18211 on: November 29, 2012, 09:23:03 PM »
Today the circulations supervisor (we'll call him Pascal) at my library told me a fabulous story that belongs on this thread. I present: The Story of the Special Snowflake Student and How He Got His Comeuppance.

So my library (one of the libraries of a large university) has textbooks for many of the classes offered by the university, but has only a few copies of each, usually between 2 and 4. Students are allowed to check them out for a maximum of 48 hours (in some of the libraries it's only 3 hours). So they're in great demand and students often come in looking for copies when they're all checked out. Naturally, this leads to some Very Special students hiding the textbooks or checking them out and simply refusing to return them, $30/day fines be damned.

The student in question had checked out a textbook and had not returned it, days past the due date. Other students in the class were constantly coming in for the book, and were mightily frustrated to be told that it was still unavailable. Finally, Pascal looked the kid's information up in the library records and called him to tell him that the book was way overdue, and he needed to return it so other students could use it. His response (according to Pascal, this is a direct quote) was, "I don't give a [expletive redacted] about the other students, I need the book!" So Pascal, knowing that showing up at the kid's place of residence and retrieving the book at gunpoint was against library policy, did the next best thing he could think of: he called up the kid's professor and told him what was up.

At the next class, the professor apparently began the class by asking the lecture hall, "Is [Very Special Student] here? Would you stand up, please?" VSS did so, and the professor proceeded to inform the class that VSS was the reason none of them could access the library's copy of the textbook, since he "did not give a [expletive redacted]" about the other students.

While a spontaneous, Life of Brian-style stoning with notebooks, binders and calculators did not, I regret to say, ensue, the Very Special Student apparently left the lecture hall, and returned the book several days later. And he had a fine of upwards of $350. Ah, karma.

The student was indeed a Snowflake, but that's a pretty serious privacy violation on Pascal's part. In my state, it's actually illegal to disclose information about who's checked out what book. At a minimum, it's extremely unethical. As a librarian, I take that sort of thing very seriously. This would be a fire-able offense anywhere I've worked.

I was curious about that myself, so I called a friend who's a college librarian.  She told me she's allowed to inform a professor that a textbook is checked out and past due, or that the book is not in the library for whatever reason, but she is not allowed to give them personal information such as the name of the person who checked it out or anything beyond the fact that the book is not there.

eltf177

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18212 on: November 30, 2012, 06:07:46 AM »

I was curious about that myself, so I called a friend who's a college librarian.  She told me she's allowed to inform a professor that a textbook is checked out and past due, or that the book is not in the library for whatever reason, but she is not allowed to give them personal information such as the name of the person who checked it out or anything beyond the fact that the book is not there.

I would agree with this, but it sounds like this was the _sole_ copy of the book and SS was keeping it from many classmates. Not to mention their total contempt for their fellow students. In this case I would give the Librarian a "naughty, naughty; don't do it again" lecture with a wink!

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18213 on: November 30, 2012, 06:46:54 AM »
Red seems to be a bad colour for cars.  Even though it would be more noticeable, red cars seem to have more collisions.  Maybe because people are looking at it and steer towards it unconsciously?  Red cars are often more noticeable to police, too, when identifying a car to pull over.  A buddy of my brother's drove an old beater.  He bought a new, red, sporty number.  Didn't change how he drove but he suddenly started getting all these tickets.

And there was a study done in the UK that showed red cars get nailed by birds more often than other colours, too.

Sure, this all mostly anecdotal but it has convinced me that I won't be buying a red car any time soon.

Not true.  I have had two red cars (I love red cars), and those are the cars I had the fewest collisions/tickets in.
The insurance isn't any higher, either.  (An oddly common misconception)

Queen of Clubs

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18214 on: November 30, 2012, 07:13:13 AM »
Could the car colour discussion be given its own thread?

SS - my (thankfully ex) neighbour.  Among her other exploits, she gave out my phone number to some guy she knew as she hadn't had her phone connected yet and this was before mobile phones were so common.  The first I knew about it was when he rang up and gave me a message for her.  When I told her "don't do that again", she tried to say it was just for emergencies.  That message hadn't been an emergency and I wasn't running a message service for her.

Another time, she rang me at 7 in the morning because she'd come out in spots and thought it was chickenpox.  No, I'm not a doctor, nurse, EMT, or any other medical professional, so what she wanted me to do was a mystery.  In any case, it turned out to be a reaction to the illegal drugs she'd taken the night before.  ::)

ETA: When housesitting for a mutual friend, she invited her one night stand back to the house and used friend's bed for the activities.  She was never asked to housesit again.

athersgeo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18215 on: November 30, 2012, 07:19:16 AM »
Red seems to be a bad colour for cars.  Even though it would be more noticeable, red cars seem to have more collisions.  Maybe because people are looking at it and steer towards it unconsciously?  Red cars are often more noticeable to police, too, when identifying a car to pull over.  A buddy of my brother's drove an old beater.  He bought a new, red, sporty number.  Didn't change how he drove but he suddenly started getting all these tickets.

And there was a study done in the UK that showed red cars get nailed by birds more often than other colours, too.

Sure, this all mostly anecdotal but it has convinced me that I won't be buying a red car any time soon.

Not true.  I have had two red cars (I love red cars), and those are the cars I had the fewest collisions/tickets in.
The insurance isn't any higher, either.  (An oddly common misconception)

I think what all this talk of coloured cars goes to prove is that at least half the driving population don't actually pay proper attention to where they're going and it doesn't matter WHAT colour of car you drive.

(For the record, I've owned or driven cars in white, powder blue, grey and red and while I've probably had more close shaves in the red one [and it's also the only one that's actually been involved in a collision*] that's only because I've owned it longer - eight years vs three years (white) vs eighteen months (powder blue))



* It was a collision caused by a special snowflake driver two cars ahead of me in morning rush hour who randomly decided to stop to let someone out of a turning. I managed (albeit just) not to hit the guy in front of me; poor bloke behind me had no chance of not hitting me. Fortunately, it was all fairly low speed so there was no serious damage done.

Shea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18216 on: November 30, 2012, 08:40:55 AM »
Today the circulations supervisor (we'll call him Pascal) at my library told me a fabulous story that belongs on this thread. I present: The Story of the Special Snowflake Student and How He Got His Comeuppance.

So my library (one of the libraries of a large university) has textbooks for many of the classes offered by the university, but has only a few copies of each, usually between 2 and 4. Students are allowed to check them out for a maximum of 48 hours (in some of the libraries it's only 3 hours). So they're in great demand and students often come in looking for copies when they're all checked out. Naturally, this leads to some Very Special students hiding the textbooks or checking them out and simply refusing to return them, $30/day fines be damned.

The student in question had checked out a textbook and had not returned it, days past the due date. Other students in the class were constantly coming in for the book, and were mightily frustrated to be told that it was still unavailable. Finally, Pascal looked the kid's information up in the library records and called him to tell him that the book was way overdue, and he needed to return it so other students could use it. His response (according to Pascal, this is a direct quote) was, "I don't give a [expletive redacted] about the other students, I need the book!" So Pascal, knowing that showing up at the kid's place of residence and retrieving the book at gunpoint was against library policy, did the next best thing he could think of: he called up the kid's professor and told him what was up.

At the next class, the professor apparently began the class by asking the lecture hall, "Is [Very Special Student] here? Would you stand up, please?" VSS did so, and the professor proceeded to inform the class that VSS was the reason none of them could access the library's copy of the textbook, since he "did not give a [expletive redacted]" about the other students.

While a spontaneous, Life of Brian-style stoning with notebooks, binders and calculators did not, I regret to say, ensue, the Very Special Student apparently left the lecture hall, and returned the book several days later. And he had a fine of upwards of $350. Ah, karma.

The student was indeed a Snowflake, but that's a pretty serious privacy violation on Pascal's part. In my state, it's actually illegal to disclose information about who's checked out what book. At a minimum, it's extremely unethical. As a librarian, I take that sort of thing very seriously. This would be a fire-able offense anywhere I've worked.

I was curious about that myself, so I called a friend who's a college librarian.  She told me she's allowed to inform a professor that a textbook is checked out and past due, or that the book is not in the library for whatever reason, but she is not allowed to give them personal information such as the name of the person who checked it out or anything beyond the fact that the book is not there.

Pascal was in compliance with university policy. If an item is far past due, library staff are allowed to retrieve the name of the student who has the item and contact them to request that they return it. If they refuse to do so, library staff are permitted to pass on the name of the student to a professor or a disciplinary body (i.e, students can be called in for a disciplinary hearing for refusal to return library materials). Apparently Pascal figured the professor would call the Very Special Student into his office and threaten him with a lowered grade or some such if he didn't give the book back, as professors have done in the past. Professor apparently decided on a different strategy.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 09:00:11 AM by Shea »


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littlebird

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18217 on: November 30, 2012, 11:17:37 AM »
I think what all this talk of coloured cars goes to prove is that at least half the driving population don't actually pay proper attention to where they're going and it doesn't matter WHAT colour of car you drive.

Driving or walking! People who blindly step out into crosswalks as though they offer some sort of magical protection, even against cars already halfway through the intersection.

I had that happen recently - on my way to work there is a T intersection with a crosswalk from the flat part of the t (sort of where the fourth leg would be in a normal intersection) coming out of a wooded city park, and the woods end only at the sidewalk so it's very hard to see pedestrians coming. A guy wearing headphones and pushing a jogging stroller came out of the woods and headed right through the crosswalk without stopping. I'd finished my full stop and was starting to head across the intersection towards the crosswalk so I ended up stopped in the middle of the intersection while he crossed. Got my adrenaline pumping, that's for sure, but I don't think he even noticed.

War_Doc

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18218 on: November 30, 2012, 03:01:22 PM »
It has already been mentioned once.  Take the car color talk and accidents to its own thread please.
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littlebird

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18219 on: November 30, 2012, 03:53:27 PM »
Sorry - I thought of the pedestrian as a special snowflake, with the crosswalk as his winter wonderland of magical protection powers.

greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18220 on: November 30, 2012, 06:11:26 PM »
I ride the bus to and from work, and this particular bus runs a looooong way down one of the major traffic arteries.  After it passes the cross street (another major traffic artery) that separates the "east" side of town from the central area, it runs express from there to the main bus terminal downtown, only making one stop in between (at a substation).  This is clearly indicated on the brochure that gives the bus route and schedule.  TWO other buses cover the area in between the central terminal and the cross street, and they run every fifteen minutes vs the every-half-hour schedule for my bus.

Nearly every afternoon on my way back, someone pulls the stop request cord in the "express" portion of the bus's run, and they almost always have a hissy fit while the bus driver and all the other passengers explain to the ignorant rider that this bus only makes one stop between downtown and the cross street.

I just can't figure out how someone could figure out that the bus goes down that way while missing all the things that indicate that it doesn't actually make stops in that area...they are very special snowflakes.

snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18221 on: December 01, 2012, 01:58:51 AM »
It snowed here today, so of course all the SS's were around. My sister and I went to a local market that had plenty of spaces available - including some directly across from the doors.  So what did the SS's do? Parked in the fire lane where it had signs and lettering painted on the ground saying NO PARKING. They parked right over the lettering - which because the car had been in that spot for so long - had no snow on  the letters.  It did not end there.
   I went in and these folks were walking three abreast and refused to move to allow others to pass by...at one point one of the two ladies in the party swung her cart across the aisle so quickly and aggressively she almost hit me, and told me to "watch out, you don't own the store!" We finally got passed them and went to a second aisle to look for what we wanted, only to find them at the exit to that aisle when we were done, again refusing to move to let us pass and telling US how rude WE were.  At this point we thought better of being in this store and left... shaking our heads and wondering what they were thinking.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18222 on: December 01, 2012, 04:45:31 AM »
Pascal was in compliance with university policy. If an item is far past due, library staff are allowed to retrieve the name of the student who has the item and contact them to request that they return it. If they refuse to do so, library staff are permitted to pass on the name of the student to a professor or a disciplinary body (i.e, students can be called in for a disciplinary hearing for refusal to return library materials). Apparently Pascal figured the professor would call the Very Special Student into his office and threaten him with a lowered grade or some such if he didn't give the book back, as professors have done in the past. Professor apparently decided on a different strategy.

This might be called an instance of Pascal's wager...

Shea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18223 on: December 01, 2012, 10:00:26 AM »
Pascal was in compliance with university policy. If an item is far past due, library staff are allowed to retrieve the name of the student who has the item and contact them to request that they return it. If they refuse to do so, library staff are permitted to pass on the name of the student to a professor or a disciplinary body (i.e, students can be called in for a disciplinary hearing for refusal to return library materials). Apparently Pascal figured the professor would call the Very Special Student into his office and threaten him with a lowered grade or some such if he didn't give the book back, as professors have done in the past. Professor apparently decided on a different strategy.

This might be called an instance of Pascal's wager...

::rimshot::


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CakeEater

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18224 on: December 01, 2012, 05:10:41 PM »
I was doing a revision lesson with some students recently and had some Christmas stickers as prizes in the game of revision pictionary we were playing. The game was still in progress, so still chances to win stickers, when SS student (9 years old) approached my teaching helper with "Where's my sticker?" Helper was a bit confused, thinking student had won a sticker and hadn't got one, but no. Student just thought she deserved one because "if someone gets one, everyone should get one."

She tried it on me later in the lesson, and then refused to do any other work and sulked because I didn't give her one. I had actually planned to give another sticker to everyone as I left, but not in that class!