Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5523816 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18735 on: January 06, 2013, 03:14:31 PM »
I believe this is a case of a true picky eater and not a super taster.

A coworker had gone on a university trip abroad with a small group.  One girl in the group refused to eat anywhere that was not an American chain restaurant.  The small group didn't want to split up, so the entire time they were there, they ate at McDonald's, Pizza Hut, Burger King, etc. instead of eating any local food.

(I would not have been so nice.  Trying new things is part of the experience for me.)


I had the same problem in HS on trip to Greece and another to Scotland/England. Except it wasn't the kids - it was the chaperons. It was less of a problem in Greece - because there weren't as many US chains especially on the Islands. But the flipped out at a Greek food and dancing dinner we went to, because we were handed shot glasses of ouzo as we walked in. Everyone except a few of the seniors was under 18, which was the legal drinking age I think. Thing is I'm pretty sure that our unethical tour director* had lied to the venue and said we were a University group not a HS group. I don't think we would have been allowed in if they known we were all underaged. 


In England I flat out refused to walk into a McDonalds - which shocked everyone. I told them I didn't eat there in the US why would I travel across the Atlantic Ocean to eat it. I pointed out several places near by with similar prices but better food. Besides if they were going to keep dragging me to Laura Ashley shops instead of going to museums or historical sites, they could at least let me eat a decent meal. The Principal was in charge of our group - and shocked everyone by letting us to to a pub for lunch. We got to eat local restaurants the rest of the trip for lunch. (We had to stay with our grade-level group, instead of having different interest based groups).


*I witnessed her getting kick backs from various venues on both trips. I also saw her bribe guards in Greece.
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18736 on: January 06, 2013, 03:52:21 PM »
   Several of the crafters in my family have had a tradition of decorating a small ( table top) tree with "take away" ornaments, this has been a tradition for longer than I can remember ( I am 51) . These are hand made and range from the very simple to the very beautiful. The tradition is that each person who comes over is encouraged to take ONE ornament home with them. One per person is the rule.
   One aunt (Terry)  has the creativity to make several different types/designs for her tree. Today we had the family Christmas get together at this aunt's home and several folks noticed her tree was already down. Another aunt ( Beth) make the remark to Terry that she must have given all her "take out orders" away already. At this Terry told us the tale of Susie Snowflake and her mother. 
   Susie Snowflake's mother is the friend of a friend of Terry's who had asked Terry to alter a dress for Susie. Terry agreed and when Susie and Mommy Snowflake came for the fitting, they noticed the tree and Terry, following the tradition told them that they could have one each and went to her sewing room to get some of her tools for the fitting. When she returned she noticed that Susie had several ornaments in her hands and was trying to get more off the tree. Terry reminded her that she could only have one and Susie wanted to know "Why? I want one of each!" Terry replied the limit was one person so that everyone who came could have one. Susie's reply was "I don't CARE about other people, I want one of each!" complete with foot stamp and yelling.  Terry looked at Mommy Snowflake for help and Mommy just smiled. So Terry went over and gently removed all but one ornament from the child's grasp and invited them to leave her home.  At this point Mommy Snowflake spoke up with "If you would just give her what she wants, this could all be so simple."  Terry again told them that the rule is one person - and Susie at that point threw the ornament she was given at Terry and shouted "If I can't have all of those, I don't want any!" and at this point Terry TOLD them to leave.
  Terry was so upset about it, that rather than re-decorate the denuded tree, she just took it down, that was the first week of Advent - so most of Terry's Holiday guests were not able to participate in the 50+ year tradition because of the one greedy, indulged child and a mother who thinks nothing of her child's behavior.
 

The bolded just made my jaw drop. Depending on Susie's age, her actions could be forgiven. But her mother's reaction is doing her daughter a disservice so huge it's out of this world.

 Susie in third grade. Old enough to know better.

She sounds like Veruca Salt from Willy Wonka.  "Don't care how, I want it NOW!"

As for picky eating, I think sometimes it can be due to permissive parents while other times it's because the child has a lot of legitimate aversions.  My parents made me eat whatever was served but when my brother came around and only wanted to eat a few select things, they didn't make him eat what was served.   So they'd tell me "Eat your veggies, we don't care if you think it tastes funny!" whereas if my brother turned up his nose he got chicken nuggets and plain noodles.  He learned that he could get whatever he wanted if he refused what they put on his plate.

When he was 11 he gave up the picky eating and would eat whatever was served and hasn't been picky ever since. Incidentally that's around the time he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and hit a big growth spurt so I think combined they had a lot to do with giving up his picky ways.
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rain

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18737 on: January 06, 2013, 04:03:58 PM »
I (almost) ran into a special snowflake today.

I was driving in a parking lot and an older man (looked to be in his 50's) walked out from between 2 huge SUVs that were parked and walked in front of me - he didn't even look before he walked out  :o - good thing I was quick to hit the breaks (I drive a van, so I don't think he would have missed seeing me - if he'd checked)
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Wench

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18738 on: January 06, 2013, 04:40:31 PM »
Quote
I had the same problem in HS on trip to Greece and another to Scotland/England. Except it wasn't the kids - it was the chaperons. It was less of a problem in Greece - because there weren't as many US chains especially on the Islands. But the flipped out at a Greek food and dancing dinner we went to, because we were handed shot glasses of ouzo as we walked in. Everyone except a few of the seniors was under 18, which was the legal drinking age I think. Thing is I'm pretty sure that our unethical tour director* had lied to the venue and said we were a University group not a HS group. I don't think we would have been allowed in if they known we were all underaged. 

Kherbert05 I believe the drinking age is 18 but I'm not sure it has always been this way.  When I went to Greece in 1998, I was 14 and was able to buy alcohol.  My mother would give me money to go to buy a beer for her to drink.  She wouldn't have let me do this if it was illegal so I'm not sure what was going on then! 

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18739 on: January 06, 2013, 05:02:15 PM »
I was in Target today. I went to get the a drink from their cafe, and ran into 2 families of snow flakes.

Family 1
The server spoke perfect English but with a Spanish/Mexican accent. The family including 4/5 yo spoke with some European accent that I can't Identify except to say it was not English, Irish, Scottish, or German. It is hard to explain but the grandmother was treating the server like something you scrape off the bottom of your shoe. It was in the attitude and tone. The Grandmother got mad because they were out of something. She asked questions about a sandwich that was on the menu - except I don't think she realized it was 2 different sandwiches. When the server told grandma that the sandwich on top had chicken and marinara sauce then started to say The bottom sandwich has - grandma snapped and said the picture had other stuff in it. The sandwich with "other stuff" was on the bottom. She ordered the sandwich (which was labeled made fresh), then huffed and puffed when the server said it would be 5 minutes. She cancelled that order and asked if the hot dogs were ready (they are on the little rolly things). Then grandmother got mad because they were out of pretzels . She pointed to the ones in the case and was told those are plastic - they look plastic. At this point Grandma turns to me and says "Don't you wish they hire (sic) people that could speak English right" :o  I smiled at the server and said, "Her English is fine" Grandma huffed off. I don't know if Grandma just wasn't reading the clear signage or if she didn't understand it.

Family #2
The line is set up so you go by bottled drinks and chips, then get to the counter were you order things. I was behind family #1. Family #2 comes down the line the wrong way so they are standing in front of Family #1. They let Family #1 out. When the server turns to me - they try to barge in front saying they were next. Server says no this nice lady has been waiting for a while. She gives me my cup. The family blocks the exit and tries to make me go backwards. I'm stubborn. I stand there, server starts helping person behind me. Family #2 huffs, we have a child (I bite my tongue and don't make a sarcastic remark like "Glad you noticed, grow up and show him how adults act"). They stomp off and go to the end of the line.

I spoke to the manager about how she was polite even when people were being flat out rude.
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nuit93

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18740 on: January 06, 2013, 08:21:30 PM »
I believe this is a case of a true picky eater and not a super taster.

A coworker had gone on a university trip abroad with a small group.  One girl in the group refused to eat anywhere that was not an American chain restaurant.  The small group didn't want to split up, so the entire time they were there, they ate at McDonald's, Pizza Hut, Burger King, etc. instead of eating any local food.

(I would not have been so nice.  Trying new things is part of the experience for me.)


I had the same problem in HS on trip to Greece and another to Scotland/England. Except it wasn't the kids - it was the chaperons. It was less of a problem in Greece - because there weren't as many US chains especially on the Islands. But the flipped out at a Greek food and dancing dinner we went to, because we were handed shot glasses of ouzo as we walked in. Everyone except a few of the seniors was under 18, which was the legal drinking age I think. Thing is I'm pretty sure that our unethical tour director* had lied to the venue and said we were a University group not a HS group. I don't think we would have been allowed in if they known we were all underaged. 


In England I flat out refused to walk into a McDonalds - which shocked everyone. I told them I didn't eat there in the US why would I travel across the Atlantic Ocean to eat it. I pointed out several places near by with similar prices but better food. Besides if they were going to keep dragging me to Laura Ashley shops instead of going to museums or historical sites, they could at least let me eat a decent meal. The Principal was in charge of our group - and shocked everyone by letting us to to a pub for lunch. We got to eat local restaurants the rest of the trip for lunch. (We had to stay with our grade-level group, instead of having different interest based groups).


*I witnessed her getting kick backs from various venues on both trips. I also saw her bribe guards in Greece.

That reminds me of when I was in Germany in...1999, I think.  I was 17 and with a bunch of other students from my HS, we ranged from 14-18.  I was surprised that the McDonald's food was actually tastier than the fast food back home.

Also, the drinking laws weren't really enforced there.  The law as I understood it was 16 for beer/wine and 18 for hard alcohol, but the 14 year olds in our group joined the rest of us at the bar with no issues.

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18741 on: January 06, 2013, 10:23:22 PM »


 Susie in third grade. Old enough to know better.

Well, considering her mother makes the policy that others should give her child whatever she wants to avoid tantrums, Susie might NOT know better. Mommy has basically taught her that if she's greedy and unpleasant, she'll be given her way.

gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18742 on: January 06, 2013, 10:26:00 PM »


 Susie in third grade. Old enough to know better.

Well, considering her mother makes the policy that others should give her child whatever she wants to avoid tantrums, Susie might NOT know better. Mommy has basically taught her that if she's greedy and unpleasant, she'll be given her way.

Obviously I don't know, but I'm guessing that doesn't work too well for Susie in school.  Teachers (and the other kids) have a way of getting pretty annoyed with the Susies of the world. 

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18743 on: January 06, 2013, 10:49:46 PM »

Over Thanksgiving, my parents scheduled a photo shoot for a family picture with a very well known photographer.  I have to admit, this guy was good. 

In the very best picture of the entire family, DH appeared to be standing a bit apart from my brothers and me.  It worked, since DH is a lot taller than my family of shrimps, but my husband HATES the picture because he feels it makes him look "separated" from the rest of the family.

You know, I don't quite agree.  I don't think your husband was a special snowflake at all. 

If this photographer is really that good, s/he should have realized that there was an unnatural and awkward separation of one person from the rest of the group and corrected that on the spot before that shutter ever clicked.  That's kind of Basic Photography 101.

Height differences can be compensated for in many ways.  One example would be by having some family members slightly seated on a high stool or something.  And then of course there's always the magic of Photoshop for "after fixing".

I think your husband's feelings were hurt and I can kind of see that. :-\

We have a picture like that in our family, and it's my husband who looks *smaller* than he really is, because he was seated on a stool and quite a bit behind everyone else. It puts him in the frame, but it completely changed his *scale*; he looks like someone w/ a smaller skeleton.

I wouldn't make him hang it up in our house.

Margo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18744 on: January 07, 2013, 07:34:06 AM »
Picky eaters may be super-tasters, but it's not necessarily the case. I know people that claim that is why they are picky, but they will eat things that a true super-taster wouldn't touch, while claiming that their "super-tasting" is what makes them not eat something that has nothing to do with the mutation.
I''m curious about the 'things a true super taster wouldn't touch' part of this comment - surely this wouldn't be the same for every person? If you're a super taster you have a much more acture sense of taste than most people, but like anyone else you still have your own individual likes and dislikes.

 For instance - my sister is a 'super taster' - she has an incredibly acute sense of taste and can identify even a tiny amount of something in a dish. The effect of this is that if a dish has even the smallest amount of something she doesn't eat, it makes the whole dish inedible (she can't just pick out the offending items as the taste with 'taint' what is left. One of the things she can't eat is mushrooms.

However, she is quite an adventurous eater and likes some things which you might think someone with acute sense of taste would not like - strongly spiced foods, hot curry etc. She is fine with those provided that they don't contain any of the specific things she can't eat, such as mushrooms or  cinnamon.

She seems to have inherited the 'super taster' ability from our dad, (although his is much less acute now, as he has almost lost his sense of smell) but the specific things it applies to are different - my sister can't bear mushrooms - my dad loves them. My dad cannot eat raw tomato (literally cannot. it triggers a gag reflex) or cheese. My sister loves both.

The SS picky eaters reminded me of a child who went on the same overseas school trip as I did, once. She was about 12, and would not eat anything which wasn't exactly the same as what she had a home,to the extent of being unwilling to eat the chips (fries) because they weren't the same size as the ones her mum made.  It turned out that she was also horribly homesick. She had never (and I do mean never) spent a night away from her own house and parents - she'd never even had a sleepover at a freind's house, or stayed with relations. It got to the point where the school was on the verge of sending her home early on health grounds, although she did start eating when she was told that that would happen. I'm not sure that I'd class her as a SS, as I think she was mostly just horribly homesick and out of her depth, but I did think that her parents were a bit daft, to have sent her abroad, for a week, when she'd never spent a night away from home before...

Giggity

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18745 on: January 07, 2013, 08:15:43 AM »
Thank you for posting that. I also get annoyed by the suggestion that picky eaters were "spoiled" by permissive parents.

Why? A lot of them are.

And you know this, how?

Of the ones I know, as I said above all children, I know their parents and I've seen it happen. "Oh honey, it's okay, you don't have to eat the nasty grown-up food if you want, I'll make you some mac and cheese." Where I come from, making an entire extra meal to cater to a child's want is spoiling the child.
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Rohanna

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18746 on: January 07, 2013, 09:04:42 AM »
Margo: supertasters, in general, don't just "taste better" than other people. They specifically pick up one or more types of flavours more strongly than others.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supertaster

So to have someone claim that they won't eat brocolli because they are a supertaster, while they are cheerfully eating kale, drinking coffee, and love dry wine- and they've never been professionally diagnosed as one- well, it's more likely they just don't like brocolli- since they eat many of the other common food categories.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18747 on: January 07, 2013, 09:32:26 AM »
Margo: supertasters, in general, don't just "taste better" than other people. They specifically pick up one or more types of flavours more strongly than others.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supertaster

So to have someone claim that they won't eat brocolli because they are a supertaster, while they are cheerfully eating kale, drinking coffee, and love dry wine- and they've never been professionally diagnosed as one- well, it's more likely they just don't like brocolli- since they eat many of the other common food categories.

While I wouldn't call myself a supertaster, I do experience this with several things, including black pepper. To me, anything that contains it, that's all I can taste, and it burns my mouth like crazy. The same thing with walnuts. I detest the taste of them, and anything I might eat that has them in it, that's all I taste, even the most delicious, fudgy, gooey brownie. So I just try and avoid these ingredients.

wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18748 on: January 07, 2013, 10:33:52 AM »

While I wouldn't call myself a supertaster, I do experience this with several things, including black pepper. To me, anything that contains it, that's all I can taste, and it burns my mouth like crazy. The same thing with walnuts. I detest the taste of them, and anything I might eat that has them in it, that's all I taste, even the most delicious, fudgy, gooey brownie. So I just try and avoid these ingredients.


This is me. I don't like the taste of blackpepper, walnuts, cilantro, and oregano. I will use a small amount of black pepper when I am cooking, but I won't use any of the others. I detest Pizza Hut pizza because of the oregano. I love mexican food, but I always ask for them to omit the cilantro.


Ms_Cellany

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #18749 on: January 07, 2013, 11:06:04 AM »
For the black pepper supertasters - try white pepper.  The Sweetie can't stand black pepper and says even a tiny bit overwhelms the taste of anything it's in. I experimented and found that white pepper doesn't do that.
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