Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5768531 times)

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hobish

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19035 on: January 18, 2013, 04:57:11 PM »
Quote
once you think about it, their meaning is crystal clear.

Uh-oh.  I must be dumb, because I still can't figure out what "choke grinds" means.   :D  "Broke da mouth" makes a lot of sense, though. 

(Reminds me of when a Southern contestant on Survivor used the expression "So good, makes you wanna slap your mama."  I was all "Um, what?  What did your poor mother do to you?"   ;D)
I apologize.  Goes to show me that not everyone sees things the way I do.  You are not dumb; I'm dense. ;)

"Choke" means an overabundance.  As in, enough to choke an elephant.
"Grinding" is eating and "grinds" are what you eat.  If you are really hungry, the motion of your arm continuously moving food from the plate to your mouth resembles a grinding action.

So "choke grinds" is enough food to choke an elephant, which is what we ordered.

I love your reference to that Southern expression because, while I understand the phrase through the context in which it was used, I thought the same thing as you - Why would I want to slap my mother?

My own mother thinks that phrase is hilarious, especially if she is in a giggly mood. We're not Southern, though.
It's alright, man. I'm only bleeding, man. Stay hungry, stay free, and do the best you can.
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CuriousParty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19036 on: January 18, 2013, 07:45:41 PM »
I have always been allowed to accompany my child whenever she's had something done in a hospital, doctor's office, dentist's office .... anywhere.  I would not be happy to be told I couldn't go with her into the procedure room.

That is why we left a kid's dentist after one visit. J is special needs and he was young and scared. I went back to settle him down and all was well, so I went to the waiting room. On the door to the room was a sign (obviously for the workers at the office) **Keep This Door Locked At All Times**

Ah, no. I am not going to be **locked out** of the area that my children are in while they are receiving medical procedures, even if it is just a cleaning. If I hear my special needs child scream, you can bet I want to get back there, see what is going on, and do damage control so he won't refuse to go to the dentist for the rest of his life.

I don't mind being told I can't go into the procedure room, but I strongly object to being locked out of it.

ETA: This part of the thread is reminding me of this blog post: http://type1anautoimmunething.blogspot.com/2011/03/shot-of-versed-with-chaser-of-crazy.html
It took about 5 of us to hold J down after he was given versed!

The door needs to be locked so that any nefarious people cannot just wander back there willy nilly and violate all sorts of HIPA laws.  It's for privacy, not lock parents away from their children.

Well, that, and/or to limit the distance the "runners" can go.  Usually there needs to be at least one locked door between treatment locations and an outside door that could let a panicked (or oppositional) child into a dangerous situation (e.g., parking lot).

greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19037 on: January 18, 2013, 07:53:35 PM »
I imagine the closed door (because, in order for a door to lock, it must first be closed) mitigates the scary noises coming from the back as well. 

My doctor's office has a limited service dental clinic and they have signs prominently stating that no one can come back with their children during the procedure, as the dental office is simply too small to accommodate the presence of extra people.


Today I witnessed another pair of SS mycarisabus - one just whooshed up the bus lane, and I'm guessing had just turned up the lane by accident, but one green minivan distinguished itself by not only first driving north up the southbound lane of the bus only side of the street, but by then u-turning at a railroad track and driving south about a block down the northbound lane of the car side - nearly hitting another car or two in the southbound lane when they merged in.  I'm so glad the light at the end of the street was on "Buses go forward" when they did this, because otherwise they probably would have hit another car head-on.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19038 on: January 18, 2013, 08:00:57 PM »
When my oldest was 4, he had to have surgery for a hernia and they let me know I could stay with him until he fell asleep and then I would be expected to leave the OR, which I was fine with.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Reika

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19039 on: January 18, 2013, 11:39:42 PM »
I encountered I'mintoobigofahurrytopayattentiontoothersus today.

My work is in a moderate sized office building with over 1k people that work there regularly and we often have more people coming and going. As I was ambling along in the herd of folks going to the elevators, someone came bulling their way through the crowd.

Said person managed to get caught on my purse, feeling the tug, I asked "Give me a moment."

Or rather, started to say. The person yanked hard and took off. In the process they ripped out one end of a strap on my purse, so now I have to figure out how the heck I can repair it.

Wish I'd been able to see who it was, but there was too big of a press of people and the person (couldn't tell if the person was male or female) so I get them to pay for a repair or replacement.

So now I need to figure out how to repair the thing. Normally I'd resort to duct tape, but it's too nice for that.

Shoo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19040 on: January 18, 2013, 11:42:57 PM »
I encountered I'mintoobigofahurrytopayattentiontoothersus today.

My work is in a moderate sized office building with over 1k people that work there regularly and we often have more people coming and going. As I was ambling along in the herd of folks going to the elevators, someone came bulling their way through the crowd.

Said person managed to get caught on my purse, feeling the tug, I asked "Give me a moment."

Or rather, started to say. The person yanked hard and took off. In the process they ripped out one end of a strap on my purse, so now I have to figure out how the heck I can repair it.

Wish I'd been able to see who it was, but there was too big of a press of people and the person (couldn't tell if the person was male or female) so I get them to pay for a repair or replacement.

So now I need to figure out how to repair the thing. Normally I'd resort to duct tape, but it's too nice for that.

I think if you take it to a shoe repair shop, they might be able to fix it for you.

doodlemor

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19041 on: January 18, 2013, 11:45:55 PM »
I encountered I'mintoobigofahurrytopayattentiontoothersus today.

My work is in a moderate sized office building with over 1k people that work there regularly and we often have more people coming and going. As I was ambling along in the herd of folks going to the elevators, someone came bulling their way through the crowd.

Said person managed to get caught on my purse, feeling the tug, I asked "Give me a moment."

Or rather, started to say. The person yanked hard and took off. In the process they ripped out one end of a strap on my purse, so now I have to figure out how the heck I can repair it.

Wish I'd been able to see who it was, but there was too big of a press of people and the person (couldn't tell if the person was male or female) so I get them to pay for a repair or replacement.

So now I need to figure out how to repair the thing. Normally I'd resort to duct tape, but it's too nice for that.

I'm sorry about your purse.  Maybe a shoe repair shop could repair it, or a place that does riding tack.

snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19042 on: January 18, 2013, 11:56:04 PM »
My sister reminded me of this one from a couple of years ago:

I was visiting my sister who lives about 3 hours away from me and we took a knitting class at a local shop that was advertised as an adult class and "get away from your kids and relax with a coffee, a glass of wine or whatever helps you relax"  I got there about 45 minutes early and took a seat next to where the instructor had her place set up, from the earlier class, she was cleaning up the area  before starting our "class"   I had a cup of coffee that I was drinking and a thermos in my bag, for later.
  Another woman came in about 10 minutes later had a glass of something in her hand - and a thermos in her bag. she sat directly opposite me. My sister arrived next and sat next to me and others filled in around . About 5 minutes before the class a woman and her young daughter walked in and announced that the child ( 7-9 in appearance) was going to be part of the class and therefor "there will be no drinking here" , instructor said nothing.
  The girl walked up to me and said "You need to move. NOW. This is my seat." I politely refused and the mother told me to move, that her kid needed that seat. I refused again. And the instructor finally piped up with no only was this an adult class, but that it was advertised as an adult get away evening and that I would be staying were I was.  She then ASKED the child and her mother to leave. Mother replied that they had been allowed to sign up and therefor they were staying - and that there would be no drinking in front of the kid. Out of the 7 other woman 4 protested this and said they were not refraining. Mother and child took the only two  seats left - and mother spent the evening complaining about folks drinking ( no one had more than one glass of wine and then switched to tea or coffee) and the child took over the class - any time the instructor went to help someone the kid got out of her seat, pushed in and said "kids come first, I need help NOW"  or some variation on the theme. Several times the instructor told her it was so and so's turn and she needed to wait her turn. and the kid would  just shove back in and shove her work in front of the instructor and would repeat this until she got her "help" - mom did nothing all evening to help with her kid.
About 3/4 of the way through the event - the shop owner came in and said "Why is Sadie here, Clementine, I told you I would not register her because this was for adults." At this Clementine said "I paid for two people and I brought her as my second!" Owner repeated that she had told Clementine that Sadie was not welcome, and that Clementine said she was bringing Florence, her older sister. And Clementine repeated "I paid for two people, Florence decided she did not want to come, so I brought Sadie, since I paid for two people."
  Owner asked how this had impacted the evening and people told her about not getting help, being told not drink and my sister told her that neither of us had received ANY help with our projects at all and that they had tried to force me to move -even though I was the first one there.  Owner walked out and went to her office. 
  My sister and I gave up and went home, we got a call the next day offering us a repeat of the ecent for free, which we refused since no one did anything substantial to curb Sadie and Clementine -we will not return to this shop,ever.
  This store just opened about a month prior to this  and I don't hold much hope for it to succeed - they allow the SS behavior and their prices are much too high, I'll be interested to see if it is still there next time I visit.

Reika

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19043 on: January 19, 2013, 05:49:49 AM »
Thank you for the idea, Shoo and doodlemoor! It takes forever for me to find a purse, and this one I've only had for a few months.

Now to see if any such places exist near me. :)

suzieQ

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19044 on: January 19, 2013, 09:05:47 AM »
I have always been allowed to accompany my child whenever she's had something done in a hospital, doctor's office, dentist's office .... anywhere.  I would not be happy to be told I couldn't go with her into the procedure room.

That is why we left a kid's dentist after one visit. J is special needs and he was young and scared. I went back to settle him down and all was well, so I went to the waiting room. On the door to the room was a sign (obviously for the workers at the office) **Keep This Door Locked At All Times**

Ah, no. I am not going to be **locked out** of the area that my children are in while they are receiving medical procedures, even if it is just a cleaning. If I hear my special needs child scream, you can bet I want to get back there, see what is going on, and do damage control so he won't refuse to go to the dentist for the rest of his life.

I don't mind being told I can't go into the procedure room, but I strongly object to being locked out of it.

ETA: This part of the thread is reminding me of this blog post: http://type1anautoimmunething.blogspot.com/2011/03/shot-of-versed-with-chaser-of-crazy.html
It took about 5 of us to hold J down after he was given versed!

The door needs to be locked so that any nefarious people cannot just wander back there willy nilly and violate all sorts of HIPA laws.  It's for privacy, not lock parents away from their children.

Well, that, and/or to limit the distance the "runners" can go.  Usually there needs to be at least one locked door between treatment locations and an outside door that could let a panicked (or oppositional) child into a dangerous situation (e.g., parking lot).

It was just different from other children's dentists in our area. The one we ended up using for years had doors between the waiting area and treatment area, but they were not locked, and  I was actually encouraged to go back with J to keep him calm.

Oh and the dentist office with locked doors had a receptionist that stayed at her desk, so she could have stopped any "nefarious" people from coming back and violating HIPPA. I could understand locking the door when she went to the bathroom, etc. But the "keep door locked at all times" sign just made me nervous. I had never seen a sign like that at any office I had ever been to.

And the panicked child explanation reminds me of a conversation I had with our "lab nurse" at J's doctor. J will be 16 this month and until 1 year or so ago, he had to be seriously talked down or sometimes restrained for shots/blood draws. The nurse told me once he was really doing well - she had a much older patient (still a teen) who managed to break free and run into the parking lot!

Oh and dental memories just keep coming. I had to take DD to have several teeth pulled/cut out when she had braces. My Mom recommended a certain oral surgeon so we went to him.
DD had the work done, but she told me later that it hurt when he was pulling, that she wasn't numb enough and that he just kept going. So I told him about the problem before the next visit, thinking he would do a better job of numbing her.
 (of course, I should have just not taken her back as I'm sure she made it known to him that he was hurting her and he ignored her. I was young, I was dumb.)

He said he would put her under so it would be painless. (not nitrous oxide but using an IV to put her to sleep) Ok. To the back she went, and I stayed out front. After that visit she told me he tried to pull the teeth without putting her under! After assuring both of us he would not do such a thing! She kicked him and he decided that putting her to sleep would be the best thing after all. We never went back to him again.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 09:14:42 AM by suzieQ »
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Otterpop

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19045 on: January 19, 2013, 10:29:07 AM »
suzieQ, you just reminded me of my greatest parenting shame.

Same scenario:  DD had baby teeth that needed to come out prior to braces.  Oral surgeon assured me this would be an easy case and no general anesthesia would be necessary.  Cue me helping hold her down while they administered numbing injection after numbing injection.  Once she was "numb" they took her to a back room to perform the extractions.

I paced the waiting room for two hours, asking after DD and getting the "I'll go check on her" from the receptionist, who disappeared and was replaced by another staff member.  Finally, I was about to storm back room when they opened the door and revealed a nighmarish operating theater and a DD who was crumpled in a swollen heap.  I bundled her home where she told me she never numbed properly.  She felt the whole thing and the surgeon proceeded telling her it was "all in her head."

She now has to be sedated to go to the dentist, doctor, medical lab, etc.  Also, she's had a couple therapy sessions for medical PTSD.  Previous to this, DD had stitches, vaccinations with no trauma.  I will NEVER put my complete trust in a medical professional again, no matter how many PhDs after his/her name.

The SS part of this:  At our follow up appt. DD told Dr. she felt the whole procedure and he dismissed it saying "Some people interpret the tugging and pulling as pain.  It did not actually hurt."  :o

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19046 on: January 19, 2013, 10:44:57 AM »
suzieQ, you just reminded me of my greatest parenting shame.

Same scenario:  DD had baby teeth that needed to come out prior to braces.  Oral surgeon assured me this would be an easy case and no general anesthesia would be necessary.  Cue me helping hold her down while they administered numbing injection after numbing injection.  Once she was "numb" they took her to a back room to perform the extractions.

I paced the waiting room for two hours, asking after DD and getting the "I'll go check on her" from the receptionist, who disappeared and was replaced by another staff member.  Finally, I was about to storm back room when they opened the door and revealed a nighmarish operating theater and a DD who was crumpled in a swollen heap.  I bundled her home where she told me she never numbed properly.  She felt the whole thing and the surgeon proceeded telling her it was "all in her head."

She now has to be sedated to go to the dentist, doctor, medical lab, etc.  Also, she's had a couple therapy sessions for medical PTSD.  Previous to this, DD had stitches, vaccinations with no trauma.  I will NEVER put my complete trust in a medical professional again, no matter how many PhDs after his/her name.

The SS part of this:  At our follow up appt. DD told Dr. she felt the whole procedure and he dismissed it saying "Some people interpret the tugging and pulling as pain.  It did not actually hurt."  :o

Ooooh, that is one of my biggest pet peeves... doctors who think they know your body better than you.
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CharlieBraun

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19047 on: January 19, 2013, 11:39:07 AM »
I wonder if, given the large commonality of "Children-at-the-Doc Horror/SS Stories" in this thread, that it might need to have its own home.
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19048 on: January 19, 2013, 12:06:51 PM »
I wonder if, given the large commonality of "Children-at-the-Doc Horror/SS Stories" in this thread, that it might need to have its own home.

This is one situation where that makes sense.  :)
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doodlemor

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19049 on: January 19, 2013, 12:56:01 PM »
Thank you for the idea, Shoo and doodlemoor! It takes forever for me to find a purse, and this one I've only had for a few months.

Now to see if any such places exist near me. :)

Apparently I didn't pay attention when I posted, because Shoo posted about the shoe repair several minutes before I did.

If you live within a reasonable distance to any Amish, you could probably find someone who works with leather and makes tack for horses.

Another idea - why don't you email the customer service of the manufacturer?  Maybe they would fix it at a discount, since it is still relatively new.