Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 4411205 times)

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2littlemonkeys

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19920 on: March 07, 2013, 01:22:45 PM »


*Cough*

Yes, it exists!  One of the women on my float for Mardi Gras had one!  ;D

Holy cow, the first review on that page is HYSTERICAL!

GAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!  I just about died at the end when the writer talked about sizing.   ;D

Virg

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19921 on: March 07, 2013, 01:51:56 PM »
Pen^2 wrote:

"Ooh, I've had that happen, too. It was 5c, but still, I'm the type of person who sums things as I go and expects a certain amount of change before I get to the register. So when I get my change, I point out that 'it looks like you forgot 5c here' and all of a sudden I'm the cheapest person on earth."

I used to work in a bank, and I'm very familiar with what you describe here.  Whenever someone who shorts change responds in that way, it's a very good indicator that they're skimming and trying to shame the target into letting the matter drop.  I fired more than one teller for that attitude and I'd call for the manager if I ever got a response other than "whoops, let me check that" to pointing out short change.

whatsanenigma wrote:

"Imagine if you worked at, for example, a fast food place, and managed to cheat every customer out of a quarter, or even a dime.  That would add up pretty darn quickly.  Especially because each individual person might not want to complain over that amount."

Precisely.

Virg

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19922 on: March 07, 2013, 01:52:43 PM »
My special pet peeve about that ninety cents (or any small fine for a library book) is that a patron will make a HUGE fuss about it and then pull out a hundred dollar bill (despite signs clearly stating that, as we are a library and not a bank, we can only accept twenty dollar bills) and scream bloody murder because we can't change a hundred.  This despite the fact that wrapped up in that hundred is a huge wad of one dollar bills. If I had a dime..

If you had a dime, you could give them change for their dollar when they paid their 90-cent fine  8)

Amara

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19923 on: March 07, 2013, 02:01:54 PM »
Quite a while ago, I remember reading an account of someone who worked at a major, high-end department store. This person dealt with the customer accounts before computers, I think, or at least when they weren't yet all that common. She stole thousands upon thousands of dollars by skimming only the cents from customer accounts. Their customers didn't bother much if any with the "change" so that's how the person got away with it for so long.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19924 on: March 07, 2013, 02:10:41 PM »
This is partially a 'I'm never shopping there again!' story too, but I once had a kid at a Taco Bell drive-through try to cheat me out of 10 cents.  One thin dime. When I pointed it out, he gave it to me while muttering, 'I never heard anyone b***** about a dime before'.

Well buddy, it's MY DIME!

Ooh, I've had that happen, too. It was 5c, but still, I'm the type of person who sums things as I go and expects a certain amount of change before I get to the register. So when I get my change, I point out that 'it looks like you forgot 5c here' and all of a sudden I'm the cheapest person on earth.

Again: it's my money, and it's not up to you to decide if it's not enough for me to want.

Besides, that loose change really adds up. DH and I toss our loose change into a big plastic bottle at the end of the week. The bottle is about halfway full at this point. When it's completely full we plan on cashing it in and doing something fun with the money. Heck, I stop and pick up any coins I see on the ground when I'm out and about. My place of employment seems especially prone to loose change. I joke with my co-workers that I made 25 cents (or whatever amount I find that day) walking from my car to the building.

I do that too, and  I just bought the entire "Dear America Series" with what I cashed it.  It certainly does add up and I agree anyone doing that looses my business and if it's a chain place - a letter to corporate.

My youngest son is a change finder.  He's constantly looking at the ground and under store shelves.  I make him stash all his finds in a jar, and at the end of the month we take it to the bank. He makes roughly $20-$30 every month by picking up small change.  Every so often it's supplemented by larger finds,(he's found quite a few singles, some fives and tens, and even a twenty). This is how he finances his Lego habit.

Craftyone

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19925 on: March 07, 2013, 03:50:17 PM »
Australia has one of the highest usages of EFTPOS worldwide which means less loose change plus our smallest coin is 5 cents, which people tend to pick up if they drop it. It's rare to see coins lying around on the pavement here these days.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19926 on: March 07, 2013, 03:54:35 PM »
I hate change in my wallet, so I bought one of those jars that counts it ( on clearance). I cash it in about every 6 months or so, and use it for "fun" Whether it be girl's weekend away, or something else, and then I start all over again. I usually end up with about $50-80 each time.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19927 on: March 07, 2013, 04:09:24 PM »
Quote from: Carotte link=topic=51263.msg2901376#msg2901376 date
There's also the times when one of my parents will call someone in the living room, while we are watching TV, and expect the TV-watcher to turn the volume down  :o. I was quick to put my foot down here, you can move and call from somewhere more quiet, I can't just take the TV under my arm and go elsewhere.

My parents are particularly bad at this. When I lived with them they would turn it down and keep talking, I hated that as it meant I listened to their conversation instead of watching the show. But I couldn't ever question them. And of course, if they passed the phone to me I was expected to go into another room!

DH and I rarely watch free to air TV, so we usually can pause it if done calls. If not, person on phone goes away.

And we won't answer it during dinner!

Miss March

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19928 on: March 07, 2013, 04:30:07 PM »
I believe that I may have already posted about this woman here before, but when I was working at a hotel, we had an elderly woman staying with us who would swing by the front desk and buy something small (say a magazine, or some stamps) and if it came to $3.85, she would hand us three dollars and then wave her hand dismissively and say that she'd get us the change "later." Of course, we weren't allowed to do that. We needed to key in a purchase of $3.85 into the system and our cash drawer needed to reflect that amount taken in at the end of our shift. So the front desk person would need to insist to this woman that she needed to pay the full amount- even if that meant that we needed a nickel, or 17 cents, or 98 cents more from her. She'd huff and sigh and roll her eyes at us like we were being unreasonable and petty. She tried this every single time she made a purchase with us during her stay. I fear that some of the newer employees that she encountered may have been so intimidated by her manner that they just took change from their own pockets to cover the portion she didn't want to pay, which is what I suspect she wanted all along.
He had no choice, he had told her, and then he left, choosing.-- George R.R. Martin

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19929 on: March 07, 2013, 04:48:01 PM »
I think I'd start rounding up!  If it was over $3, I'd tell her it was $4.  Once she gave me the $4, I could give her change.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19930 on: March 07, 2013, 05:39:11 PM »
Quote from: Carotte link=topic=51263.msg2901376#msg2901376 date
There's also the times when one of my parents will call someone in the living room, while we are watching TV, and expect the TV-watcher to turn the volume down  :o. I was quick to put my foot down here, you can move and call from somewhere more quiet, I can't just take the TV under my arm and go elsewhere.

My parents are particularly bad at this. When I lived with them they would turn it down and keep talking, I hated that as it meant I listened to their conversation instead of watching the show. But I couldn't ever question them. And of course, if they passed the phone to me I was expected to go into another room!

DH and I rarely watch free to air TV, so we usually can pause it if done calls. If not, person on phone goes away.

And we won't answer it during dinner!

I think this is a generational thing.

Growing up, the phone, TV, and most of the family where in one room and you were unable to "take the phone" with you or go to watch TV in a second room with a second TV.  So if the phone rang, the interactive conversation between two people took precendence over someone watching a TV program (unless it was Dad watching the 6pm news, then it took priority  >:()

Once we had a second phone extension and a second TV, a long conversation would be moved to the other extension in the bedroom area, unless it was Dad talking on the phone. Then anyone watching TV had the option just turning it down or moving to the second TV in my parent's bedroom.

So even after cordless phones became common, my parent's would rarely leave the room where the phone was, they'd instead instintively reach to turn down the TV. 

jane7166

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19931 on: March 07, 2013, 07:15:11 PM »
Quote from: Carotte link=topic=51263.msg2901376#msg2901376 date
There's also the times when one of my parents will call someone in the living room, while we are watching TV, and expect the TV-watcher to turn the volume down  :o. I was quick to put my foot down here, you can move and call from somewhere more quiet, I can't just take the TV under my arm and go elsewhere.

My parents are particularly bad at this. When I lived with them they would turn it down and keep talking, I hated that as it meant I listened to their conversation instead of watching the show. But I couldn't ever question them. And of course, if they passed the phone to me I was expected to go into another room!

DH and I rarely watch free to air TV, so we usually can pause it if done calls. If not, person on phone goes away.

And we won't answer it during dinner!

I think this is a generational thing.

Growing up, the phone, TV, and most of the family where in one room and you were unable to "take the phone" with you or go to watch TV in a second room with a second TV.  So if the phone rang, the interactive conversation between two people took precendence over someone watching a TV program (unless it was Dad watching the 6pm news, then it took priority  >:()

Once we had a second phone extension and a second TV, a long conversation would be moved to the other extension in the bedroom area, unless it was Dad talking on the phone. Then anyone watching TV had the option just turning it down or moving to the second TV in my parent's bedroom.

So even after cordless phones became common, my parent's would rarely leave the room where the phone was, they'd instead instintively reach to turn down the TV.

But, it's all still a power play.  My mom would pull the "what I am saying is more important than your TV show" power play.  Until DH and I got a VCR.  Then I would just pause my program, if recorded, or hit the record button while she prattled on and I would just smile at her.  And continue with my program when she ran down. 

rain

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19932 on: March 07, 2013, 07:37:48 PM »
can we get back to the SS stories please
"oh we thank thee lord for the things we need, like the wind and the rain and the apple seed"

EmmaJ.

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19933 on: March 07, 2013, 09:27:51 PM »
can we get back to the SS stories please
I'm puzzled. These all ARE special snowflake stories.

gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #19934 on: March 07, 2013, 09:37:44 PM »
can we get back to the SS stories please
I'm puzzled. These all ARE special snowflake stories.

Thank you, EmmaJ.!  I agree!!

It seems that recently if anyone comes here with a story that involves anything other than driving/traffic/parking issues, there's an immediate reminder that we're getting "off topic".  Some of the stories have been great ones too.  I don't understand either.