Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5416205 times)

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nutraxfornerves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20385 on: April 08, 2013, 11:42:08 AM »
I hang out on a travel forum. "USAnian" (not USian) is commonly used. It is not considered offensive at all, just rather jocular. Wikipedia even has USAnian in their dictionary. I don't think I've ever heard it spoken, however.

And, yes, there are people who are offended when "American" is used to mean someone from the United States.


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LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20386 on: April 08, 2013, 11:48:34 AM »
And, yes, there are people who are offended when "American" is used to mean someone from the United States.

Generally people who are American, but not from the States.  Although I haven't heard many from South America complain. Mostly people from North America. 

I've seen USian on message boards like this, but I haven't heard it spoken.  Doesn't bother me. 
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20387 on: April 08, 2013, 11:58:15 AM »
Here's the thing, though. I've *never* heard "American" used to refer to anyone *but* someone from the United States.  North American, yes.  South American, certainly.  But never just "American".  Kind of like how Israel is on the continent of Asia, but many people would be real confused if someone from Tel Aviv was referred to as an Asian.
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CharlieBraun

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20388 on: April 08, 2013, 12:04:17 PM »
Thanks for the info, I'm American and haven't heard that term.  Honestly, it seems dismissive to call a group of people something they don't call themselves.
I've heard and seen plenty of people from the US use the term--I have.

Totally new one on me, too - I office in Florida and New York, and spend a lot of time in DC as well, if that matters.
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selkiewoman

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20389 on: April 08, 2013, 12:08:36 PM »
USians isn't a familiar term to me either, but the meaning was immediately apparent.  Probably preferable to 'Yanks'. ;D

Mental Magpie

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20390 on: April 08, 2013, 12:13:20 PM »
Here's the thing, though. I've *never* heard "American" used to refer to anyone *but* someone from the United States.  North American, yes.  South American, certainly.  But never just "American".  Kind of like how Israel is on the continent of Asia, but many people would be real confused if someone from Tel Aviv was referred to as an Asian.

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Stormtreader

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20391 on: April 08, 2013, 12:18:39 PM »
Can we move the discussion of "USAians" to its own thread please?

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20392 on: April 08, 2013, 12:22:24 PM »
The Spanish word for USians is a mouthful: estadounidense" (es-TAH-oh-oo-nih-DENSE-ay).

It literally tranlastes as "United Statesian." 
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Virg

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20393 on: April 08, 2013, 12:45:37 PM »
I've seen the term "USian" a lot but I've very rarely heard it spoken.  When it was it was pronounced as if you say the letters U-S-E-N.  I agree with others that I don't see it as particularly offensive.

Now, for my SS story of the day, I was at the grocery in the express line buying several items but visibly well below the limit for the lane.  I unloaded my stuff on the belt, and then someone stepped up beside me (the express lane didn't have anything to one side of it so he approached directly from the side) and put a loaf of bread on top of my stuff on the belt.  His excuse when I asked him why he did that was, "I'm in a hurry."  When the cashier put his item aside, he started to grouse until she told him he'd have to wait or leave.

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Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20394 on: April 08, 2013, 01:40:16 PM »
USians isn't a familiar term to me either, but the meaning was immediately apparent.  Probably preferable to 'Yanks'. ;D

I've heard the term but it isn't preferable to 'Yanks'. 'USians' carries the connotation of being users.  It says that we use the rest of the world and contribute nothing. That isn't true and I don't like it.  No one here uses that term to describe their country of birth or residence.

LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20395 on: April 08, 2013, 01:45:23 PM »
USians isn't a familiar term to me either, but the meaning was immediately apparent.  Probably preferable to 'Yanks'. ;D

I've heard the term but it isn't preferable to 'Yanks'. 'USians' carries the connotation of being users.  It says that we use the rest of the world and contribute nothing. That isn't true and I don't like it.  No one here uses that term to describe their country of birth or residence.

I never read it like Usians, but like You-Ess-ians.  On the other hand, I do dislike "Yanks", but maybe that's because I'm from the northern states and have heard it used in a derogatory way by some from the southern US.

And while I don't say "I'm a USian", I do say "I'm from the US", rather than "I'm an American".
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

Cami

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20396 on: April 08, 2013, 01:59:58 PM »
Thanks for the info, I'm American and haven't heard that term.  Honestly, it seems dismissive to call a group of people something they don't call themselves.
I've heard and seen plenty of people from the US use the term--I have.

Totally new one on me, too - I office in Florida and New York, and spend a lot of time in DC as well, if that matters.
I've lived all over the country and travel extensively for work and never heard the term USians in my life.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20397 on: April 08, 2013, 02:06:53 PM »
USians isn't a familiar term to me either, but the meaning was immediately apparent.  Probably preferable to 'Yanks'. ;D

I've heard the term but it isn't preferable to 'Yanks'. 'USians' carries the connotation of being users.  It says that we use the rest of the world and contribute nothing. That isn't true and I don't like it.  No one here uses that term to describe their country of birth or residence.

Wow.  I don't think it has such a dreadful connotation just because it has a couple of the same letters!

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20398 on: April 08, 2013, 02:07:16 PM »
I've only seen USian here, but I do like it better than "Yank" or "Yankee," both of which have connotations to the US Civil War.

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After reading the thread on word pronunciations, this made me start singing "This lane is your lane, this lane is my lane . . ."

artk2002

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20399 on: April 08, 2013, 02:14:52 PM »
USians isn't a familiar term to me either, but the meaning was immediately apparent.  Probably preferable to 'Yanks'. ;D

I've heard the term but it isn't preferable to 'Yanks'. 'USians' carries the connotation of being users.  It says that we use the rest of the world and contribute nothing. That isn't true and I don't like it.  No one here uses that term to describe their country of birth or residence.

Where did that interpretation come from? I've never heard that connotation before you wrote it here.
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