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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6647369 times)

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MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20610 on: April 23, 2013, 10:05:21 AM »
That reminds me of when my daughters used to be in Brownies.  We parents were told very explicitly that, on meeting nights, we were to walk our children into the church and make sure they were safe.  I was a bit puzzled, because I was planning to do that anyway and couldn't fathom why they felt the need to make a point of that.  It turned out that there was one parent the previous year who had a habit of just dropping off her 8-year-old daughter outside the church and driving away, and one night (unbeknownst to her) the meeting had been cancelled.  Her poor daughter, not having any way of contacting her mother, somehow found her way home in the dark and freezing cold.  :o

I used to take my girls to gymnastics/dance at a studio that had signs all *over* the place, telling parents that they had to actually bring their kids in and not drop them off in the parking lot.  It didn't seem to work, I saw parents doing it all the time.  However, the girls that I saw dropped off tended to be older, middle school or up.  And nowadays, quite possibly had cell phones!  I'm surprised the Brownie mom didn't notice the lack of cars in the parking lot, unless she was used to being one of the first to get there.  I'd imagine you'd at least have a car for the leader and any co-leader, even if all the other parents just did dropoff.
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Dr. F.

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20611 on: April 23, 2013, 10:07:37 AM »

SS#2 must have had a death wish, because I can't believe anyone would do this. The pier at this beach is actually a wharf, with a parking lot, shops and restaurants. When we went walking along the wharf, we witnessed someone driving with an iPad propped up on the steering wheel so they could use it and drive at the same time.

Well, at least they weren't trying to drive while reading a book. I had an acquaintance who once admitted to doing this. I never, ever let her drive me anywhere after that.

Given Kindle apps and other bookreaders are pretty common on iPads, they may very well have been reading a book! (Or a webpage, or a newspaper, or...)

He was probably looking at a map.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20612 on: April 23, 2013, 10:14:43 AM »
My mother sat in the back when me and my sister were little as my sister was more challenging compared to me to get her to stay in one spot quietly then later on was able to move closer to front of the church. I feel she was being polite in what she did until my sister would not dart off into the next county and make a commotion at the same time.

That's exactly what my mother and grandmother did with me, my older sister, and my younger sister when we were kids. We always sat in the back pew of the church so we could step out if need be without disturbing the service. We were actually pretty well-behaved kids (well, me and ODS - YDS was kind of another story, LOL), but of course when we were babies, well, babies cry and fuss when they need something and there's nothing one can do about that. And even older kids can sometimes be unpredictable!

You know what's funny--my previous pastor always suggested that parents w/ little kids sit up front. He said (and he raised 5 boys and was a VERY observant pastor w/ many years of experience) that the little kid felt more involved and was actually EASIER to handle and much more likely to stay focused on what was going on.

It worked w/ my kid, and it worked with other people's little kids.

This is the pastor who also said, "The kid hasn't been born yet that I can't preach over."

My middle son would have taken that as a challenge!  He's my stubborn child.  And he's an intense child.  He's a good kid, but the "how to behave like a human instead of an imp" lessons took a lot longer with him than with the other two.

mmswm, this made me laugh because my DS is exactly like this.  He's only 4, so the lessons are still ongoing, and sometimes I feel like we're failing more than we're succeeding in teaching him. 

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20613 on: April 23, 2013, 10:22:36 AM »
My mother sat in the back when me and my sister were little as my sister was more challenging compared to me to get her to stay in one spot quietly then later on was able to move closer to front of the church. I feel she was being polite in what she did until my sister would not dart off into the next county and make a commotion at the same time.

That's exactly what my mother and grandmother did with me, my older sister, and my younger sister when we were kids. We always sat in the back pew of the church so we could step out if need be without disturbing the service. We were actually pretty well-behaved kids (well, me and ODS - YDS was kind of another story, LOL), but of course when we were babies, well, babies cry and fuss when they need something and there's nothing one can do about that. And even older kids can sometimes be unpredictable!

You know what's funny--my previous pastor always suggested that parents w/ little kids sit up front. He said (and he raised 5 boys and was a VERY observant pastor w/ many years of experience) that the little kid felt more involved and was actually EASIER to handle and much more likely to stay focused on what was going on.

It worked w/ my kid, and it worked with other people's little kids.

This is the pastor who also said, "The kid hasn't been born yet that I can't preach over."

My middle son would have taken that as a challenge!  He's my stubborn child.  And he's an intense child.  He's a good kid, but the "how to behave like a human instead of an imp" lessons took a lot longer with him than with the other two.

mmswm, this made me laugh because my DS is exactly like this.  He's only 4, so the lessons are still ongoing, and sometimes I feel like we're failing more than we're succeeding in teaching him.

What worked for me was getting him involved in a physically intense activity that he enjoyed.  When middle DS was 4.5, he got involved in figure skating. A year later he was skating 6 days a week and competing regularly.  The focus required to skate well, as well as certain life lessons being reinforced by his coach really helped him make that breakthrough from imp to well-behaved (though still impish at times) kid.  Though he no longer skates (ankle injury trying to land a new jump), he does still dance ballet.  He is a child that really needs that physical outlet in order to keep himself together the rest of the day.
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LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20614 on: April 23, 2013, 02:02:42 PM »
Three times today, I've heard him barking, gone out back, and there he sits, not wound up or anything, six feet away from the door.  He just wanted the door open before he started walking toward it.  What a little prince.

Hahahahaha!  He just did it again, I went out and let him off the rope, and he went to the door and stopped.  I opened it further, and he just looked at me.  So I went inside and he followed right behind me. Yesterday he was a prince, today he's a gentleman.

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TeamBhakta

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20615 on: April 23, 2013, 05:54:09 PM »
So 2 SS for the price of one - a Mom who has kids with allergies (peanuts for the brother and it turns out dairy for the sister) who just drops them off without connecting up with anyone and seeing that her kids would be safe, and the person she was supposed to connect with, who didn't bother to let anyone know that she was responsible for them. The chuch leaders didn't like it when I threated to call the police the next year if this happened again. The next year I was not asked to be registrar.

Reminds me of someone who sent their kid to my sample cart last year. I had a 4-ish boy approach for a sample and his parent announced from a couple feet away "IT'S OKAY WITH ME IF HEHAS A SAMPLE." So I handed the kid a sample and he said "Thank you *tilts head* does dis have nuts in it ? *skips away to mom*" Cue me almost having a heart attack.

Experienced some ss waitresses at the former Beloved Mom & Daughter restaurant today:
http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=74341.msg2921596#msg2921596
This restaurant has milkshakes on the menu, but I'd never ordered one there until today. As soon as I asked my waitress for a milkshake, the other waitresses started whooping loudly about "Oh boy *dripping with sarcasm* Suzy Waitress is the best milkshake maker ever. She loves to make milkshakes. If you want a milkshake, you ask Suzy to make it for you." Suzy made some comment to them that it's hard to make this restaurant's milkshakes  ???

The entire time I sat there sipping the milkshake, the waitresses kept repeating over and over, to any customer who'd listen "Oh boy *dripping with sarcasm* Suzy Waitress is the best milkshake maker ever. She loves to make milkshakes. If you want a milkshake, you ask Suzy to make it for you. You should order a milkshake RIGHT NOW. Hey, Suzy, let's put up a special poster saying 'Come to (restaurant) for milkshakes. Suzy will make them for you.' We'll set you up a special corner to make milkshakes." They were still doing that until the moment I left. It made me really uncomfortable. :(

artk2002

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20616 on: April 23, 2013, 06:55:28 PM »
Experienced some ss waitresses at the former Beloved Mom & Daughter restaurant today:
http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=74341.msg2921596#msg2921596
This restaurant has milkshakes on the menu, but I'd never ordered one there until today. As soon as I asked my waitress for a milkshake, the other waitresses started whooping loudly about "Oh boy *dripping with sarcasm* Suzy Waitress is the best milkshake maker ever. She loves to make milkshakes. If you want a milkshake, you ask Suzy to make it for you." Suzy made some comment to them that it's hard to make this restaurant's milkshakes  ???

The entire time I sat there sipping the milkshake, the waitresses kept repeating over and over, to any customer who'd listen "Oh boy *dripping with sarcasm* Suzy Waitress is the best milkshake maker ever. She loves to make milkshakes. If you want a milkshake, you ask Suzy to make it for you. You should order a milkshake RIGHT NOW. Hey, Suzy, let's put up a special poster saying 'Come to (restaurant) for milkshakes. Suzy will make them for you.' We'll set you up a special corner to make milkshakes." They were still doing that until the moment I left. It made me really uncomfortable. :(

What jerks. I wouldn't be shocked if they were found the next day, head down in a butt of melted ice cream. With your testimony, not a jury in the world would convict Suzy.
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BatCity

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20617 on: April 24, 2013, 09:18:33 AM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20618 on: April 24, 2013, 09:25:34 AM »
I was dropping my kids off this morning at a church activity, and found myself rolling my eyes at this particular black SUV.  Every single week this SUV parks in the same spot... right *next* to the parking spots, but not in one.  Basically, she likes to make her own parking space that is the closest to the building.  At first glance it *looks* as though she's in a parking space because she's lined up with them, but she's not, she's parked in the roadway.  She does it every week.  Nowhere near on the level of some of the SS on this thread, but somewhat amusing/eye-rolling to me, anyway.
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Bexx27

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20619 on: April 24, 2013, 09:29:21 AM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.

Actually, I agree with her that kids shouldn't be running around and playing on the playground equipment while snacking. If they need a snack, they can sit or stand still to eat and resume playing when they're finished. Allergies aside, who wants to see crushed bits of food littered all over the playground? It's gross and it attracts pests.
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Virg

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20620 on: April 24, 2013, 09:30:36 AM »
BatCity wrote:

"What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award."

I don't think the author deserves to be called a Special Snowflake over this.  It's the conclusion that saves it, in my regard.  She puts forth a plaintive request that parents put some thought into how snacks like this might affect their kids.  She didn't demand and she didn't insist that people not bring the snacks, just that they try to be more careful about spilling them.  That's a reasonable thing to write an article about, especially because parents should already be vigilant about what essentially qualifies as littering and should make at least a reasonable effort to cut down on it.  Accidents happen, but it's still food for thought (har har).

I will note that the original title of the article was "Please Don't Bring Snacks to the Playground" but the article itself didn't say that and the title has since been changed by the editorial staff, so again I won't the author to blame for a title that didn't accurately reflect the article content.


MommyPenguin wrote:

"Every single week this SUV parks in the same spot... right *next* to the parking spots, but not in one.  Basically, she likes to make her own parking space that is the closest to the building.  At first glance it *looks* as though she's in a parking space because she's lined up with them, but she's not, she's parked in the roadway."

Given that first glance error, it's possible that the driver doesn't realize that the spot isn't a real space, so I'd give a pass until someone in authority can inform her.  If she continues after that I'll definitely agree.

Virg

Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20621 on: April 24, 2013, 09:31:14 AM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.

I'm tempted not to grant the award.  Yes, the request is a bit over the top but parents of children with food allergies are seriously concerned about these issues. 

Also, spilled food can attract creatures like rats that no one wants to encounter and playgrounds are not likely to be thoroughly cleaned everyday.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2013, 09:34:22 AM by Thipu1 »

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20622 on: April 24, 2013, 09:31:31 AM »
I was dropping my kids off this morning at a church activity, and found myself rolling my eyes at this particular black SUV.  Every single week this SUV parks in the same spot... right *next* to the parking spots, but not in one.  Basically, she likes to make her own parking space that is the closest to the building.  At first glance it *looks* as though she's in a parking space because she's lined up with them, but she's not, she's parked in the roadway.  She does it every week.  Nowhere near on the level of some of the SS on this thread, but somewhat amusing/eye-rolling to me, anyway.

There’s a particular SUV thing that picks kids up from the school next door to us that is driven by an SS. We live on a one-way L street, and the school and my house make up the two lots on the outside of the bend. Since the door to pickup kids is also right at the bend, many parents come park along the street to pick their kids up. The particular SS parks on the wrong side of the street (it’s a narrow residential one, so you can’t park on both sides), in the bend of the road, right in front of a fire hydrant and a no parking sign. Every day.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20623 on: April 24, 2013, 09:34:13 AM »
 
Quote
If you do bring snacks, something like fresh fruit is statistically less likely to cause problems than donuts or cheese sticks—though of course statistics aren’t much comfort to the dad of a kid who’s allergic to strawberries. 
Since it's possible that people can be allergic to dingdangity near anything, trying to find a hypo-allergenic snack for your kids to take to the playground is nearly impossible. I'm sorry that the child has such severe allergies, but it's the MOTHER'S job to handle it, not mine.  If I want to bring them cheese sticks, it's HER job to remind her DD that she can't have one, even if I offer to share. It's not my job to think "Oh, we can't take these oatmeal-raisin cookies to the playground.  Some other child there might be allergic to gluten or raisins or eggs."

If her daughter is that severely allergic, and not yet able to understand that she must avoid this, that, and the other, then she should taking the child to public playgrounds.  Maybe she could put up a playground in her own back yard. 
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squeakers

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20624 on: April 24, 2013, 09:35:11 AM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.

Why? Forget the fact that there are many people (not just kids) allergic to many things and just think about the main gist of the article: keep food off of playgrounds.

 Letting your kids throw food around? Yeah, not cool.  Not only is it a mess that could end up staining clothes (melted chocolates) but it also draws bugs (ants and those darn yellowjackets).  Crackers everywhere? Could draw unwanted contact with local wildlife (geese/ducks or squirrels looking for handouts). Plus it just looks gross to see stuff strewn about.

To me it's just as bad when parents go out to eat and leave a huge mess their kid made on the table and under the table and in the aisle.
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