Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5652568 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20685 on: April 24, 2013, 06:26:24 PM »
I saw this in Slate yesterday:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2013/04/food_allergies_and_playgrounds_please_don_t_bring_snacks_to_playgrounds.html

What do you all think? I'm tempted to hand the author the Special Snowflake of the Year award.
I say that the woman has a valid point but takes it a little to far. From a couple of the comments RE: Peanut proteins on hands I'm guessing her child has the extreme form of peanut allergy. That if a child eating cracker jacks does the hand over hand bars - an her child follows her child can have a potentially deadly allergic reaction.


When I was a kid there were places we had to be careful because of the high probability that someone touched that door, railing, seat, armrest with peanuts on their hands. So I wore my "biohazard suit" - long pants, closed toed shoes, short sleeves but with an oversized very light windbreaker. When I had to touch a door, or railing - I pulled my hands inside the sleeves - so I wasn't touching it bare handed. Thing was those places were limited - airplanes, Astrodome (football, baseball, rodeo), Astroworld, and the movies were pretty much it. Because people didn't walk around stuffing their faces all the time. You ate in certain places - not the middle of the department store.


We knew I could react to touching peanut products - but in only happened 2x before I turned 18. First in PK when the teacher physically force me to put my hands in peanutbutter. Second in third grade when the bully smeared peanut butter on me.


Since 2001 - I've landed in the ER 7x all for touching something with traces of peanuts. All but one happened in public venues were eating was not the main focus.


I get her frustration. Kids eating peanut products while playing on the playground are coating it with a toxic to her child substance. Also I agree on a basic level kids should not be eating and runnign around playing at the same time. It is a choking hazard.


On the other side if Loren, Brett and I are having a picnic in the park. I should be able to leave our cooler/basket out while they play.
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Rohanna

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20686 on: April 24, 2013, 06:43:51 PM »
Sorry, if your child is THAT allergic then "uncontrolled" spaces need to be off-limits/monitored for you, not the whole world. I mean, squirrels run around playgrounds and they eat nuts, birds drop nuts and seeds...
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blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20687 on: April 24, 2013, 07:14:31 PM »
Sorry, if your child is THAT allergic then "uncontrolled" spaces need to be off-limits/monitored for you, not the whole world. I mean, squirrels run around playgrounds and they eat nuts, birds drop nuts and seeds...

But they don't leave squishy handprints on the playground equipment.

I can sympathise with her. I have contact allergies and I wear gloves in certain situations. I'd have no skin left otherwise! But she should be able to use the playground without putting her hand in something yucky. Sadly, it sounds like the one they go to has a big littering problem so I don't think she is going to get what she wants.
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Dr. F.

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20688 on: April 24, 2013, 08:19:05 PM »
A cross between SS-ness and pure Darwinism - the people who decided to jaywalk at a crosswalk, but against the walk signal, IMMEDIATELY in front of a fire engine going lights-and-sirens. Don't they realize that those things can't stop on a dime? They didn't even scurry - they strolled casually across the street.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20689 on: April 24, 2013, 09:19:55 PM »
Sorry, if your child is THAT allergic then "uncontrolled" spaces need to be off-limits/monitored for you, not the whole world. I mean, squirrels run around playgrounds and they eat nuts, birds drop nuts and seeds...

The problem is, there's no boundary between "THAT allergic" and "just a little allergic" for many people.  Previous reactions don't necessarily predict future reactions - so if you know you're allergic to peanuts and you've had two mild-to-moderate reactions in the past, you don't know whether the third reaction will be anaphylaxis or whether it will just be a bit of a rash.  A huge percentage of kids nowadays have food allergies (10%, according to the article), and there's no "little bit" when it comes to unknown reactions.  It's a shame, because peanuts are such a good and cheap source of protein, but (as I mentioned upthread) I do think it's polite to moderate your peanut-germ-spreading ability when you're likely to be around children.

iridaceae

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20690 on: April 25, 2013, 01:52:24 AM »
My grandpa told me he put vaseline on the pole that supported their bird feeder, thinking the squirrels would just slide down and not be able to get to it.  No, instead they just climbed up and slid down till they wore all the vaseline off and finally got to the seed.

My mother used butter. Worked like a charm and she would always come back inside giggling over having fooled the squirrels.

Kaora

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20691 on: April 25, 2013, 02:13:32 AM »
I have one, sort of?  Well, I'm not sure, but I'll let eHell judge.

We went to McDonalds the other night.  That'd be my sister, my BF, and I.  We have one of two usual tables we like sitting at, that would be two round ones with high chairs in the center of the restaurant.  We'll sit elsewhere, just, you know, our favorites.

So of course, that's where we go to first.  We then saw them, and one was covered in trash and the other one had just started, by a family of 10 or so who managed to squeeze themselves into a four person booth.  Instead of throwing their trash out, they let it accumulate on two tables so they could all sit at the booth.  One of the things was a half-eaten burger. :-X

I'm not so sure if its flaky or not.  I mean, they did keep three tables all to themselves, plus some of the loose chairs.  On the other hand, it wasn't that busy and we did sit elsewhere.

Maybe it's just more What The Fineish than anything else.

Mal

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20692 on: April 25, 2013, 02:30:38 AM »
Not quite sure on that one. Did they use all three tables, as in sat at them, each chair occupied by a person, or were they just using the two extra tables for their trash? If the latter's the case... yeah, kinda iffy, but if the restaurant was empty otherwise, I'd let it go.

I wonder why their trash was allowed to build up as it did? Did nobody from the staff bus the tables? I know it's generally "bus your own tray" but I thought there was personnel for that as well, just not a lot...

Mediancat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20693 on: April 25, 2013, 08:03:01 AM »
I'm not sure young kids expecting to be given what they want when they ask nicely qualifies as SS; in a lot of cases, it simply means they haven't learned the other half of the lesson, yet. Now, if it's being used by someone past the age of 7 or so with the same expectation, that's a different story.

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TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20694 on: April 25, 2013, 08:13:04 AM »

But one Easter, during the big Easter mass when the church was full to bursting (they opened up two classrooms that adjoined the church to accommodate people and even they were full) one SS had his mobile phone ring right in the middle of the stations of the cross. This was in the 90s, before everyone had a mobile phone. The priest stopped, right in the middle and looked at him.


See, I think this is rude. The only thing the guy has done wrong is to *forget* to turn off his cell phone. And maybe so few people call him on it, esp. on a Sunday morning, that it just never occurred to him.

Or he meant to and forgot. Or he thought about it so hard, he thought he'd *done* it.

He didn't get out his cell phone and start making calls; someone *else* called him.

I'm of the opinion that ringing cell phones are sort of like farts--everyone should simply act as though they didn't happen.

LadyClaire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20695 on: April 25, 2013, 08:14:38 AM »
I once had someone who didn't seem to realize that saying "Please" wouldn't magically get him what he wanted.

He was calling to ask for an appointment with the Dean. Who was out of the country for three weeks. The guy wanted to meet with the Dean the next day. I kept saying "I am sorry, he is out of the country on business, he can meet with you on *date 3 weeks from that day*" The guy kept saying "I want to meet with him tomorrow, PLEASE" and the "Please" got louder, and more forceful every time he said it.

I finally told him "I'm sorry, but there is no possible way he can meet with you tomorrow. You will simply have to call back in three weeks" and hung up on him. By that point we'd been going in circles for a good 10 minutes.

Garden Goblin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20696 on: April 25, 2013, 08:20:39 AM »
ETA:  Are there really schools who say anytime someone asks you for a toy you MUST share it?

Not schools, but a certain Grandma's house and perceptions of certain cousins.  Rules had to be adjusted due to one cousin being a particularly special snowflake at times.

New rules
1 - You do not have to share with anyone who does not share with you.  If someone won't allow you to have a turn with their 'really neat' toy, you aren't obligated to hand your 'really neat' toy over no matter how much they demand it is 'their turn'.
2 - When selecting legos or similar toys, you do not have to agree to any trade you do not want.
3 - If a trade is agreed, you have two minutes in which to change your mind.  This serves to prevent peer pressure and cases in which the 'trade' was made without full consent or knowledge.  Attempts to cheat someone in a trade will result in paying a forfeit.
4 - Trades of personal items are not permanent unless agreed to by the responsible adults
5 - If you aren't willing to share the item, leave it home or put away when entertaining guests
6 - Mommy does not have to share her computer or assorted peripherals no matter how cool you or any of your guests think they are, and refusing to abide by this particular rule will result in guests going home immediately
7 - If Daddy is home sick, he does not have to share the big TV
8 - If you ate immediately before you came over and someone else is just starting their meal, they are not obligated to share their food with you
9 - Failure to come to agreement regarding turns and choice of game on the computer or console or having any disagreement regarding the computer or console result in yelling will end with the computer or console being turned off immediately and nobody getting to play.
10 - If the rule is at home that 'host' gets to choose the game, then the rule when visiting isn't that visitors get to choose the game.

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20697 on: April 25, 2013, 10:34:01 AM »
Sorry, if your child is THAT allergic then "uncontrolled" spaces need to be off-limits/monitored for you, not the whole world. I mean, squirrels run around playgrounds and they eat nuts, birds drop nuts and seeds...

The problem is, there's no boundary between "THAT allergic" and "just a little allergic" for many people.  Previous reactions don't necessarily predict future reactions - so if you know you're allergic to peanuts and you've had two mild-to-moderate reactions in the past, you don't know whether the third reaction will be anaphylaxis or whether it will just be a bit of a rash.  A huge percentage of kids nowadays have food allergies (10%, according to the article), and there's no "little bit" when it comes to unknown reactions.  It's a shame, because peanuts are such a good and cheap source of protein, but (as I mentioned upthread) I do think it's polite to moderate your peanut-germ-spreading ability when you're likely to be around children.

re: the bolded: Yes, this. It's definitely considerate and kind for parents of non-allergic children try their best not to spread serious allergens around kid-centric areas. The posted article also contains good info about how to do so (wipes instead of hand sanitizer, etc).

However, if (general) you don't have a kid with those kinds of allergies, you're probably not going to be nearly as vigilant or thorough because it's just not something you deal with or think about regularly. If I had a peanut-allergic child, I would not risk his life on "I don't see anyone eating peanuts or any peanut butter on the monkey bars, so we're safe." Who knows if the kid in the sandbox ate PB crackers before coming to the playground and mom didn't wash his hands properly, or he still has some crumbs on his shirt or PB on his breath? Or if the kid is a little older and got herself a granola bar mom didn't know about, so mom didn't know she needed to wipe hands, change shirt, rinse mouth, etc. Ultimately, it's still on the parents of the allergic child to be extra vigilant simply because they are the only ones who know best how to keep their child safe.

lady_disdain

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20698 on: April 25, 2013, 01:31:58 PM »

But one Easter, during the big Easter mass when the church was full to bursting (they opened up two classrooms that adjoined the church to accommodate people and even they were full) one SS had his mobile phone ring right in the middle of the stations of the cross. This was in the 90s, before everyone had a mobile phone. The priest stopped, right in the middle and looked at him.


See, I think this is rude. The only thing the guy has done wrong is to *forget* to turn off his cell phone. And maybe so few people call him on it, esp. on a Sunday morning, that it just never occurred to him.

Or he meant to and forgot. Or he thought about it so hard, he thought he'd *done* it.

He didn't get out his cell phone and start making calls; someone *else* called him.

I'm of the opinion that ringing cell phones are sort of like farts--everyone should simply act as though they didn't happen.

I disagree - the one thing he did was disrupt an important religious moment. The difference between a fart and a cell phone is that only one is an involuntary biological reflex. The cell phone comes under the umbrella of disrupting others through carelessness. Is it the worse thing he could have done? No, far from it, but a reminder that it is unacceptable is fine.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #20699 on: April 25, 2013, 01:45:16 PM »
Our church has the same "silence your cell phone" video that movie theaters do. It has helped a lot.