Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5109421 times)

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dawbs

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22035 on: July 01, 2013, 05:30:15 PM »
Quote
This became a big problem in my state when a casino opened. First, they found children left in cars. Once that was prohibited, the kids would be left in the hallways of the casinos, because they aren't allowing in the rooms where gambling is going on.

Every time parents do that, I think of poor Sherrice Iverson's death  :(   

*graphic child death warning*
http://articles.latimes.com/1997-05-28/news/mn-63101_1_casino-surveillance

Is there an update to that?  Did they find those men?
They did (warning, trigger-y), the NYT did a series of articles on it:
http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/people/i/sherrice_iverson/index.html

Rohanna

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22036 on: July 01, 2013, 05:32:24 PM »
One of the very first calls my husband did as a paramedic student was to a baby left....

In a locker at a subway stop outside a casino. Other people walking past heard faint and weak crying- the fire department had to break the locker and the baby was badly dehydrated and soiled, but otherwise apparently unharmed.

My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. ~ Jack Layton.

Hillia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22037 on: July 01, 2013, 05:40:32 PM »
Here's an example of how awareness has changed:  I'm on a 70's TV kick, and one of my shows is 'Emergency!', which follows LA paramedics on their calls.  In one case, they're called to a mall parking lot because people see a young child, who appears to be unconcious, in the back seat of a locked car.  The paramedics break open the window and pull the child out, just as the mother comes running out of the beauty salon.  She abuses the paramedics pretty thoroughly for breaking the car window and 'scaring' her child, who was just sleeping.  The bystanders join in, and the paramedics slink away.

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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22038 on: July 01, 2013, 06:16:29 PM »
Here's an example of how awareness has changed:  I'm on a 70's TV kick, and one of my shows is 'Emergency!', which follows LA paramedics on their calls.  In one case, they're called to a mall parking lot because people see a young child, who appears to be unconcious, in the back seat of a locked car.  The paramedics break open the window and pull the child out, just as the mother comes running out of the beauty salon.  She abuses the paramedics pretty thoroughly for breaking the car window and 'scaring' her child, who was just sleeping.  The bystanders join in, and the paramedics slink away.

That description almost makes it sound like "Cops"... it's actually more like Dragnet.  The stories you have seen are true. :)
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Midnight Kitty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22039 on: July 01, 2013, 07:24:04 PM »
We have a new dog, DH's first doggie ever.  He is in canine heaven, getting his first taste of doggy devotion.  We haven't left little Honey Girl alone for more than 5 minutes since we rescued her 5 weeks ago.  We have neighbors who lost their dog last January and they volunteered to dog-sit for us any time.  We just aren't confident that she won't bark yet, so we're starting with leaving her alone for very short periods.  For example, we stopped at the library on the way home from work.  DH went in to use the bathroom while I took Honey Girl out to pee/poop.  I put her back in the car with the windows cracked and went in to get my books.  As I walked into the library, DH was walking out, so Honey Girl was left alone for about 30 seconds.

We live in Hawaii.  Our heat wave is not as dangerous as the one hitting the Mainland US this week, but leaving a child or pet alone in a car out in the sun can be life threatening.  We won't even leave our dog in the car for more than 1 minute; Who are these parents who leave their children alone, unattended, abandoned?  Don't they care?

We were never able to have children; I call this type of child neglect the "we can always make more" mindset.

On the other hand, my mother used to let 12 year old me stay in the van when she was taking classes to earn her master's degree.  I would read or nap until she got out of class.  Sometimes she let me sit quietly in the back of the room.  I subliminally learned kinesiology before I could spell it.  The 1960s were a different world.
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BabyMama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22040 on: July 01, 2013, 07:42:07 PM »
November was when his last offense occurred. Eesh.
And he is still free and allowed contact with the child why?

No idea. AND they're not pressing charges--they are forwarding his case to the attorney general, but he hasn't been cited or punished as far as I know.

TeamBhakta

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22041 on: July 01, 2013, 08:07:42 PM »
Here's an example of how awareness has changed:  I'm on a 70's TV kick, and one of my shows is 'Emergency!', which follows LA paramedics on their calls.  In one case, they're called to a mall parking lot because people see a young child, who appears to be unconcious, in the back seat of a locked car.  The paramedics break open the window and pull the child out, just as the mother comes running out of the beauty salon.  She abuses the paramedics pretty thoroughly for breaking the car window and 'scaring' her child, who was just sleeping.  The bystanders join in, and the paramedics slink away.

I just watched that one the other day. I was getting ready to post it here, too. Small world  ;D

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22042 on: July 01, 2013, 08:46:40 PM »
Here's an example of how awareness has changed:  I'm on a 70's TV kick, and one of my shows is 'Emergency!', which follows LA paramedics on their calls.  In one case, they're called to a mall parking lot because people see a young child, who appears to be unconcious, in the back seat of a locked car.  The paramedics break open the window and pull the child out, just as the mother comes running out of the beauty salon.  She abuses the paramedics pretty thoroughly for breaking the car window and 'scaring' her child, who was just sleeping.  The bystanders join in, and the paramedics slink away.

I just watched that one the other day. I was getting ready to post it here, too. Small world  ;D

Even in the 70's when I was growing up my parents did NOT leave us in the the car in Houston Heat. 
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RegionMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22043 on: July 01, 2013, 08:49:01 PM »
But a 12 year old can let themselves out of a car, if need arises.  A baby strapped in a car seat is at the mercy of the adult in charge.

Hint I have actually called in to the local radio station since our town has had more than one child left in a car when the parent changes morning routine and goes to work not realizing baby is in the back-

leave your laptop or heels or wallet or work bag or ID tag or office key or uniform jacket or nametag or lunch or water bottle etc...in the back next to the carseat.  When you reach back to get your needed item for work, you will see if the child is there and act accordingly.
Fear is temporary...Regret is forever.

greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22044 on: July 01, 2013, 11:58:03 PM »
I've had the "don't leave your pets/small children in the car because of the heat" thing so thoroughly beaten into my head that I had to stop and think about the fact that my cat would, in fact, be okay in the van I was driving in her crate for half an hour while I went and got her some supplies because it was midnight and it was somewhere in the 60s outside. 

Even as an adult, I almost passed out from the heat in a closed car once - it was only closed up for a minute or two before I started feeling light-headed.  I can't imagine most 12-year-olds recognizing the symptoms of developing heat stroke quickly enough and opening the car up, especially if a parent had told them not to open the door. 

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22045 on: July 02, 2013, 02:32:19 AM »
Just to add to all the kids in cars stuff...

When I was 11 (OK, so not quite 12, but close enough) my mother used to lock me in the car when she went to pick up stuff. Our car had child locks on all the doors (stupid feature) that could only be opened from the inside with the remote control key thing. I was never left to die of heat stroke, although it could easily have happened. I never liked it.

Once a guy broke in while I was in there, and told me gruffly to get out. When he saw I couldn't, he made moves to drive off with me in the back of the car. Very fortunately, my mother was returning and had seen the guy force his way in, and started running. She managed to stop him in time. And then, the entire incident was blamed on me.

You should not leave a kid in a car unattended in the same way you shouldn't leave them anywhere else unattended. Apart from heat stroke (which few 12 year olds, let alone adults it seems, can recognise in themselves or younger siblings, let alone know the gravity of or properly deal with), there are emergency situations like the one I was forced into.

I have absolutely no sympathy for people who leave kids alone in cars and then try to find excuses for it. None. It doesn't matter what their excuse is; they have proven themselves incapable of caring for a child responsibly. Absolute scum. People can claim memory problems or a change in schedule or whatever they like--it doesn't alter the fact that, in perfectly normal circumstances which one could reasonably expect to occur again at some point, they put their child in danger. If they did it once, there is little stopping them from doing it again the next time a similar situation comes along. If it has to happen even once before they realise that it's dangerous, despite all the information out there, then that just isn't good enough. Do they not realise that fire is dangerous until they let their kid get burned? You don't get second chances with child safety. A person like this cannot care for a child.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22046 on: July 02, 2013, 02:41:39 AM »
Once a guy broke in while I was in there, and told me gruffly to get out. When he saw I couldn't, he made moves to drive off with me in the back of the car. Very fortunately, my mother was returning and had seen the guy force his way in, and started running. She managed to stop him in time. And then, the entire incident was blamed on me.

Whaaaaaaaa?!

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22047 on: July 02, 2013, 02:47:06 AM »
Once a guy broke in while I was in there, and told me gruffly to get out. When he saw I couldn't, he made moves to drive off with me in the back of the car. Very fortunately, my mother was returning and had seen the guy force his way in, and started running. She managed to stop him in time. And then, the entire incident was blamed on me.

Whaaaaaaaa?!

My parents were great with some things, but absolutely not great with other things. This is why they are no longer part of my life: even as an adult they continued to put my safety at risk.

Dazi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22048 on: July 02, 2013, 07:19:38 AM »
A man here left his 8-month-old child in the car for 30+ minutes (with the doors unlocked and the windows rolled down.) It was a combination of very hot and very humid, and very stormy this weekend, so both pretty bad contenders for leaving your kid in the car. The news is saying 30 minutes, but it was 12:30 when someone called the police, and 1:00 when the car owner appeared, so really it could have been an hour or more.  :o When he saw the police waiting for him, he told them that he'd only been a minute...or only meant to be a minute, but had decided to run some additional errands while he was there.

AND. He did the same thing last summer with a baby (they didn't say if it was the same one though.)

I live in South Florida, and this is completely intolerable.  A child could literally roast to death in that period of time.

Years ago, my dad bought me a contraption to keep in the car that had a box-cutter-like blade in one end and a sharp pointed hammer at the other.  The idea was to be able to slice open your seat belt after a crash if it was still locked, and/or to tap the hammer on the glass to break it and get out of the car.  I was at Publix two years ago this week, and a baby was locked in a car without the A/C running.  I was without my cell phone so I went back into the pet store (where the manager is now our permanent dog-sitter) to have them call the sheriff.  Three minutes had passed, another person was at the window of the car on her cell phone (smart lady!), and the baby was crying.  I broke the window with the Hammer of Dad.  The sheriff arrived about two minutes later, followed by an ambulance, just as the parents came out of the grocery store laden with bags and bags.  By then, I was back in my car and headed home.  I have no idea what happened to them, if anything, but I sent a quick thank you note to my dad for the hammer.  I really hope they were hauled away in cuffs, but this area is, er, well to do and they may have skated.

I have personally witnessed this twice and both times the police were called and someone had to break out a window to get the child out before the police got there.  Both times the parents were arrested. It was easily over 90 degrees outside. Once someone left their child in a car while shopping and the car was stolen out of the parking lot...luckily the thief dropped the baby in a neighboring parking lot, still in the car seat.  The baby was fine and the parent was arrested and given a ticket for leaving the keys in the car with it running (I guess they thought if they had the AC going for the baby it would be alright, but leaving your car running is just screaming for it to be stolen).

Seen this happen with dogs also and people are always shocked that an officer broke out their window.
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LadyClaire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22049 on: July 02, 2013, 07:54:14 AM »
When I worked at Gamestop, a father once parked his car in the emergency lane and came in to shop. It was snowing outside and was really, really cold..and no, he hadn't left the car running. I was coming in to the store as the guy was leaving, and I saw that his baby girl was inside the car.

The manager said the guy had been in there for about half an hour, shopping for video games. They hadn't noticed the baby in the car (the big posters in the windows blocked their view of the car from inside the store), otherwise they would've called the police.

Sadly, we saw stuff like that a lot. Parents leaving their kids in the car while they came inside to shop because they didn't want to listen to their kids asking for this or that video game.